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Posts Tagged ‘Green River’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, April 12, 1914

Rebuilt sawmill costs $200,00

New plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., will begin operations June 1

Rebuilt plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., to be opened June 1.

On the site of its old plant at Selleck, Wash., which was destroyed by fire last January 3, the Pacific States Lumber Company has just completed the building of a new sawmill at a cost of about $200,000. Work now is in progress installing the machinery, and it is expected to have the mill in operation June 1, with the capacity force of 350 men. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 3, 1959

HANSON DAMSITE: At Eagle Gorge, on the Green River, 30 miles southeast of Seattle, work started today on the long-planned Howard A. Hanson Dam. The broken line indicates where the crest of the dam will cross the narrow valley, creating a lake eight miles long and impounding 106,000 acre-feet of flood waters. Poring over maps indicating the area to be covered in excavation and subsequent construction were, from left, James J. Grafton, resident engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, and two surveyors, Louis Zumek for the Army Engineers and Andrew McDermott for the Henry J. Kaiser Co. and Raymond International, joint contractors.

HANSON DAMSITE: At Eagle Gorge, on the Green River, 30 miles southeast of Seattle, work started today on the long-planned Howard A. Hanson Dam. The broken line indicates where the crest of the dam will cross the narrow valley, creating a lake eight miles long and impounding 106,000 acre-feet of flood waters. Poring over maps indicating the area to be covered in excavation and subsequent construction were, from left, James J. Grafton, resident engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, and two surveyors, Louis Zumek for the Army Engineers and Andrew McDermott for the Henry J. Kaiser Co. and Raymond International, joint contractors.

The final step in a long-deferred flood-control project, construction of the Howard A. Hanson Dam on Green River, got under way today.

Dean H. Eastman, president of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce and vice president of the Northern Pacific Railway Co., threw a switch setting off a blast of dynamite. L. Costello, member of a civic committee organized by the late Mr. Hanson to urge dam construction, moved the first shovelful of earth. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, December 16, 1921

Farmers living in the White River Valley were obliged to drive their cattle to the hills for safety.

Renton, Tukwila, and Riverton are under water and people traveling about the towns are obliged to wear hip boots or go on a raft.

Here in Enumclaw many basements were flooded by surface water but little serious damage has been done. Travel between here and Seattle on the highway was stopped by high water near Kent. That city suffered considerable from inundation.

Estimated cost of damage to roads and other losses in King County may run over $400,000.

The flood conditions have been worse than in any season for many years.

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By Betty Franz Uhrig

Correspondence dated April 11, 2008, Orinda, California

Dr. H.L. Botts

Dr. H.L. Botts

Dear BDHS,

Enjoyed the quarterly as always. I do have a Doctor Botts story. It amused me when you said, “let us know if Dr. Botts treated you for any illnesses or accidents.” I was an accident, being the last of seven children to be born to my parents, Albert and Selma Franz, who were 56 and 41 at the time.

Our family lived on 40 acres on the Green River not far from the Gorge. I was born on a Sunday night, December 6, 1936, and I’ve heard that it was a cold, snowy winter.

When my birth was imminent my father, driving a Model-T Ford, and my 18-year-old brother Art, holding a lantern, set out for Dr. Botts’ office. The doctor was attending a movie and had to be called out of the theater for the cold ride to our lantern-lit house. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 23, 1910

Blow of pick pours torrent into Occidental Mine No. 3 at Palmer, ruining coal workings

Heroes volunteer to save unlucky workman

George Brinn doomed, if not already dead, despite efforts to reach victim of rising water

Rising on the slope at the rate of eight inches an hour, water from an underground river which was tapped by the pick of George Brinn, a miner, has completely flooded Occidental Mine No. 3 at Palmer, King County, and now stands at ninety feet on the slope. Brinn is missing and doubtless lost his life when the flood descended on him and in the heroic effort of fellow miners to rescue him dead or alive, two of them, Pit Boss William Barringer and Abner Farmer, a miner, just escaped drowning. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 22, 1976

Representative Frances North of North Bend says the purchase of ten acres in the town of Black Diamond’s Green River watershed has been approved by separate state agencies that administer funds for the State Parks and Recreation Commission. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1988

By Joe Haberstroh and Margaret Bakken

The Enumclaw Plateau’s proposed community plan calls for slow growth, but some of the plan’s authors fear the proposed restrictions may freeze out people who had planned to build homes on small lots.

No one is sure how much land would be rezoned under the plan that Enumclaw Plateau residents in southeastern King County are receiving in the mail this week from King County. But sizable parcels once set aside for one-acre lots are proposed for a zone with lots 2 1/2 acres and larger. (more…)

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