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Posts Tagged ‘King County’

Originally published in The Issaquah Press, January 28, 2009

This was likely taken in the 1910s. It came from a book of photos of all of Pacific Coast Co. properties, including this mine property held by its subsidiary, Pacific Coast Coal Co. (Issaquah History Museums)

Coal mining led to Issaquah’s transformation from farming community to bustling town.

The industry brought hundreds of workers to Issaquah; the growth continued as businessmen established banks, shops, and other services. Issaquah miners were all ages and came from all across the world, drawn to the area by the promise of employment—at wages higher than that of East Coast miners.

In 1900, just over 60 percent of Issaquah’s workforce was employed in coal mines. About half of these men lived with their families, often in housing rented to them by the mining company. Others were single or separated from their family and lived as boarders in one of Issaquah’s many hotels. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 25, 1989

The First National Bank of Enumclaw is considering selling its Black Diamond branch building to the Black Diamond Community Center Board for a community center.

Dorothy Botts, secretary and treasurer for the 11-member community center board formed in 1979 by the city council, announced the proposition at the Black Diamond City Council’s regular meeting Thursday night.

“We’re really excited,” Botts said. “I talked to some of the seniors and they’re excited too.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 25, 1989

Fire Chief John Bukoskey provided the Black Diamond City Council with a blueprint peek at Fire District 17’s planned support fire station in the Lake Sawyer area at its regular council meeting Thursday.

The 3,700-square-foot support station, which will be built with a $500,000 bond issue voters approved in September, is scheduled for ground breaking in February and completion sometime in the fall.

The 22-man joint volunteer fire department—Black Diamond and King County District 17—covers an 18-square-mile radius and responds to the Black Diamond, Green River Gorge, Flaming Geyser, and Lake Sawyer areas. The planned low-maintenance, brick building will provide facilities for firefighters the current small station in Black Diamond cannot supply, like a classroom, kitchen, hose tower, and living space for a resident firefighter. (more…)

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Originally published in the News Journal, January 23, 1980

Story and photos by Bruce Rommel

Black Diamond sits nestled in the western foothills of the Cascades.

Once hundreds of men worked the strip mines, producing coal, the “black diamond” which powered the railroads, fueled industry, and heated our homes.

Walking the quiet streets of Black Diamond today, one finds only the reminders of those days when this community was a booming company town.

Nestled in the western foothills of the Cascades, Black Diamond and nearby Franklin once boasted a population of more than 5,000. All that remains of Franklin today are a few house foundations scattered along hillsides. And in 1979 Black Diamond is a town with about 1,100 residents, about 50 less citizens than a decade ago. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 16, 1900

King County road supervisors held a well-attended and spirited convention in the library room at the court house yesterday afternoon. A permanent organization to be known as the Road Supervisors’ Association of King County was formed, and numerous speeches dealing with road matters were made. The principal suggestions referred to what is known as the trunk system of roads and broad wagon tires.

Superintendent of Streets Little, of the Seattle city government, called the convention to order, and gave way to temporary chairman W.J. Trimble, of Redmond. After W.E. Conway, A.J. Bossert, and C.H. Daniels, committee on rules and business, and James Clark, George Hummell, and David Gibbon, committee on permanent organization, had reported, the election of officers took place. (more…)

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Originally published in The News Tribune, January 16, 1995

Assessed property value climbing in remote areas

By Kevin Ebi
The News Tribune

Randy Hopper was transferred to his firm’s Tukwila office from San Diego, but he and his family have chosen to live in an Enumclaw subdivision to get away from the problems of city living. (Peter Haley/The News Tribune)

Last year, Randy Hopper received more than a promotion.

He got a new quality of life.

The promotion took his family from the bright lights of San Diego to the rural life of Enumclaw.

Hopper, who didn’t want his job or employer revealed, is part of a trend being seen in Enumclaw and other rural cities in the county. It’s a trend of growth.

Even though the King County real estate boom ended in 1990, areas such as Black Diamond, Carnation, Duvall, Enumclaw, and North Bend continue to grow in value. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, January 13, 1935

Is a fortune in gold—$75,000—buried somewhere about 88-year-old Mrs. Josie Mercier’s Black Diamond home? Deputy Proscutor Carl R. Heussy and County Detective R.J. Allingham yesterday wondered if it is, while they investigated beatings Mrs. Mercier has suffered, and wondered if her refusal to tell the hiding place explained the assaults. (more…)

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