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Posts Tagged ‘Green River’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 28, 1888

Black Diamond, Aug. 25 – Everything is running smoothly, as usual. Shafts 14, 12, and 2 are running at their fullest capacity. Everybody is busy, and of course, happy.

School opened on Monday morning with an enrollment of 126 pupils, with more to come. If the present prosperity continues more school room will be needed shortly. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1910

Period of greatest danger passed, through spectacular and successful work of fighting forces

Departments conflict on firing great guns

William Entwistle’s force risks death in mad race to Maple Valley with auto load of dynamite

The forest fire story in brief

Two bad fires break out near standing timber reserves, King County. Forest supervisors take 200 men into woods but fail to control conflagrations.

Blaze in young timber near Scenic Hot Springs breaks all bounds and is beyond control. Forest supervisor in charge.

Town of Walsh, on Columbia & Puget Sound, badly scorched, loss including one saloon, two-story dwelling house, barn, and buildings of England’s logging camp.

Dynamite to the amount of 500 pounds taken into Maple Valley district by fire fighters, who prepare to dynamite tops of trees in old timber to stop destructive fires.

Cooler weather makes work of forest fire workers easier, but danger will continue until rains fall.

The town of Bothell, at the head of Lake Washington, which was in danger of destruction yesterday, is reported safe. No buildings were destroyed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast magazine, June 1, 1906

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

June is the month and summer is the time in which to take a trip to Black Diamond and Franklin, Washington, for then the trees are green and blooming flowers fill the air with pleasing odors; for then the sportsman can whip the fish-filled Green River and lure the gamey trout from placid pools to repose within his basket; the birds fill the air with charming melodies; all nature smiles and glows with new and increasing life to shine in growing splendor; and, then, the grand snow-capped mountain—Mt. Rainier—looks more beautiful and lovely than at any other time of the year as it towers high above all its surroundings, a crystal gem of purest white, held in a setting of everlasting and eternal green. (more…)

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Text and photos from the Howard A. Hanson Dam dedication program, May 12, 1962

Eagle Gorge Dam was renamed Howard A. Hanson by an act of Congress 28 July 1958, introduced by Congressman Thomas M. Pelly, and signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower 6 August 1958.

Many people worked long and hard to establish a flood-control project on the Green River in King County of Western Washington. One of these was Howard A. Hanson.

In addition to his many prior years of personal effort, he was, from 1947 until his death on 4 November 1957, a leader of civic and government groups actively seeking construction of the project. He organized and directed effective action leading to contributions by the state and King County totaling $2,000.000. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 3, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

About a mile and a quarter southeasterly from Franklin and about the same distance due east from the entrance to the Pacosco Mine, is the Hyde Mine.

The Hyde Mine was originally developed by sinking a slope on Number Twelve Seam, then later a rock tunnel was driven connecting this slope with the well-known McKay Seam. This mine was opened prior to 1909, but was not extensively developed until the McKay Coal Seam was found, which was a year or two later.

Gangways were driven to the north and to the northwest, toward what is now Pacosco Mine, and gangways were also driven to the south along the strikes of both the McKay and the Number Twelve. (more…)

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