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Posts Tagged ‘Black Diamond Elementary’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 3, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Ivan Gingrich, left, shares a laugh with Bill VanRuff, Bob Schuler, Bill Woodcock, and Jeff Snelling in celebration of the completion of refurbishment of the Black Diamond gymnasium. Gingrich and Schuler, who work for Tahoma School District’s maintenance department, volunteered to refinish the gym floor on their own time. VanRuff, Woodcock, and Snelling are members of Maple Valley Rotary, which donated labor and money to refurbish the gym.

Kids in the City of Black Diamond were so excited about their gym’s reopening, which had been a work in progress since being moved from the Black Diamond Elementary School in 1992, that they hopped on their bikes and made their way to the gym long before the celebration was set to begin on Saturday, June 23. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 2, 1997

By Paul Gottlieb
The Courier-Herald

Black Diamond playground took new shape last week as new playground equipment was installed. (Photo by Paul Gottlieb)

Like weekend warriors, a squad of 20 to 30 Black Diamond residents armed with rakes and shovels descend upon the town’s elementary school playground every Saturday to upgrade the only play area for children—and adults—for miles around.

By July 12, the volunteers and the heavy equipment operators they trail expect to complete a project that will double the size of the existing playground by expanding it into a field owned by Enumclaw School District. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Reporter, July 1, 2011

By TJ Martinell

Black Diamond baseball field, circa 1915.

The Black Diamond baseball field during a game.

Coal mining towns have always been a point of fascination to me.

There were two things which prompted my interest as a kid. The first was when my family took a trip to Knott’s Berry Farm. The Calico Mine Ride, a train tour into an animatronic coal mine, had a way sparking the imagination of a precocious 3-year-old whose head was already in the clouds.

The second reason was both historical and personal. My ancestor, John Bush, was one of the first white people born in the Issaquah Valley where there was a very active coal mining industry. When I was around 9 years old, my grandfather gave me a special coin commemorating the formation of the Royal Arch Mason Chapter 39 in Issaquah—dated September 22, 1914, with John Bush’s name engraved on the back.

So, when I first went to Black Diamond in search of a story, I was already interested in what the town had to offer in terms of history. While I was writing articles about Franklin and Welsh heritage, however, I became more interested in their prolific sports history.

At the front desk of the museum is a glass exhibit of their sports legacy; old baseball uniforms, basketball trophies, soccer team portraits, and autographed baseballs. It wasn’t hard for me to perceive the kind of significance sports had there. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 14, 1989

Zach Sullivan and Jennifer Drury earn the Pettersen Award. Photo by Brenda Berube.

Black Diamond Elementary School started off the succession of sixth-grade graduations June 6 with a formal ceremony that included awards and diplomas.

Black Diamond sixth-grade teacher Rich Hubber said the sixth-grade graduation is a spin-off from the old eight-grade graduation, back when graduating from the eighth-grade was as far as most students got.

“It’s part of the tradition of the school,” Hubber said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 11, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Left to right: Conrad “Coke” Roberts (Class of ’41) and Joe Zumek (Class of ’43) look forward to meeting up with classmates they have not seen in many years as well as meeting other Black Diamond High School graduates for the first time.

Little did they know that when 36 students entered first grade in September 1931, the graduating class of 1943 would be the last class to graduate from Black Diamond High School. In honor of the Class of 1943 as well as commemorating the closing of the high school, over 70 Black Diamond graduates from its various graduating classes will be gathering once again to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the last class to graduate from Black Diamond High School.

Schoolmates from as far away as Las Vegas, California, Idaho, and Oregon will be making the trip to reminisce of days gone by. Two of those in attendance (both from the class of 1926) will include Ruby (Favro) Keeney, 96, of Enumclaw, and Ernesta (Franchini) Van der Heyden, 96, from a rest home in Lake Forest. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 29, 1998

Teen drivers inspire installation near school

By Dionne Searcey
Seattle Times South bureau

Sixty years ago, the roads of the Black Diamond settlement bustled with coal miners commuting to their jobs at the nearby Pacific Coast Coal Co.

But it took dozens of teens behind the wheel to inspire installation of the tiny town’s first stoplight.

Crews from King County will install a stoplight this summer outside Kentlake High School to slow the flow of teen drivers in and out of the school parking lot that clog Lake Sawyer Road. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 1, 1991

Rural stronghold faces onslaught of new building

By John H. Stevens
Times South bureau

Some Black Diamond residents wonder if development is compatible with the area’s coal mining operations. Chien-Chi Chang/Seattle Times

BLACK DIAMOND—This sleepy little town in the Cascade foothills is about to have a population explosion, and Robert Murphy knows why.

Murphy, a Seattle homebuilder, has come all the way out here to put up six houses in the middle of town because the lots are cheap, and the Black Diamond government receptive.

“It doesn’t take any time at all to get a permit here,” Murphy says. “It’s one of the last receptive areas to growth in King County—a little oasis.” (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, February 1, 1999

Officials say no, but residents appeal for signal on busy SR-169

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Students from Black Diamond Elementary School cross busy Highway 169 at Baker Street after school Friday. Highway planners propose a yellow flashing light for use only when school children are coming and going. But residents insist traffic has grown to the point that a stoplight is needed for pedestrian safety. (Marcus R. Donner/Journal)

BLACK DIAMOND — Lorianne Taff rarely allows her 10-year-old son to cross State Route 169 by himself to get candy at the Cenex station.

Only recently did she give her 13-year-old son, a junior high student, permission to negotiate the usually busy two-lane highway that bisects this small rural town.

As a mother, a Black Diamond resident, and an Enumclaw School Board member, Taff worries about the highway and its growing traffic. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 1991

By Jackie Zils

Black Diamond’s elementary school may be regarded as a “little brother” in its school system (Enumclaw), but it more than holds its own with larger schools. — VOICE photo.

Being a small school brings big returns to Black Diamond Elementary.

Often regarded as a sort of “little brother” to the rest of the Enumclaw School District, Black Diamond may be reaping the most benefits.

Students have more access to computers and library resources than their counterparts in the rest of the district. Curriculum materials aren’t spread as thin among the teaching staff. Administrative and support staff have fewer people to deal with because of Black Diamond’s smaller population. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 11, 1984

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

What should to be done with 11 acres of King County-owned land in the center of Black Diamond?

A recently completed study done for the King County Housing Authority recommends phased development of the site with single-family, owner-occupied homes and rental apartments for moderate- to low-income elderly persons.

The Housing Authority presented its recommendations to residents during a public meeting last night at the Black Diamond Elementary School. (more…)

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