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Posts Tagged ‘King County’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 18, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

Black Diamond’s Community Service center team—they spread rays of hope and comfort. Front row: Evelyn Gronemeyer, Lee Lombardini; back row, Nonie Coby, Jan Glasscock. –Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Black Diamond’s Community Service center team—they spread rays of hope and comfort. Front row: Evelyn Gronemeyer, Lee Lombardini; back row, Nonie Coby, Jan Glasscock. –Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

It’s official—the Black Diamond Community Service Center has a new coordinator. Jan Glasscock, who has served the center as outreach worker for the past 11 months, has been hired to fill the post through next April.

The selection is most appropriate as Jan is fully aware of the needs of the community and is dedicated to meeting those needs as well as is possible.

During the next seven months, she will attempt to initiate new programs, coordinate and meet the needs of the community, and carry on the center’s crisis, alcohol, and family problem counseling. Jan can also make referrals.

She will get a lot of support from Nonie Coby, Lee Lombardini, Mary Anne Lind, and Rose Murdock. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, September 1992

By Mary Swift

Johnny Lazor has a chew in his hospital bed. (Valley Daily News photo by Gary Kissel.)

Johnny Lazor has a chew in his hospital bed. (Valley Daily News photo by Gary Kissel.)

RENTON — The Red Sox are still his favorite team, though former Red Sox player Johnny Lazor will be the first to admit they haven’t done much to cheer about this year.

Now Toronto, that’s a baseball team, Lazor says with the knowing look of a man who’s knocked clumps of sod out of his own cleats more than once in his life.

As for Seattle’s own Mariners: “They stink,” he says, wasting neither words nor sympathy.

At 80, it’s been a few decades since Lazor picked up a bat and stepped up to the plate to face a pitcher. Age has turned his hair white; time, however, hasn’t dulled the memories of his own ball-playing days.

Even as a farm kid growing up in the Taylor area in southeast King County, Lazor knew what he wanted to do. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 12, 1977

By Dianne Wilson

A week of pumping by King County has drawn Horseshoe Lake back from foundations, and the sandbag walls put up to protect them. (Photo by Marcus R. Donner)

A week of pumping by King County has drawn Horseshoe Lake back from foundations, and the sandbag walls put up to protect them. (Photo by Marcus R. Donner)

A preliminary planned unit-development that will completely surround Horseshoe Lake (currently dry), west of Black Diamond with houses, has been approved by the county zoning examiner.

William Coski’s proposed plat will involve a total of 47 acres, including about 5.5 acres of lake. The land will be divided into 33 building sites.

The lake, which lies in the middle of the Public Utility District, Coski plans to develop as a year-round facility. This required a revision in the plans originally submitted to the county to reduce the amount of development near the lake itself. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 4, 1978

Residents and neighbors of the Selleck-Kangley community in southwestern King County are calling a Townhall Meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 10 at 8 p.m. in the Selleck schoolhouse to “deal themselves into the dispute over the Selleck water system,” according to conveners of the meeting.

At the conclusion of the meeting a vote will be taken to register the consensus of the community.

Owners of the Selleck water system have been ordered by the King County Superior Court to carry out 28 directives of the King County Health Department. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1919

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road fronting the building is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road in the foreground is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

After a fight with the Board of County Commissioners that has lasted twelve years, the residents of Bartram Junction, three miles northeast of Renton on the Newcastle branch of the Pacific Coast Railroad, are to have a road outlet to the highways of the county.

The county board yesterday received from the State Public Service Commission permission to construct a temporary grade crossing over the railroad and Commissioner Thomas Dobson of the North District said today that one-half of the one-mile road from the Newcastle highway to Bartram will he constructed this year and that it will be finished next spring at an approximate cost of $2,500. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 1, 1890

In this same great county are 100,000 acres of coal lands. Their active development began twenty years ago, 4,918 tons of coal being shipped to San Francisco in 1871. From year to year the output has increased, until now in amounts to 600,000 tons, and until it has amounted in all to 3,830,000 tons since the beginning, against 2,835,000 tons from all other parts of the state combined.

The principal mines are those of Newcastle, Cedar Mountain, Black Diamond, Franklin, Gilman, and Durham, new mines being those at Black River, Kangley, and Niblock. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 27, 1978

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Maple Valley Historical Society at its Sept. 18 meeting discussed three possible buildings or sites in the area which might qualify for inclusion in the State Historical Register or for block grant restoration money.

The gymnasium at the old Hobart School site was deemed the most historically significant building in that area by Jane Wissel, King County Historic Site researcher. (more…)

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