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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Coal Co.’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 11, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Left to right: Conrad “Coke” Roberts (Class of ’41) and Joe Zumek (Class of ’43) look forward to meeting up with classmates they have not seen in many years as well as meeting other Black Diamond High School graduates for the first time.

Little did they know that when 36 students entered first grade in September 1931, the graduating class of 1943 would be the last class to graduate from Black Diamond High School. In honor of the Class of 1943 as well as commemorating the closing of the high school, over 70 Black Diamond graduates from its various graduating classes will be gathering once again to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the last class to graduate from Black Diamond High School.

Schoolmates from as far away as Las Vegas, California, Idaho, and Oregon will be making the trip to reminisce of days gone by. Two of those in attendance (both from the class of 1926) will include Ruby (Favro) Keeney, 96, of Enumclaw, and Ernesta (Franchini) Van der Heyden, 96, from a rest home in Lake Forest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, June 9, 1992

By Mike Archbold

For Diane Boxx, the toughest call was the dead baby.

“It was the first time I ever cried on a call,” she told me. Even now, years later, the telling of it is painful. Her voice broke ever so slightly. There was a tightening around her eyes.

The child was a victim of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. “We worked on the baby. We had called the medics,” she said. “The hardest part was knowing we couldn’t bring the baby back.”

One of her best calls was another infant. The 45-year-old mother of two helped deliver the baby who had decided to enter the world a bit early. “We were all on Cloud 9 after that,” she said with a smile. In fact, she and her fellow volunteer firefighters have delivered three babies, she said proudly.

For those who deal with death all the time, dealing with life is an honor, incidents to be celebrated and savored. (more…)

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Originally published in the News Journal, May 29, 1998

Building survey finds rich history lurking in old structures

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Mike and Linda Deicher stand on the porch of one of Black Diamond’s refurbished historic buildings. The couple own the structure, which most recently housed an antique shop but was built as a post office in 1893 and was home to Koerner’s Drug & Confectionery store in the 1920s. (Joe Brockert/Journal)

BLACK DIAMOND — History spoke to Michael and Linda Deicher when they first saw the two-story building on Railroad Avenue in Black Diamond’s Old Town.

They liked the prominent false front facade of a turn-of-the-century commercial building and the covered porch that wrapped around two sides. Linda Deicher’s favorite architectural detail was the front wall of beveled glass windows that captures the light and frames a spectacular view of Mount Rainier. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 29, 1998

Teen drivers inspire installation near school

By Dionne Searcey
Seattle Times South bureau

Sixty years ago, the roads of the Black Diamond settlement bustled with coal miners commuting to their jobs at the nearby Pacific Coast Coal Co.

But it took dozens of teens behind the wheel to inspire installation of the tiny town’s first stoplight.

Crews from King County will install a stoplight this summer outside Kentlake High School to slow the flow of teen drivers in and out of the school parking lot that clog Lake Sawyer Road. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 27, 1926

Miss Velma Hull demonstrates the Simpson Signaling Life Line, invented by Homer Blair and used for the first time at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Burnett last Saturday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 20, 1926

One of Black Diamond’s finest assets is its splendid high school with the fine student body pictured in the group shown above. In athletics, dramatics, and all school activities, there is a wonderful school spirit which largely accounts for the creditable showing made by Black Diamond High.

In addition, the high school is interested in First Aid training and has two teams which will compete in the annual Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet at Burnett next Saturday. Prof. Albert Weatherbee is the principal of the school. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1935

“Coal Week,” May 19 to 25, inclusive, will be observed in Seattle and suburban towns at the request of employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, sponsors of “More days per week—more employment” movement, it was announced today.

Seattle merchants will be furnished by the Coal Week Committee with material for educational window displays, according to George D. Allen of Black Diamond, chairman. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of Valley, May 16, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

In 1920 Fred Habenicht, holding a hand saw, supervised the unloading of the new hydraulic mine motor vehicle or pulling loaded mine cars from water level tunnel to the Continental Coal Co. bunker (in the background). It replaced mules in the mine. Miners are: 18-year-old Vern Habenicht; Bob Kingen Sr., Frenchy Ferdinand Maigre; Evor Morgan, holding the chain; and onlooker Bill Baldwin. (Photo—Habenicht collection from Ravensdale Reflections book)

Before the turn of the 20th century, coal seams ran from the shores of Lake Washington to the foot of the Cascade mountains leading to the establishment of towns at the mine sites, some of which are still in existence, i.e., Renton, Black Diamond, Cumberland, Issaquah, Wilkeson, and Ravensdale. Some linger in memory only, i.e., Franklin, Elk, Bayne, Durham, Danville, Eddyville, Taylor, and Landsburg.

From the year 1888 through 1967, there were an amazing 232 coal seams being tapped in King County and operated by 157 different companies. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 13, 1926

Scenes in the Garden of Eden could not have been more attractive than are the orchards of Wenatchee and Eastern Washington each spring when the apple trees are in full blossom. Against a background of jagged, snow-capped peaks, and nestled in the soft green of verdant clover and alfalfa, the exquisite beauty of the pale pink and white blossoms is beyond compare.

Until recently the orchardist was helpless against the blighting touch of late spring frosts, but thanks to the introduction of Diamond Briquets he is now able to protect his blossoming trees by heating his orchard. The picture shows a typical scene in the Wenatchee Valley. (Photo copyright by J.D. Wheeler.) (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 6, 1926

Thirteen years ago, in the year 1913, Black Diamond boasted a juvenile First Aid Team of which Al McBlaine, now master mechanic at Burnett, was the coach. The halftone shown herewith was made from a rather faded photograph in the possession of Supt. Paul Gallagher, of Black Diamond. But one member of this team, Paul J. Gallagher, is now in the employ of the company. Edwin Swanson, another member of the team, is a brother of Mrs. Elsie Upton, of the Accounting Department.

These First Aid boys, in Boy Scout uniforms, are still remembered for their participation in the famous Preparedness Day parade in Seattle before this country entered the World War. Those in the picture, from left to right, are; Jack Mitchell, Laurence Plano, Edwin Swanson, Donald Weston, Paul J. Gallagher, and Wm. Morgan. (more…)

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