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Originally published in Hobart Recollections, 1988

By Colin McDonald

Did you know that where the Hobart Fire Station now stands there was once a swamp?

In about 1931 (give or take a year) there was a swamp, starting at the corner of the Hobart and Taylor roads. It ran on about a 40- or 45-degree angle east, up close to where the old gym used to be.

The fill was made in a very unusual way, by today’s standards. In those days there was not a dump truck and bulldozer sitting on every corner. Mr. Bill Peacock, with his two horses, wagon, and Fresno scraper did the job over several months, hauling a yard to a yard and a half in each load. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 27, 1923

This group shows some of the supervisors at Black Diamond Mine upon whose shoulders falls much of the responsibility for getting out the coal. From left to right, standing, Fireboss Henry Becker, Supt. J.J. Jones, Fireboss Gomer Evans, Lampman Elmer Hyneman, and Fireboss Richard Barry. Kneeling in front are Mine Foreman Dave Hughes and Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, September 10, 1967

By Nick Dimartino

Mrs. Muriel Wing on the telephone

Mrs. Muriel Wing on the telephone

“Every year they choose someone who’s done something nice for the community and the kids, and this year the darn nuts figured it was me.”

So said Mrs. Muriel Wing, Black Diamond’s Woman of the Year and the second woman so honored. Usually Black Diamond names a Man of the Year.

Mrs. Wing, named on Labor Day as recipient of the plaque, said yesterday the award was a complete surprise.

“I wasn’t even listening to the speech,” she said. “I don’t even know what they said about me.”

Mrs. Wing is the mother-adviser of the Black Diamond Rainbow girls, who have sent nearly 2,500 books to the hospital ship Repose in Vietnam waters.

She has played piano and organ for both churches in Black Diamond for local christenings, marriages, funerals, and other ceremonies. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 16, 1987

By Eulalia Tollefson

Bill Petchnick, Jr. was honored by his Black Diamond friends and neighbors, who chose him Black Diamond’s Person of the Year.

Bill Petchnick, Jr. was honored by his Black Diamond friends and neighbors, who chose him Black Diamond’s Person of the Year.

Clowns, cute kiddies, and a carnival atmosphere—all ingredients for a great community celebration—greeted crowds who arrived for one of the best ever Black Diamond Labor Day festivals.

Enjoyment was enhanced by games, good food, and a “hi, neighbor” element, along with balmy, sunny weather.

Highlights of the celebration were the 56-entry parade directed by Charlene Birklid and the presentation of Labor Day dignitaries, with Diane Olson serving as emcee. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 29, 1959

By John Reddin

Reminiscing: William Peacock, 73, astride his 30-year-old riding horse, Coalie, recalled the early days of Hobart School, in the background, to Steve Dickman, left, 9, and Jimmy Thompson, 10, who attended the school until it was decided recently to tear it down. Hobart school children will attend a new consolidated school near Lake Wilderness. —Times staff photo by John T Closs.

Reminiscing: William Peacock, 73, astride his 30-year-old riding horse, Coalie, recalled the early days of Hobart School, in the background, to Steve Dickman, left, 9, and Jimmy Thompson, 10, who attended the school until it was decided recently to tear it down. Hobart school children will attend a new consolidated school near Lake Wilderness. —Times staff photo by John T Closs.

While small boys romped and scuffled nearby, middle-aged parents and oldsters of Hobart, east of Maple Valley, yesterday were busy tearing down the old Hobart country school.

The four-room frame schoolhouse, with its traditional school-bell tower, long has been a landmark on the Issaquah-Ravensdale road. Built in 1909, the four-room school has served its purpose. Pupils will attend a new school under construction near Lake Wilderness under a school-district consolidation. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 4, 1975

(This is the third in a series of articles on historical personages written by students in Mrs. Vicci Beck’s history class at Tahoma Junior High School.)

By Bruce Jensen

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

The following article is from an interview with Edith Wright who has lived in Hobart since 1909. The interview proved very fruitful, with Mrs. Wright being a veritable storehouse of facts about Hobart in the early 1900s. I had no trouble in obtaining the information from her and enjoyed the interview very much.

Edith Wright

Mrs. Wright’s father was one of the most colorful and influential figures in Hobart’s history, Oscar “Strawberry” Johnson. He was a leader by nature, and did much to improve the Hobart area.

In 1907 he bought the remaining 80 acres of the Clifford homestead and began raising strawberries. The first year, he planted two or three acres, but later he planted more. Penny Clifford peddled the berries in Taylor, Ravensdale, Black Diamond, and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 19, 1923

Photo by James & Merryhew

Photo by James & Merryhew

No mention of Black Diamond would be complete without reference to Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Christensen, whose likenesses are shown above.

“Dad” Christensen, as he is familiarly known, is the Justice of the Peace in Black Diamond and is generally regarded as the father of the camp. Under his paternal care every operation of the camp’s varied activities, from the distribution of the Bulletin to the distribution of the mine’s output, is constantly watched and safeguarded. (more…)

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