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Posts Tagged ‘Green River’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 17, 1891

J.C. Dillon crushed to death by a railroad train in a peculiar manner

Palmer, May 16 (Special) — While J.C. Dillon was at work on the track at Palmer station Friday morning the overland train came along unexpectedly.

He jumped out of the way and struck against a tripod which had been left close to the track with point toward it, so that there was only just room for cars to pass. He was crushed to death between the cars and tripod, the pulley block being jammed into his back.


Palmer was originally a telegraph station on the Northern Pacific Railway opened during the construction of the railway’s line across Stampede Pass circa 1886.

Between 1899 and 1900 the Northern Pacific built a cut-off from Palmer Junction (just east of Palmer), crossing the Green River to Kanaskat, and thence westward to Ravensdale, Covington, and finally Auburn.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 16, 1924

Now in its third successful year of operation, the Mine Council system of collective bargaining as worked out by the employees and officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company is functioning to the entire satisfaction of all parties concerned. The group shown herewith is the Central Council, composed of representatives from each of the Mine Councils, which meets in Seattle once each month. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 2, 1979

By Kurt HildeBrandt

Maple Valley volunteer firemen have taken on the task of restoring this dilapidated old Howard Cooper engine into the smart, shining vehicle it was when it served Maple Valley back in the early 1950s.

Maple Valley volunteer firemen have taken on the task of restoring this dilapidated old Howard Cooper engine into the smart, shining vehicle it was when it served Maple Valley back in the early 1950s.

Many hours of volunteer work by members of the Maple Valley Volunteer Fire Fighters Association will be involved before the old 1926 Howard Cooper can be restored to the polished original condition by which it was known when it served as Maple Valley’s first fire engine back in the early 1950s.

When restoration has been completed, hopefully by 1981, the old fire truck should be a source of pride and historical significance to the entire greater Maple Valley community. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 26, 1989

Homes and revenue for the City of Black Diamond could be on the way again, because the Black Diamond Lake annexation that was killed in September may see new life.

Majority property owner John Walker, on a recent visit from Florida, said he and the City of Black Diamond are in the “conversation stages” of a possible proposal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Washington State Historical Society’s quarterly journal, Columbia, Spring 1994

By John Hanscom

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Bird’s-eye-view map of Franklin Mine and its environs, c. 1890. (Courtesy of Don Mason and the Black Diamond Historical Society.)

Henry Villard launched the Oregon Improvement Company in October 1880 as part of his grand scheme to dominate the development of the Pacific Northwest. By 1883 he had tied the area to the national economy with the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Expansive development of the Pacific Northwest seemed assured.

To fuel Villard’s steamships and locomotives, a dependable coal supply was a high priority. By February 1881 the Oregon Improvement Company had acquired the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company, including the Newcastle Mine east of Lake Washington, at a cost of one million dollars. The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad (renamed the Columbia and Puget Sound) was also purchased for over half a million dollars to transport coal from mine to Seattle bunkers. Villard hired John L. Howard under a five-year contract at $10,000 per year as general manager of the coal business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 11, 2016

By Bill Kombol

With the Major League Baseball [season] ready to begin, it’s fun to look back over 100 years to a women’s baseball team which played for Ravensdale.

Though baseball and soccer were big sports for coal miners representing their respective mining towns, the ladies also took up bat and glove. According to Barbara Nilson’s Ravensdale Reflections, baseball games were played every Sunday at a rough field on the Landsburg Road just across from the Markus store, now known as the Ravensdale Market. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 22, 1978

This big “mountain” behind the Hi-Lo shopping area in Black Diamond is a rock dump from coal mining operations of material “unusable at the present time,” Palmer Coal Company officials say. Any coal bed will consist of the coal plus layers of clay or high ash carbonaceous material which will have to be discarded to achieve a certain standard of quality for the salable product, and that is what this pile is. The pile grew between 1945 and two or three years ago. Other methods of discarding material are now being used. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

This big “mountain” behind the Hi-Lo shopping area in Black Diamond is a rock dump from coal mining operations of material “unusable at the present time,” Palmer Coal Company officials say. Any coal bed will consist of the coal plus layers of clay or high ash carbonaceous material which will have to be discarded to achieve a certain standard of quality for the salable product, and that is what this pile is. The pile grew between 1945 and two or three years ago. Other methods of discarding material are now being used. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

“Don’t buy your miner’s lamp yet!” Hugh McIntosh, public information manager for Seattle City Light, cautioned the Voice last week.

He referred to recently published reports regarding the possibility of reopening mining operations in the Green River coal fields, including the old mining towns of Black Diamond, Morganville, and Franklin. (more…)

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