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Posts Tagged ‘Franklin’

By W.D. Reese

Come friends and fellow citizens, come sisters if you will,
A verse or two I’ll sing to you of the dead of Franklin,
On the 24th of August in 1894. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 8, 1924

Everywhere in the mines of Western Washington, and particularly in the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, there is much stress placed on safety work. As a result the number of serious accidents is kept down to a minimum.

This scene shows the precautions taken to support the roof while the miner operates the “slugger” in undercutting the coal. As he prefers not to reveal his identity, we leave it to you to guess the name of this “Safety First” miner. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Star, August 1, 1902

Says mining town is impregnated with vice, and that prosecuting attorney should interfere to enforce decency and order

That he has failed in his efforts to control vice and crime in his own community and that it is now up to the highest peace officers of the county to take a hand in the game is the belief of Deputy Sheriff and Constable J.P. Morris, of Franklin, the largest coal mining town in the county, 32 miles southeast of Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 26, 1966

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

At one time, coal mining was a big operation in the Puget Sound area. Before the turn of the century, the black gold was being dug from foothill sites such as Carbonado and Black Diamond, Newcastle and Franklin, Renton and Ravensdale, Coal Creek and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 12, 1960

Jack Hayes, 90 years old Tuesday, recalls early-day logging and mining at Renton

By Morda Slauson

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

A man who has been a Washingtonian since 1872 will celebrate his 90th birthday anniversary Tuesday.

He is John E. Hayes, 1734 Alki Av., known affectionatly as “Jack” to hundreds of South King County residents. Until recently, he resided at Renton, his home most of the years since 1880.

Hayes remembers old-time hay and potato fields where the big, new shopping center was built in the past year at the foot of Earlington Hill.

As a boy, he greased skids for the first logging at the Highlands, east of Renton. Now, modern machinery is tearing up the hillside to extend a state highway.

As a man he owned a homestead at Buffalo Station, on Rainier Avenue, which was taken by the government in the Second World War for expansion of Renton Airport.

On a recent trip around Renton, Hayes surveyed the shopping center and remembered when he went “hitching” in the hay fields, belonging to Erasmus Smithers, who with J.P. Morris and C.B. Shattuck, plotted the town of Renton in 1878. (more…)

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