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Posts Tagged ‘churches’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 15, 1925

One of the first structures in Carbonado to catch the eye of the visitor is that of the company store. Of brick construction, it houses the general merchandise store and meat market, while in the rear is situated the mine office. Manager C.T. Paulson and his staff are always ready to see that the wants of every customer are promptly satisfied. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 19, 1924

Olaf Bodding, of the Bodding Transfer Co., Juneau, Alaska, is here seen with his team, ready to deliver a ton of Black Diamond screened coal, sacked, to a customer who lives half way up the mountain. That the problem of delivering coal in Juneau, especially half way up the mountain, is somewhat different than might be supposed, is seen in the fact that to deliver this ton of coal the cost to the customer for delivery alone is $6, to say nothing of the cost of the coal itself.

Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets are both popular fuels in Juneau, according to H.G. Walmsley, agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company there. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 12, 1924

This trade-mark of the Pacific Coast Coal Company or some modification of it, has been proposed as the ideal design for an emblem to be worn by members and past-members of the Mine and Central councils.

Ideas on the proper type of pin to be designed may be submitted for approval at the next meeting of the Central Council, December 27. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 5, 1924

This is the portal marking the main entrance to the coal mining camp of Carbonado, recently acquired by the Pacific Coast Coal Company. The camp is beautifully situated on the Carbon River, just off the main road to the Carbon Glacier on the north slope of majestic Mt. Rainier. Carbonado is approximately 50 miles from Seattle, on the Northern Pacific Railway, the tracks of which appear in the foreground. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1924

Though this is Black Diamond’s first soccer team, the boys are attracting considerable attention in the Washington State Football Association this season. Next Sunday they meet the Newcastle eleven on the latter’s field in the elimination playoff for the state cup. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 24, 1924

Situated one block east of the main highway which runs through Burnett is the cozy little home of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Hultquist. The front yard of their place, surrounded by a neat picket fence, is one of the show spots of the camp. Its mass of flowering plants and shrubs, with climbing vines and grassy lawn forming a verdant background, presents a pleasing scene indeed. In the picture, which cannot possibly do justice to the beauty of the scene, there is shown the word “Burnett” formed from growing shrubs, behind which is a luxuriant growth of bright blossoms.

Hultquist is an American citizen and a timberman in Burnett Mine. He came to the camp on January 10, 1922, formerly having worked in Tacoma, and in the mines of Cripple Creek, Leadville, and Aspen, Colorado. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 17, 1968

A monster has reared its ugly head in this community. It is not particular whom it chooses for its victims. Its bite has crippled, maimed, and even killed. It prefers to prey on youth, but no one is immune from its grasp. Its tentacles are comprised of alcohol, glue, and narcotics. They have reached out to kill one Enumclaw youth and reduce another to a living death.

A number of people are trying to find the reasons why it is allowed to flourish here. But one thing is certain to those concerned citizens. It is here and something must be done to rid the community of its cause and effect.

Earl and Isabelle Sherwood, whose 16 year-old son died on July 9 of this year from what a King County coroner’s jury termed “consuming excessive amounts at liquor furnished by person or persons unknown,” want to do what they can to save other parents the grief they have had to bear. (more…)

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