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Posts Tagged ‘dances’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 24, 1963

By Matt Miletich

Bill Peacock, a colorful Hobart-Maple Valley old-timer, paused in his house-wrecking chores to tell how much he loves his life and work.

Bill Peacock, a colorful Hobart-Maple Valley old-timer, paused in his house-wrecking chores to tell how much he loves his life and work. (Times photo by Roy Scully.)

They must have thrown away the mold after they made Bill Peacock, one of Hobart’s oldest old-timers.

At 78, Peacock is a happy and hustlin’ eager beaver. “I consider myself a 78-year-old kid,” Peacock says.

Peacock, who began “adult” life at 13 butchering cattle, has been keeping busy recently wrecking an old house at 204 Minor Av. N. Wielding a sledge hammer, peavey, and crowbar, he gives all he’s got to tearing apart the old timbers.

Peacock acquired the house from a friend. Peacock is salvaging the lumber and materials and having them hauled to his seven-acre farm at Hobart, where he plans to erect some buildings.

Bill has batched on the acreage since the death in February of his wife, Rose. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 22, 1923

One week from today, Thanksgiving Day, there is promised a royal feed at each of the camps when the dinner gong sounds at the hotels.

In common with all Americans the custom of dining on the toothsome turkey will hold full sway. Judging from the array of savory viands listed on the Thanksgiving menu there is going to be plenty to go round with a second helping for everybody.

At Newcastle plans are already well under way by Chef Geo. W. Blake and his corps of able assistants, and when the big day arrives there is certain to be a crowd of hungry diners ready to start the chorus of “Please pass the turkey.”

Chef Emil Bernhard at Burnett believes not only in preparing a feast for the inner man but he invariably accompanies it with a feast of beauty for the eye, and his tables promise to be groaning with the weight of good things.

At Black Diamond the hotel diners are anxiously awaiting the spread which Chef J.P. Whelan has in store, which all agree will be complete from soup to nuts. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 8, 1923

October was a banner month in the production department, and demonstrated that the mines and the new forces are prepared to do their part at any time the coal market returns to normal.

All previous production per man per day records were exceeded at Black Diamond, Burnett, and Newcastle, and at Burnett the total hoist for the month passed anything in the history of the mine.

These gratifying results were achieved because every man from the highest supervisor to the lowest laborer was on his toes and because everyone took an intense and a sincere interest in doing his particular part in showing what “we” can do. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS newsletter, The Bugle, October 1991

(Some of the old-timers of Maple Valley have been asked to write down recollections of earlier days. Most of what I recall is family history and there are times I cannot trust my memory. Also, much of it reflects a child’s point of view. Even my sister Ruth and I have entirely different recollections.)Inez (Williams) Merritt

1927 Tahoma High School. Inez Williams is in the second row, fourteenth from the left. (Courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society.)

1927 Tahoma High School. Inez Williams is in the second row, fourteenth from the left. (Courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society.)

My father, Roger Williams, became disabled in the summer of 1925 with what was diagnosed as inflammatory rheumatism. He was staying with relatives in Renton and mother had to cope with running the farm and an infant daughter born April 8th (Ruth).

Jean was 15 years old and I was 10 years old. We were able to do the everyday chores but the haying was beyond our capabilities.

One warm day in July, a parade of teams (horses) and wagons of all sizes and description came through the front gate and up to the barn.

These were neighbors who cheerfully gave up a day’s work on their own farms to give us a hand. There was even a team of mules among the others. It is the hardest job anyone would want to do and the hot, dry days of summer make it even worse. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 6, 1923

Whenever it’s necessary to get something done in Newcastle there are three men who can always be depended upon to volunteer their services. Look at the picture above and see if you don’t agree that they appear capable to finish almost anything they undertake. The fourth man, the tall individual with the glasses, is John G. Schoning of the United States Bureau of Mines who can always be counted on in matters having to do with mine rescue or first aid work. The others, left to right. are: T.H. Cadwell, John Ritchie, and Thos. Rouse.

Whenever it’s necessary to get something done in Newcastle there are three men who can always be depended upon to volunteer their services. Look at the picture above and see if you don’t agree that they appear capable to finish almost anything they undertake. The fourth man, the tall individual with the glasses, is John G. Schoning of the United States Bureau of Mines who can always be counted on in matters having to do with mine rescue or first aid work. The others, left to right. are: T.H. Cadwell, John Ritchie, and Thos. Rouse.

Competing against teams from 27 states, including the crack organizations of the central coal fields which have been in training for years, the Black Diamond Mine Rescue and First Aid Team, under the leadership of Capt. B.F. Snook won third prize at the International First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet at Salt Lake City on August 27, 28, and 29.

This rating was based on the combination scores made by the contesting teams in both first aid and mine rescue work.

Highest honors went to a team from Benton, Illinois, while the Independent Coke & Coal Company’s team from Kenilworth, Utah, took second place. A team from Mexico, representing the Real Del Monte y Pachuca Co., won third place in the mine rescue contest, the first and second team in the combination score also retaining the same standing in the mine rescue contest.

The Anaconda Copper Mining Company of Great Falls, Mont., won first place in the first aid contest, with two Virginia teams taking the next two prizes.

Black Diamond’s rating which placed the team in third position on the combination score earned a silver cup for the boys, as well as two state championship banners for mine rescue and first aid work. They were also awarded bronze medallions and were royally entertained while in Salt Lake City.

The team returned to camp last Saturday where each member was accorded a rousing welcome by company officials and friends in the camp. Credit for the remarkable showing made by the team is, without doubt, due largely to the untiring efforts of B.F. Snook, captain of the organization. He labored ceaselessly from the time he went to Black Diamond last April up to the day of the meet to produce a prize winning team. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 30, 1923

When Dr. Edward T. Devine, member of the United States Coal Commission, visited the coal mining districts of the West last week, he spent one day on a tour of the mines in King and Pierce counties.

In the group above he is shown at Burnett with a number of Pacific Coast Coal Company employees, who, with Vice President N.D. Moore and Manager of Mines D.C. Botting, accompanied him on his visit to Newcastle, Black Diamond, and Burnett, as well as to Carbonado and Wilkeson. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 23, 1923

Three teams, representing Newcastle, Burnett, and Black Diamond, respectively, contested for honors at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet held in Newcastle last Saturday, August 18.

Above, the personnel of all three teams is shown, just prior to beginning the first aid problems. Below, the victorious Black Diamond team and the Du Pont and William M. Barnum cups which they won. Black Diamond’s score in the first aid events was 96.4, and in the mine rescue events, 95, making a combined score of 95.7.

Members of the winning team are: Edw. Hale, D.D. Jones, Capt. B.F. Snook, A.G. Wallace, Jack Nichols and Richard Evered. They leave for Salt Lake City, Friday at 3:30 p.m., to compete in the International First Aid Meet on August 26, 27, and 28. (more…)

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