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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Coal Co.’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 18, 1923

When those who had gathered at Burnett last Thursday, to attend the monthly meeting of the Store Department, checked up after all were seated around the dinner table it was discovered that all records had been broken in the number attending, a count showing 52 present. After an excellent dinner, prepared and served by Chef Emil Bernhard and his assistants, an instructive and enjoyable program of talks was attentively listened to.

J.C. Hinckley of the West Coast Grocery Co., Tacoma, led off with a very able talk of an inspirational nature. He was followed by L.W. Foreman, the new manager of Burnett store, who briefly outlined his program for the development of trade. R.A. Krebs, manager of Newcastle store, then read a paper dealing with salesmanship, which was followed by a talk on “Some Knotty Problems” by H.M. McDowell, manager of Black Diamond store. McDowell’s talk provoked an extended discussion of various problems met with daily in the company stores. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 11, 1923

Thirteen years ago the present rock dump of Mine 11, at Black Diamond, was begun. Though the mine had been in operation for many years prior to 1910, it was then that the present dump was started when the old dump caught fire. This dump is today an imposing pile of rock and waste material brought out of the mine, and it is constantly growing.

Like a small mountain it rises out of the wide expanse of the valley and is visible for a considerable distance. At night the numerous fires which blaze constantly from its base to its summit make it loom up much after the manner of the biblical Pillar of Fire. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 4, 1923

Indication of the wide-spreading use of Diamond Briquets is seen in the growing demand for this fuel for consumption in the smudge pots of Yakima Valley orchards. Each spring, during the budding and blossoming season, Yakima orchardists strive to save their crops from the ravages of late frosts by the use of smudge pots placed beneath the flower-laden trees. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1919

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road fronting the building is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road in the foreground is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

After a fight with the Board of County Commissioners that has lasted twelve years, the residents of Bartram Junction, three miles northeast of Renton on the Newcastle branch of the Pacific Coast Railroad, are to have a road outlet to the highways of the county.

The county board yesterday received from the State Public Service Commission permission to construct a temporary grade crossing over the railroad and Commissioner Thomas Dobson of the North District said today that one-half of the one-mile road from the Newcastle highway to Bartram will he constructed this year and that it will be finished next spring at an approximate cost of $2,500. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 20, 1923

Several months ago a considerable shipment of Black Diamond coal was dispatched to points in Alaska and even to scattered government stations up beyond the Arctic Circle. Now the other extreme is reached, with three whalers in this week for bunkers to take them to the Antarctic.

Each of the whalers goes by the name of Star, being also numbered 1, 2, and 3. They loaded Black Diamond and South Prairie steam coal, and will sail from Seattle, via Honolulu and Australia, for the South Polar regions. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 14, 1923

Chemical discovered during war oxidizes carbon monoxide, making it harmless

For more than two hours yesterday prominent coal miners, superintendents, engineers, foremen, representatives of the State Mine Department, and of the Seattle Fire and Police Departments gathered at the federal mine rescue station at the University of Washington and took part in a demonstration of a new “self rescuer,” or small gas mask which will permit a man to live in air heavily impregnated with deadly monoxide gas from forty minutes to more than an hour.

The demonstration was made in a small room, into which the exhaust of the White mine rescue truck of the government was piped. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 6, 1923

Whenever it’s necessary to get something done in Newcastle there are three men who can always be depended upon to volunteer their services. Look at the picture above and see if you don’t agree that they appear capable to finish almost anything they undertake. The fourth man, the tall individual with the glasses, is John G. Schoning of the United States Bureau of Mines who can always be counted on in matters having to do with mine rescue or first aid work. The others, left to right. are: T.H. Cadwell, John Ritchie, and Thos. Rouse.

Whenever it’s necessary to get something done in Newcastle there are three men who can always be depended upon to volunteer their services. Look at the picture above and see if you don’t agree that they appear capable to finish almost anything they undertake. The fourth man, the tall individual with the glasses, is John G. Schoning of the United States Bureau of Mines who can always be counted on in matters having to do with mine rescue or first aid work. The others, left to right. are: T.H. Cadwell, John Ritchie, and Thos. Rouse.

Competing against teams from 27 states, including the crack organizations of the central coal fields which have been in training for years, the Black Diamond Mine Rescue and First Aid Team, under the leadership of Capt. B.F. Snook won third prize at the International First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet at Salt Lake City on August 27, 28, and 29.

This rating was based on the combination scores made by the contesting teams in both first aid and mine rescue work.

Highest honors went to a team from Benton, Illinois, while the Independent Coke & Coal Company’s team from Kenilworth, Utah, took second place. A team from Mexico, representing the Real Del Monte y Pachuca Co., won third place in the mine rescue contest, the first and second team in the combination score also retaining the same standing in the mine rescue contest.

The Anaconda Copper Mining Company of Great Falls, Mont., won first place in the first aid contest, with two Virginia teams taking the next two prizes.

Black Diamond’s rating which placed the team in third position on the combination score earned a silver cup for the boys, as well as two state championship banners for mine rescue and first aid work. They were also awarded bronze medallions and were royally entertained while in Salt Lake City.

The team returned to camp last Saturday where each member was accorded a rousing welcome by company officials and friends in the camp. Credit for the remarkable showing made by the team is, without doubt, due largely to the untiring efforts of B.F. Snook, captain of the organization. He labored ceaselessly from the time he went to Black Diamond last April up to the day of the meet to produce a prize winning team. (more…)

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