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Posts Tagged ‘churches’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 7, 1978

The following material has been presented to the Voice by Ann Phinney after the sale of the Phinney part of the “Burtenshaw property” they owned many years.

“This is the history of the Burtenshaw homestead as written by the oldest daughter, Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian, and given to us July 6, 1953, after we bought the homestead in the summer of 1951,” Mrs. Phinney says.

By Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

William A. Burtenshaw came to Washington Territory from Oregon, driving a team of horses across the country by the Overland route.

During the winter of 1884 he drove the first team of horses into Maple Valley, where previous to this time there were but two yoke of oxen.

He filed on the homestead of 120 acres situated twelve miles east of Renton (This land extended up to and included the little house, which used to be the Shaw’s store, by the now Junior High—note by AHP.)

The family lived in a tent two years. In 1886 he built the first house. Soon after that he built the first part of the barn. A few years later he added the larger part. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 6, 1924

Pacific Coast coal was used to bunker the vessels of three foreign flags within the past week. First to call was the Nazareno, an Italian freighter under charter to the Bunge Western Grain Corporation. She is shown above to the left just as the big craft was being brought alongside the bunkers for loading. Her destination after leaving Seattle was Europe, though at this writing she is ashore in the Columbia River.

The center picture shows the Wilhelm Hemsoth, a German ship, taking Black Diamond and South Prairie bunker coal. She sails this week for Australia.

At the right the graceful lines of the British freighter, Dramatist, show up to good advantage as she pulls out for Glasgow. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 30, 1924

One institution of which Burnett is justly proud is the company store, a picture of which is herewith shown. L.W. Foreman is the capable and accommodating manager of the store and with his efficient corps of helpers he is making it an institution of real service to the camp.

A prompt delivery service is maintained, which with the high quality of the merchandise carried, is another one of the reasons for the general appeal of the company store to all residents of Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 24, 1978

By Deanne Tollefson

Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church

To learn more about the history of the church go to http://www.svlccommunity.org/about-us.html#history

It was a joyous occasion for members of the five-year-old Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church when the congregation held the first church service in their new building. For the past five-and-a-half years, worship services and Sunday school have been held in Cedar River Elementary School.

The new building, located at 21614 238th Pl. S.E. (one fourth mile west of Tahoma Junior High off 216th), has been under construction for three years, the work being done largely by volunteer labor. The church is to be the worship and education center, and houses offices, a library/fireside room, and a kitchen. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1980

By Cathy Reiner
south Times bureau

Scoutmaster Lyle Lewis works on a canoe with Joe Taylor, left, and Robert Wraith.

Scoutmaster Lyle Lewis works on a canoe with Joe Taylor, left, and Robert Wraith.

MAPLE VALLEY — “Boom-crunch, boom-crunch-crackle-boom!”

In the echoing garage the noise was almost deafening as Lyle Lewis and three members of Boy Scout Post 711 beat their rubber mallets on a misshapen fiberglass form.

“Boom-thump-crunch-boom!”

An unusual Scout ceremony? No, just the birth of another of the troop’s canoes.

“That’s it,” Joe Taylor, 17, announced with a grin. “Pull ’er off.”

Scoutmaster Lyle Lewis eased a wedge between the form and the yellow fiberglass skin and began pulling from the edge. There was a shudder and a pop and suddenly the form was on the ground. Underneath, a bright yellow canoe was born.

“That’s number 12,” Lewis said with satisfaction. “It’s ready to send home for finishing work.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, May 18, 1880

One of the most convincing proofs of the steady growth and prosperity of our territory is to be found in the development and increased capacity of our coal mines. And, for an example we will take one, near at hand—the Newcastle mine—situated near Lake Washington, in the central portion of our county to demonstrate this proposition. (more…)

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