Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘King County’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 11, 1913

Man who preserved order in mountain districts turns in his star to Cudihee

Matt Starwich, for many years deputy sheriff in the mountainous districts of Ravensdale and Black Diamond, whose courageous feats in capturing desperate men have been widely heralded, has turned in his star to Sheriff Ed Cudihee and is once more a private citizen.

He will conduct a saloon at Ravensdale in case the error in the plat of that corporation is corrected and the town stays “wet.”

Every sheriff from Ed Cudihee’s first term down through the administrations of Lou C. Smith and Robert T. Hodge has proclaimed Starwich the best peace officer that King County has ever had in the turbulent mountain towns and hamlets. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 9, 1914

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

That the team entered by the local miners’ union was victorious in the mine rescue and first aid meet held in Black Diamond on Labor Day, defeating the fire bosses’ team organized by the mine operators, is the report to Seattle by William Short, state district secretary of the United Mine Workers, who served as master of ceremonies at Black Diamond’s celebration of the holiday. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published by the Valley Daily News, September 2, 1988

By Bruce Rommel
Staff reporter

Residents of Black Diamond will gather again Sunday and Monday to honor the American worker, and remember the days when coal was king.

There will be flags and a parade, a greased-pole climb, soap box racers, and pie-eating contests.

Area residents are invited to join the festivities and learn something about the century-old community’s coal-mining heydays.

A pancake breakfast and parade are planned for Monday morning, followed by brief Labor Day ceremonies and an afternoon of family oriented games and other events.

The annual Labor Day observance in Black Diamond carries on a tradition begun at the turn of the century in the one-time company town. Labor Day once meant a show of solidarity of union coal miners who clashed with company goons in bitter and sometimes violent strikes during the 1920s. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, August 31, 1988

BLACK DIAMOND — Thousands of people are expected to take a break from work at the annual Black Diamond Labor Day festival this weekend.

An adult dance opens the celebration Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., at the Black Diamond Eagles Hall. A midnight buffet will be served, and “White Water” will provide the music.

Marching bands, antique cars, children’s groups, floats, and horses will participate in Monday’s parade, which begins at 10 a.m. The parade travels on Highway 169 from Third and Lawson streets to the baseball diamond at Black Diamond Elementary School. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 17, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

The Northern Pacific train depot at Lester, Washington, as seen around 1910, now demolished. (Wikipedia)

The Northern Pacific train depot at Lester, Washington, as seen around 1910, now demolished. (Wikipedia)

The Lester depot, built in 1886, has been designated as a county landmark by the King County Landmarks Commission, because of its significant association with early-day railroading which gave the Puget Sound area its first direct line across the Cascade Mountains to the East.

The depot—sold by Burlington Northern Railroad last week to a Woodinville developer for $1—joins a growing list of historically important structures which are protected from alterations that would change their character.

In the future, any contemplated changes affecting the depot must meet the approval of the Landmarks Commission. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 12, 1992

By Heather Larson

More than 75 people turned out at a meeting here on Aug. 4 to show support for the new county being formed, dubbed Cedar County. Residents from Maple Valley, Duvall, and North Bend, all of which will be contained within the borders of Cedar County, turned out for the kickoff meeting last week. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »