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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 11, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. tour.

More than four hundred Seattle women, members of the Parent-Teacher Associations of the city, spent one hour and 25 minutes at the Briquet Plant of the Pacific Coast Coal Company last Monday. They were enroute to the Newcastle Mine, but the special train of six coaches stopped at the Briquet Plant long enough to enable Supt. Geo. N. Calkins and Foreman Clarence Gorst to show them the entire intricate process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets.

After following the raw Black Diamond and South Prairie coal through the plant to where it emerged a perfectly blended fuel in the form of briquets, the party paused by this storage pile of 12,000 tons to have its picture taken. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 28, 1925

Black Diamond justly feels proud of its splendid baseball park and athletic field, with its commodious grandstand and band pavilion. Both the infield and the outfield are grass sod, making it a very fast diamond. Within the park enclosure is a large grove of trees providing facilities for picnic parties, and back of the grandstand tennis courts are being constructed.

All of the work in the park was performed by volunteers, making it in the fullest sense a community enterprise. This picture was taken on the day of the opening game, when Black Diamond and the Seattle Briquets played 16 innings before the contest ended with a score of 2 to 1 in favor of the Seattle nine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 21, 1925

When Portland, Oregon, recently held its Home Beautiful Exposition, Ralph C. Dean, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Portland Depot, lost no time in demonstrating to the citizens of the Columbia River metropolis that Diamond Briquets were the ideal fuel to make beautiful homes comfortable as well.

This picture shows the booth which was arranged by R.R. English, city salesman, and which carried the message of Diamond Briquets to many Portland homes. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 14, 1925

Under the baton of Bandmaster Henry Carroll, the Black Diamond and Newcastle bands of the Pacific Coast Coal Company journeyed to Bellingham last week, where they participated in the celebration of the Sixth Annual Tulip Festival.

The two bands combined, made a musical organization of thirty-six pieces, and attired in miners’ caps they presented a fine and distinctive appearance. In the upper portion of the halftone they are shown lined up just before the big parade, while below the Bulletin photographer caught them in action. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 16, 1925

Thousands of Diamond Briquets have been shipped into the Yakima Valley this spring to protect the blossoming fruit trees from damage due to killing frosts. Throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington more than one hundred thousand briquet heaters are now playing their part in the production of bumper crops by radiating the warm glow of red hot briquets against the heretofore invulnerable attacks of Jack Frost.

The scene depicted herewith shows a shipment of Diamond Briquets being unloaded at the yards of Western Fuel Company in Yakima. The trucks are loading fuel to go to the orchards. At the same time, while being so extensively burned in the fruit districts, briquets are continuing to grow in popularity for use in logging operations and for steam shovel use, to say nothing of domestic demand. (more…)

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