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Posts Tagged ‘churches’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 24, 1924

Situated one block east of the main highway which runs through Burnett is the cozy little home of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Hultquist. The front yard of their place, surrounded by a neat picket fence, is one of the show spots of the camp. Its mass of flowering plants and shrubs, with climbing vines and grassy lawn forming a verdant background, presents a pleasing scene indeed. In the picture, which cannot possibly do justice to the beauty of the scene, there is shown the word “Burnett” formed from growing shrubs, behind which is a luxuriant growth of bright blossoms.

Hultquist is an American citizen and a timberman in Burnett Mine. He came to the camp on January 10, 1922, formerly having worked in Tacoma, and in the mines of Cripple Creek, Leadville, and Aspen, Colorado. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 17, 1968

A monster has reared its ugly head in this community. It is not particular whom it chooses for its victims. Its bite has crippled, maimed, and even killed. It prefers to prey on youth, but no one is immune from its grasp. Its tentacles are comprised of alcohol, glue, and narcotics. They have reached out to kill one Enumclaw youth and reduce another to a living death.

A number of people are trying to find the reasons why it is allowed to flourish here. But one thing is certain to those concerned citizens. It is here and something must be done to rid the community of its cause and effect.

Earl and Isabelle Sherwood, whose 16 year-old son died on July 9 of this year from what a King County coroner’s jury termed “consuming excessive amounts at liquor furnished by person or persons unknown,” want to do what they can to save other parents the grief they have had to bear. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 10, 1924

Seldom are train robbers obliging enough to pose for a photograph, but down at San Luis Obispo, California, the Pacific Coast Railway Company’s “Valley Flier” was recently held up by a band of armed men at Exposition Grounds station, just outside of San Luis Obispo, and this picture attests the fact that there was a photographer in the vicinity. The Rotary Club emblem on the rear coach, however, calls for an explanation.

The train carried a party of Rotarians from Santa Maria and the two-gun bandit in cowboy attire was none other than W.T. Masengill, superintendent of the Pacific Coast Railway, who assisted in removing the passengers and carrying them off into the woods. The Pacific Coast Railway is a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company. (more…)

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Originally published in Valley Living, October 9, 1987

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

“Every time an old house goes, a part of me goes with it,” says Dan Palmer, shuffling through a stack of photographs of historic landmarks scattered over the Valley.

“I can take it when nature takes them, but when it’s the bulldozers…,” Palmer’s voice softens in regret.

Palmer, a folk musician and craftsman by trade, really started getting serious about Valley history when he moved to Black Diamond. And as his interest grew, he started accumulating articles and books on the area’s roots and mounting his own collection of photographs of buildings still standing and the overgrown remnants of a boisterous coal mining past. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 26, 1924

Diamond Briquets were recently given wide and favorable publicity in Juneau, Alaska, when Harold Lloyd appeared in the film feature, Why Worry, at one of the Juneau theatres. H.G. Walmsley, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s depot at the Alaskan capital, arranged with the exhibitors of this picture to place fifteen of these 16-foot signs about the city.

Dealers handling Diamond Briquets, from Skagway, Alaska, in the north, to Hornbrook, California, in the south, all report no worries with this popular fuel. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 12, 1924

Summer time in Juneau, Alaska, is not the most favorable season in which to sell coal to the domestic consumer. But the view shown herewith of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Juneau depot, taken in the month of July, shows not a truck in sight. This is because Agent H.G. Walmsley had them all out making deliveries, even though the mid-day sun made a shady corner most inviting. “Walms” was formerly a company employee at Newcastle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 5, 1924

Getting the best results at the lowest cost from the proper burning of coal was the theme of the appeal made by the Washington Coal Producers’ Association in its exhibit at the recent Merchants’ Convention in Seattle. Using the slogan, “There’s a Washington Coal for Every Purpose,” the exhibit attracted wide attention.

Pacific Coast coals and Diamond Briquets occupied prominent positions in the exhibit. (more…)

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