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Posts Tagged ‘Franklin’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 11, 1913

Men employed in collieries of Pacific Coast Company quit in sympathy with discharged committeeman

Organization growing about Black Diamond

Seven hundred miners employed in the three collieries of the Pacific Coast Company at Black Diamond walked out this morning because the company had refused to reinstate George Ayers, a member of the “pit committee,” reputed to be an I.W.W. organizer in the Black Diamond district.

Ayers was discharged following a quarrel with a subforman named Mitchell, with whom he had taken up a grievance of a miner who had not been supplied with a “bucker.” Ayers is said to have become abusive when Mitchell told him that he had no authority to regulate employment. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, July 1994

By Barbara Nilson
Based on taped interview by Bill McDermand in November 1993 and interview by Barbara and Edward Nilson in June 1994.

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

But the road to the outfield of the Boston Red Sox in the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals wasn’t easy.

He was born in Taylor in 1912 to Veronica and Michael Lazor (pronounced Lawser in the Valley but known as Laser like the beam in baseball circles) who had immigrated from Czechoslovakia. His folks met in New York in the 1890s and went to Franklin around 1908 for his Dad to work in the mines dumping cars. They then moved to Taylor where the first of four children were born.

The oldest was Mary, born in 1908, then Mike, 1910, and Johnny was next. In 1914 the family moved onto their 20-acre farm in Hobart and the youngest boy, Vincent was born.

His folks paid $10 an acre for the farm, which they sold in 1969 to the Bill McDermand family. It is located on the old road to Taylor (S.E. 208th St.) on the north side. When his folks moved here it had all been logged off, but huge stumps remained. Lazor said it took a box and a half of powder just to blow them open. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 27, 1919

The fourth annual statewide mine rescue and first aid meet, to be held under the joint auspices of the United States Bureau of Mines, the state mine inspection department, the Washington Coal Operators’ Association, and District No. 10 of the United Mine Workers of America, will be staged at Black Diamond on Saturday, August 9, according to an announcement made by the executive committee in charge of arrangements. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 20, 1902

He may be in the woods near Sawyer Lake or he may be miles away—No one knows

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

Tracy has apparently dropped as completely out of sight as though the earth had opened and swallowed him. Since his disappearance from the cabin on the shores of Lake Sawyer last Wednesday afternoon, or night, no trace of him has been had.

His long silence and failure to appear at some house for food and clothing lends weight to the opinion of Sheriff Cudihee that Tracy is still in hiding in the vicinity of the lake. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 16, 1975

By D’Ann Pedee

Like the Olympia slogan, maybe “it’s the water.”

Then again, it could be the woods, or the peace, or the pace. Whatever “it” is, there is definitely a “something” which lures Maple Valley people back to Maple Valley.

And so it has been with Kathreen Mechem, an attorney who lives on Lake Sawyer. Although it took her thirty years, she is now back with a home on property which her family has owned for fifty years. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Star, July 9, 1907

Joe Morozek, the Franklin miner who shot and instantly killed Banassi Diego last Saturday, was this morning brought to the county jail.

Morozek was captured last night about 8 o’clock, just after he had entered his own home at Franklin. Special Deputy Walter Warnock of Franklin was watching the building and caused his arrest. The slayer of Diego was half famished and ragged. (more…)

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