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Posts Tagged ‘dances’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 16, 1923

Holiday declared and mine will close for day

All roads lead to Newcastle next Saturday, August 15, where on that occasion the first aid and mine rescue teams of Black Diamond, Burnett, and Newcastle will contest for honors, the wining team to have the privilege of representing the Pacific Coast Coal Company at the International First Aid Meet in Salt Lake City on August 26, 27, and 28.

To give everyone an opportunity to take part in the festivities in connection with the meet, the company has declared the day a holiday, and the mines, company stores, and other activities will be closed all day. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 10, 1924

Newcastle ‘Babettes’ win over long-tressed rivals

Hundreds of coal miners and their families cheer participants as Bellingham wins event

Mine Rescue Team No. 1, Newcastle. (Top row, left to right): H.R Bates, W.N. Roderick (captain), and A.L. Richards. (Bottom row): Dick Owens and S.A. McNeely.

Mine Rescue Team No. 1, Newcastle. (Top row, left to right): H.R Bates, W.N. Roderick (captain), and A.L. Richards. (Bottom row): Dick Owens and S.A. McNeely.

Bellingham and Newcastle divided first honors in the largest first aid and mine rescue meeting ever staged in the state at Carbonado yesterday when twenty-five teams, representing six coal mining towns, competed in contests held under the auspices of the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Association.

About a thousand persons, most of them coal miners and members of their families from the competing camps, witnessed the contests and cheered the participants with all the enthusiasm of spectators at a big field and track meet. The meet is an annual affair, staged by the mine operators and coal mine workers.

Bellingham took first prize in the mine rescue contest, in which interest centered not only because an efficient mine rescue team is the pride of every coal camp and its main dependence in case of mine disaster, but also because such contests are spectacular to a degree. Newcastle was second and Carbonado third. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 2, 1923

When the photographer for the Bulletin last Thursday asked a group of Newcastle boys how many of them expected to attend the Elks’ big picnic in Woodland Park the next day, every one of the bunch answered with an emphatic, “I do.”

Because there are but thirteen boys in the picture shown above, it doesn’t necessarily indicate that was the size of the Newcastle delegation, which in fact totaled thirty-five, out of a possible thirty-four figured on by Welfare Director R.R. Sterling. The boys you don’t see in the picture were home hunting up the overalls with the biggest pockets and fewest holes, in which to stow away the promised peanuts.

Every boy in the picture is looking just like he did when President Harding stepped up to say “Howdy” at the picnic. At least that’s the way the photographer asked them to look. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 3, 1974

No sooner is the 4th of July over than Black Diamondites and their neighbors begin thinking seriously of that community’s annual Labor Day festivities and this year is no exception.

Needed immediately are candidates for Queen. Any girl, 14 to 18 years of age, who wishes to contend for this honor is asked to call Sandra Bartley at 886-2358.

Candidates who sell the most Labor Day buttons will be named as Queen and members of the Royal Court and each buyer of a button will receive a chance on a drawing. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 28, 1922

By James A. Maltby

Burnett Team in front of “outdoor mine.”

Burnett Team in front of “outdoor mine.”

On the hillside back of the mine office, last week, was constructed the beginning of what might be called an “outdoor mine.” It consisted of a “chute” made of boards, a cleared space for a counter, another cleared space for a second “chute,” and a path where the gangway was to run—all to be enclosed in boards instead of being underground and enclosed in earth.

“That?” said A.L. McBlaine, who was looking after the construction. “That’s for our Mine Rescue Team. We’re building the ‘mine’ so us to reproduce conditions underground, so far as possible. The men will train in it under gas, handle a stretcher, rescue men, and get thoroughly acquainted with their apparatus.” (more…)

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(This is the ninth of a series of articles describing the weekend tours of Joe and Janice Krenmayr of Seattle, who are renewing acquaintance with their home county after nearly five years in Central and South America.)

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 8, 1952

Fishing and boating are but two of the many amusements offered at Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness Lodge.

Fishing and boating are but two of the many amusements offered at Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness Lodge.

By Janice Krenmayr

Fortunately for us there are any number of little lakes and pleasure resorts within a short distance of Seattle. For Joe, enmeshed in some household remodeling, had time for only a quick trip on Weekend No. 9.

Lake Wilderness, 12 miles east of Renton and Kent, was within that range. Many years ago we’d had fun on an office picnic here, but now we stood on the boating dock at Gaffney’s Grove, a little startled at the changes. The riding stables, baseball diamond, roller rink, dance hall, horseshoe pits … were they there before? There seemed to be many more cottages, too.

Despite its growth in popularity the little lake still retains the atmosphere which must have inspired its name. Set plump in the middle of thick woods, the shimmering green water seems to be trying to push back the trees that crowd to its very edge. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 5, 1923

burnett-firebossesAnyone having an idea that the firebosses and other supervisory officials at Burnett Mine are a bunch of lounge lizards and pink tea hounds with nothing to do but check in on the job and stick around until the whistle blows each day, should be on hand when the day shift comes off.

With the help of Supt. Bob Simpson, the Bulletin photographer last week rounded up the firebosses and foremen as they came off the day shift from underground, and the photograph shown above is proof positive that they’re a bunch of hard hitters. (more…)

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