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Posts Tagged ‘Franklin’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 12, 1960

Jack Hayes, 90 years old Tuesday, recalls early-day logging and mining at Renton

By Morda Slauson

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

A man who has been a Washingtonian since 1872 will celebrate his 90th birthday anniversary Tuesday.

He is John E. Hayes, 1734 Alki Av., known affectionatly as “Jack” to hundreds of South King County residents. Until recently, he resided at Renton, his home most of the years since 1880.

Hayes remembers old-time hay and potato fields where the big, new shopping center was built in the past year at the foot of Earlington Hill.

As a boy, he greased skids for the first logging at the Highlands, east of Renton. Now, modern machinery is tearing up the hillside to extend a state highway.

As a man he owned a homestead at Buffalo Station, on Rainier Avenue, which was taken by the government in the Second World War for expansion of Renton Airport.

On a recent trip around Renton, Hayes surveyed the shopping center and remembered when he went “hitching” in the hay fields, belonging to Erasmus Smithers, who with J.P. Morris and C.B. Shattuck, plotted the town of Renton in 1878. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 5, 1919

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Employing a whole army of 2,500 persons—operating four different companies—and maintaining a payroll of approximately $4,000,000 a year—the Pacific Coast Company is one of the great corporations contributing to the prosperity and growth of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1914

Solid gold decorations conferred upon five men who have been members twenty-five years

FRANKLIN, Monday, June 1—Veteran jewels of solid gold, handsomely decorated and inscribed, were conferred with special ceremony here Saturday night upon five Knights, who have been twenty-five years in the Pythian order.

The recipients were: Charles McKinnon, Black Diamond; David Nellis and David Daniels, of Vancouver B.C., members of Green River Lodge No. 33, Franklin; and Watkin Evans, of Rainier Lodge No. 17, Black Diamond. The last named is the father of former Deputy County Engineer George Evans, and now an Alaskan mining expert of note. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 20, 1919

Athletic association organized at Black Diamond to promote sports

Black Diamond clubhouse, 1924

Black Diamond clubhouse, 1924

Delegates from the various mining camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company met recently in Black Diamond and formed an athletic and first aid association which promises to become a factor in the community.

The object of the association is to promote clean sport, build and equip clubhouses at the various camps, and revive interest in healthful outdoor exercise. Two contests will be held in the near future, with prizes offered. The camps represented include Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, Burnett, Franklin, and the Seattle shops.

The following officers were selected to act as an advisory board: Ernest Newsham, honorary president; Stephen H. Green, honorary vice president; N.H. Freeman, president; Frank Rice, vice president; Dr. Mallory, treasurer; G.F. Clancey, secretary; one delegate from each camp.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 16, 1924

Now in its third successful year of operation, the Mine Council system of collective bargaining as worked out by the employees and officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company is functioning to the entire satisfaction of all parties concerned. The group shown herewith is the Central Council, composed of representatives from each of the Mine Councils, which meets in Seattle once each month. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 14, 1918

Throughout the nation the call is resounding, “Lay in your next winter’s coal NOW.”

That is the urgent appeal of the United States Fuel Administration, and it applies with as much force in the State of Washington as in any other state in the Union, so officials of the administration point out it is a patriotic duty as well as a measure of preparedness to see that the fuel bin is filled up quickly, for the nation is facing such problems as never confronted her before in the mining and distribution of coal.

Industries, especially those engaged in war work, have first call on the coal production, and they are going at fever heat, with an acceleration that means a continual increase in coal consumption.

To move crops and war materials next fall and winter will require the entire car capacity of all the railroads. This means that the cars must get in their work now in hauling the coal you will need next winter. Nor does a car shortage condition impend only in the Eastern states. (more…)

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