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Posts Tagged ‘Franklin’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 14, 1888

No change for better or worse reported—the miners working upon brattice work

No change for better or worse was reported from the Franklin coal mine fire yesterday. Mr. Milner went out there again, going through the mine with Superintendent Watkins. He authorizes the denial of the rumor of Mr. Watkins’ resignation.

The fire is in the lower McKay tunnel, and has been located in a worked out “breast.” Mr. Milner said they were attempting to smother it out, with every prospect of success. The air is to be shut out by brattice work, which the miners began to put up Wednesday night, and which it was expected to be completed by this morning.

The effort to extinguish the fire by flooding the mine has been abandoned. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1980

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18x24; Total Wt. 110,000.

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18×24; Total Wt. 110,000.

The Black Diamond Company wanted a railroad completed as quickly as possible because the Mt. Diablo coal field was declining fast. Surveying began under the Oregon Improvement Company in April 1882 for a Columbia and Puget Sound Cedar River extension. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 12, 1895

Since the bodies of the four miners, who lost their lives in the mine fire at Franklin October 17 last, have been recovered, the strain on the nerves of the workmen of the mine has been relieved and the miners have now but one object in view—the reopening of the mine.

It is believed that coal will be coming up the main slope by January 10. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 11, 1895

Entombed three months: The four men who went down in the coal mine during a slope fire—work of rescue has been progressing for about a month

B.F. Bush, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, received word today from Franklin that the bodies of the four miners who lost their lives in the mine fire of October 17 last had been recovered. The bodies were almost incinerated, but were identified by articles and particles of clothing found on the bodies. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 7, 1895

No trace of the dead bodies. Coal will be shipped from No. 7 this month—Railroad Avenue death-trap closed

The main slope of the Oregon Improvement Company’s mine at Franklin, which has been closed since the recent disaster, has been opened to the sixth level, and before the end of the present month will be again in condition for the taking out of coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 6, 1923

During the month of October, when the mines broke all known records in the production of coal, the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Wenatchee depot turned in one of the best months in its history.

The view above shows the yard office at Wenatchee, with George Glann, veteran of 17 years, and the yard foreman, standing near the entrance. H.H. Boyd is the agent at Wenatchee, and his aggressiveness is resulting in the wide distribution of this company’s product throughout that district. (more…)

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