Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Green River’

Originally published in The Tacoma News Tribune, April 5, 1995

By Lisa Kremer
The News Tribune

Bob Eaton, president of the Black Diamond Historical Society, and his granddaughter Kelley Sauskojus are trying to get a miners’ cabin built in 1910 near Black Diamond designated a local historic landmark. (Peter Haley/The News Tribune.)

In 1910, two Italian men built a tiny house—barely big enough for beds, a stove, and a sink—to live in as they worked in the nearby mines of Black Diamond.

There’s not much to distinguish the house from hundreds of other small miner’s cabins that dotted the hillsides. Except that this house is still there, almost in its original condition.

Bob Eaton, president of the Black Diamond Historical Society, wants to preserve the house and designate it a local historic landmark. That would mean his granddaughter Kelley Sauskojus, who owns the cabin, could apply for state grants to repair and restore it.

But like all other South King County cities, Black Diamond doesn’t have a process to officially designate its local landmarks.

It’s so difficult to designate city landmarks that only two cities in King County—Seattle and Bothell—have done so, said Charlie Sundberg, a preservation planner with the King County Historic Preservation program. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 3, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

Kummer coal/clay bunkers (November 13, 1951 #262106-9022) This coal/clay bunker or storage/ processing facility is believed to have been built in 1944 by the Kummer Coal Company and was later operated by the Johnson Coal Company and Palmer Coking Coal Co., Inc. Its capacity was listed as 150 tons. It was originally built as a coal bunker, but later used for clay. The Kummer mine was unique in that both coal and fire clay were mined. Following mining, slabs of mill end wood were laid on the ground and covered first with coal and then with freshly mined clay. The wood/coal base was set on fire and the clay was burned to rid it of carbon contaminants. The resulting clay was sold to Gladding McBean in Renton for the production of bricks. The Kummer clay beds were founded by Jacob Sants on August 15, 1888, and named for George Kummer, ceramist for the Denny Clay Company. This site is located south of the Green River and west of SR-169 on property now owned by Washington State Parks and Recreation in Section 26-21-6. (Note: King County Assessor photo.) From “When Coal Was King,” April 7, 2009, by Bill Kombol.

Though the clay and coal mining town of Kummer no longer exists, motorists traveling out of Black Diamond today may turn right on to S.E. 352th from the Maple Valley highway and cross the Green River on what the locals still refer to as the “Kummer bridge.”

William Kombol, Palmer Coking Coal Co. explains some of the history, “In addition to their appetite for coal, the growing cities of the Puget Sound also needed deposits of clay, one of the prime ingredients in paving and building bricks. Clay was first discovered in this area near Kummer (an area now occupied by Flaming Geyser State Park) by Jacob Sant in 1888.

The deposit and the town were named for George Kummer, a ceramist and engineer for the Denny Clay Company. In 1905, two local companies joined to form the Denny-Renton Clay & Coal Company which by 1917 was producing 58 million bricks per year. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 11, 1998

Tacoma utility, state ecology agency reach agreement

By Paul Schmidt
The Courier-Herald

After trying to circumvent legal roadblocks through the state Legislature, Black Diamond is in line to receive some of the water needed for future growth.

A tentative agreement in principle reached recently outside Olympia between Tacoma Public Utilities, the state Department of Ecology, and the City of Black Diamond could provide 500,000 gallons per day for five to 10 years. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

Read Full Post »

A ritzy development cuts a deal to take water from Puget Sound cities and endangered salmon

Originally published in Seattle Weekly, March 5, 1998

By Chris Carrel

The DOE insists taking more of the Green River’s scarce water for a golf course won’t hurt its struggling salmon.

The endangered-species listing proposed last week for Puget Sound chinook salmon served official notice that Pugetopolis’ sprawl-as-usual is incompatible with healthy salmon runs. In response, legislators pledged serious salmon-recovery legislation for next session.

A proposal in the current session to divert water from salmon streams to luxury homes in southeast King County has highlighted the difficult politics of balancing development with salmon. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Tacoma News Tribune, February 19, 1998

Bill would give Black Diamond permit it has been denied 3 times

By Leslie Brown
The News Tribune

Black Diamond development: Black Diamond Associates’ 1,600-home development would sit on 750 acres recently annexed by the city. The project is on hold because the city doesn’t have enough water. (Ronnie Ashlock/The News Tribune)

After failing at every level to obtain a water permit for 1,600 new homes in Black Diamond, developers finally have found a sympathetic and powerful ear in the Legislature.

A bill that would give the City of Black Diamond a “temporary” water permit—the very one the state Ecology Department denied developers three years ago passed the House 55-42 last week. It is now pending before the Senate.

Critics are decrying House Bill 2800, sponsored by Rep. Jack Cairnes (R-Covington) as special-interest legislation, bad water policy, and an end-run around a three-tiered administrative process that gave the developers ample review.

“This bill is not really intended to secure a (water) supply for the existing population of the area,” Ecology Department water resources manager Keith Phillips wrote to the House Agriculture and Ecology Committee. “Rather, it is intended to secure a supply for a large, new land development nearby.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, February 18, 1998

Pending rate increase would provide funds for much-needed improvements, say city officials

By Paul Schmidt
The Courier-Herald

Dan DalSanto scans the surrounding landscape after returning from a trip across the Green River over a suspension bridge that carries Black Diamond’s water supply. (Photo by Paul Schmidt)

For years Black Diamond officials have postponed most major improvements to the city’s water system, firm in their hope they would eventually tap into a new, high-capacity, Tacoma-owned water line.

Money spent for a larger reservoir and related components would be redundant, especially with the long-planned Pipeline 5 in the future, its route designed to cut through the middle of town.

So went the thinking, says Public Works Director Dan DalSanto.

Pipeline 5’s future is now in some doubt with the endangered species listing of Puget Sound Chinook salmon. But having waited all these years for the pipeline to arrive, Black Diamond finds itself with a water system fast needing improvements and expanded capacity. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »