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Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond Elementary’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 1, 1991

Rural stronghold faces onslaught of new building

By John H. Stevens
Times South bureau

Some Black Diamond residents wonder if development is compatible with the area’s coal mining operations. Chien-Chi Chang/Seattle Times

BLACK DIAMOND—This sleepy little town in the Cascade foothills is about to have a population explosion, and Robert Murphy knows why.

Murphy, a Seattle homebuilder, has come all the way out here to put up six houses in the middle of town because the lots are cheap, and the Black Diamond government receptive.

“It doesn’t take any time at all to get a permit here,” Murphy says. “It’s one of the last receptive areas to growth in King County—a little oasis.” (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, February 1, 1999

Officials say no, but residents appeal for signal on busy SR-169

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Students from Black Diamond Elementary School cross busy Highway 169 at Baker Street after school Friday. Highway planners propose a yellow flashing light for use only when school children are coming and going. But residents insist traffic has grown to the point that a stoplight is needed for pedestrian safety. (Marcus R. Donner/Journal)

BLACK DIAMOND — Lorianne Taff rarely allows her 10-year-old son to cross State Route 169 by himself to get candy at the Cenex station.

Only recently did she give her 13-year-old son, a junior high student, permission to negotiate the usually busy two-lane highway that bisects this small rural town.

As a mother, a Black Diamond resident, and an Enumclaw School Board member, Taff worries about the highway and its growing traffic. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 1991

By Jackie Zils

Black Diamond’s elementary school may be regarded as a “little brother” in its school system (Enumclaw), but it more than holds its own with larger schools. — VOICE photo.

Being a small school brings big returns to Black Diamond Elementary.

Often regarded as a sort of “little brother” to the rest of the Enumclaw School District, Black Diamond may be reaping the most benefits.

Students have more access to computers and library resources than their counterparts in the rest of the district. Curriculum materials aren’t spread as thin among the teaching staff. Administrative and support staff have fewer people to deal with because of Black Diamond’s smaller population. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 11, 1984

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

What should to be done with 11 acres of King County-owned land in the center of Black Diamond?

A recently completed study done for the King County Housing Authority recommends phased development of the site with single-family, owner-occupied homes and rental apartments for moderate- to low-income elderly persons.

The Housing Authority presented its recommendations to residents during a public meeting last night at the Black Diamond Elementary School. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, November 13, 1996

By Casey Olson
The Courier-Herald

No video tape in the world could hold the rich history of the Black Diamond community.

There is just too much of it.

But give Bob Eaton and Micki Ryan a lot of credit. The pair is undertaking the mission impossible and attempting to put together the first-ever video history of the history-rich town.

They’ve found the task fascinating and time consuming.

The coal mining industry brought immigrants from all around the world to the tiny hamlet nestled in the Cascade foothills during the late 1800s and early 1900s, turning the quiet community into a bustling city. Italians, Greeks, Chinese, Germans, Hungarians, and Irish were blended together every day, a clash of cultures that helped form the modern day community of Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 10, 1925

That all men who ride coal trips are not coal miners is proven by this picture. The Bulletin photographer caught this trip just before it started for the twelfth level of Black Diamond Mine, where more than 1,500 feet below sea level, an attempt was made by radio experts to log some of the programs with which the air above the surface is charged. But the mine was too deep for the radio waves.

Cager Victor McDonald and Supt. Paul Gallagher are shown on the rear end, with Manager of Mines D.C. Botting in the car. Joe Bennett and Maj. S.E. Hutton are in the lower car. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 1994

By Heather Larson

Left to right: Jennifer Simmons, Danny Simmons, and Ashley Petersen prepare to enter the parade route in their horse-drawn wagon representing Four Corners Safeway.

Black Diamond celebrated Labor Day weekend with a fever this year. After having last year’s event cancelled for lack of volunteers, no holds were barred. Something for everyone was offered during the 4 days from a fish dinner on Friday night to a bed race on Sunday and a parade down the Maple Valley Highway on Monday.

On Saturday amid torrential downpours the Black Diamond Police challenged the Black Diamond Fire Department to a softball game. Since the police, who chose to be called the DARE Devils, didn’t have the manpower to field a team, other police officers who live in Black Diamond were asked to help out. So King County, Bellevue, and Seattle Police Departments were also represented on the team.

According to Black Diamond officer Glenn Dickson, the highlight of the game was the 8-foot mud pit behind first base.

It was really wet and muddy, but a good time was had by all, said Dickson.

The DARE Devils beat the Hosers 13 to 9 at the first annual baseball game. (more…)

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