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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 12, 1924

Summer time in Juneau, Alaska, is not the most favorable season in which to sell coal to the domestic consumer. But the view shown herewith of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Juneau depot, taken in the month of July, shows not a truck in sight. This is because Agent H.G. Walmsley had them all out making deliveries, even though the mid-day sun made a shady corner most inviting. “Walms” was formerly a company employee at Newcastle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 5, 1924

Getting the best results at the lowest cost from the proper burning of coal was the theme of the appeal made by the Washington Coal Producers’ Association in its exhibit at the recent Merchants’ Convention in Seattle. Using the slogan, “There’s a Washington Coal for Every Purpose,” the exhibit attracted wide attention.

Pacific Coast coals and Diamond Briquets occupied prominent positions in the exhibit. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, August 31, 1988

BLACK DIAMOND — Thousands of people are expected to take a break from work at the annual Black Diamond Labor Day festival this weekend.

An adult dance opens the celebration Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., at the Black Diamond Eagles Hall. A midnight buffet will be served, and “White Water” will provide the music.

Marching bands, antique cars, children’s groups, floats, and horses will participate in Monday’s parade, which begins at 10 a.m. The parade travels on Highway 169 from Third and Lawson streets to the baseball diamond at Black Diamond Elementary School. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 31, 2002

By Desiree Lerum
For the Courier-Herald

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

Roy Dalsanto remembers as a young child going to the local church to pick up the bags of flour and sugar his family received on a welfare-type program. His father had been injured while working in the Black Diamond coal mines and the family was short on money.

Because of that, Dalsanto can identify with the people who use the services of the Enumclaw Food Bank that he runs. He enjoys giving people the help they need through the food bank.

“My family needed help and I like to help others,” he said. (more…)

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With the arrival of hot summer weather attention is again drawn to the fact that there are many residents of Black Diamond who have no effective means of disposing of garbage. At the last Mine Council meeting a move was instituted to improve the sanitary condition of the camp by asking everybody to provide themselves with garbage cans.

The company will provide a means for regularly disposing of all garbage deposited in cans, free of cost, and in order to make the entire camp fully sanitary it is absolutely necessary that every house be equipped with the proper type of garbage can. These may be obtained through the company store, and in case they are not installed promptly, steps will be taken to compel every resident to so equip his place.

At both Newcastle and Burnett every house is equipped with a garbage can and the menace of typhoid and contagion thereby greatly minimized. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 7, 1978

The following material has been presented to the Voice by Ann Phinney after the sale of the Phinney part of the “Burtenshaw property” they owned many years.

“This is the history of the Burtenshaw homestead as written by the oldest daughter, Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian, and given to us July 6, 1953, after we bought the homestead in the summer of 1951,” Mrs. Phinney says.

By Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

William A. Burtenshaw came to Washington Territory from Oregon, driving a team of horses across the country by the Overland route.

During the winter of 1884 he drove the first team of horses into Maple Valley, where previous to this time there were but two yoke of oxen.

He filed on the homestead of 120 acres situated twelve miles east of Renton (This land extended up to and included the little house, which used to be the Shaw’s store, by the now Junior High—note by AHP.)

The family lived in a tent two years. In 1886 he built the first house. Soon after that he built the first part of the barn. A few years later he added the larger part. (more…)

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