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Posts Tagged ‘Green River’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 15, 1906

Milwaukee practically forced to take Snoqualmie Pass and preparatory measures are all along that line

Three-mile tunnel from point near head of Lake Keechelus would insure a maximum grade of about 1 percent

Extensive coal fields reaching from Renton to Roslyn with gap at the summit, strong point in favor

Northern Pacific engineers laying out and building the Yakima & Valley Railroad have practically blocked the Milwaukee out of Naches Pass and forced the selection of the Snoqualmie gateway to the Sound. Coast officials of the new transcontinental line are making all their preparations for the use of Snoqualmie Pass and only a showing of impossibility in grades or some new advantage in Naches Pass will change the present plan.

As Milwaukee officials have now marked out the route for that line across this state, the road will connect either inside or just outside the city limits with the Columbia & Puget Sound following that road up through the Cedar River Valley and across to Rattlesnake Prairie up to that point the company will gain a maximum grade of 8/10 of one percent. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 11, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

When we initially talked with outgoing mayor Gomer Evans about this article, we asked that he give thought to three basic questions: “When you took office, what problems did you face?”; “What do you feel you accomplished during your term of office?”; and now, “Where do you go from here?” His description of the accomplishments clearly defines the problems faced. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 28, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

In September 1925 the Seattle Post-Intelligencer published an article about Flaming Geyser Park and its unique gas-bubbling spring. At that time it was a privately-owned facility providing campsites, stoves, restrooms, a swimming pool fed by the Green River, fish hatchery, and round picnic tables cut from six-foot sections of fir trees. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1895

Phil Early and another employee named Gibson so badly burned and injured that they died today—the cause of the explosion is not known

Tombstone of Romulous Monroe Gibson, who died in an boiler explosion at Franklin on October 3, 1895.

Tombstone of Romulous Monroe Gibson, who died in an boiler explosion at Franklin on October 3, 1895.

The Franklin mines have been the scene of another unfortunate accident by which two men lost their lives. Yesterday morning one of the boilers in a battery located at the edge of Green River, far below the mine proper, exploded, and so badly burned and injured Phil Early and a man named [Romulous Monroe] Gibson, employees, that they died today from the effects. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 28, 1888

Black Diamond, Aug. 25 – Everything is running smoothly, as usual. Shafts 14, 12, and 2 are running at their fullest capacity. Everybody is busy, and of course, happy.

School opened on Monday morning with an enrollment of 126 pupils, with more to come. If the present prosperity continues more school room will be needed shortly. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1910

Period of greatest danger passed, through spectacular and successful work of fighting forces

Departments conflict on firing great guns

William Entwistle’s force risks death in mad race to Maple Valley with auto load of dynamite

The forest fire story in brief

Two bad fires break out near standing timber reserves, King County. Forest supervisors take 200 men into woods but fail to control conflagrations.

Blaze in young timber near Scenic Hot Springs breaks all bounds and is beyond control. Forest supervisor in charge.

Town of Walsh, on Columbia & Puget Sound, badly scorched, loss including one saloon, two-story dwelling house, barn, and buildings of England’s logging camp.

Dynamite to the amount of 500 pounds taken into Maple Valley district by fire fighters, who prepare to dynamite tops of trees in old timber to stop destructive fires.

Cooler weather makes work of forest fire workers easier, but danger will continue until rains fall.

The town of Bothell, at the head of Lake Washington, which was in danger of destruction yesterday, is reported safe. No buildings were destroyed. (more…)

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