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Posts Tagged ‘King County’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 2, 1977

In part through the efforts of Black Diamond City Councilwoman Freddie Shaw and concerned citizen Frank Zumek, Black Diamond will currently have Metro bus service to Seattle and Southcenter every Tuesday.

Freddie and Frank recently appeared on KOMO television to discuss the problems of Metro service for our city. The Tuesday bus will pick up at both the bakery and the café at approximately 9:30 and 4:35 and will depart Seattle at 3:15.

Further information is available at the city hall, 886-2560. (more…)

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Originally published in the King County Journal Reporter, February 1, 2006

Official says toxic gases and high temperatures are dangerous to recreationists

By Morris Malakoff
Journal Reporter

The main opening of one of the coal mines on Cougar Mountain is fenced off. Some of the abandoned mines are burning and collapsing, creating potential dangers for park visitors who hike off of the main trails.

The main opening of one of the coal mines on Cougar Mountain is fenced off. Some of the abandoned mines are burning and collapsing, creating potential dangers for park visitors who hike off of the main trails.

The Industrial Revolution is colliding with the Information Age in the forests south of Bellevue.

Underground coal mines that operated for a century, from the 1860s through the 1950s, are now abandoned—burning and collapsing—and creating potential hazards for park patrons who venture off the established trails in the four-square-mile Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park.

“It’s more than just taking a bad fall,” said Ginger Kaldenbach, senior project manager for U.S. Office of Surface Mining, the agency is responsible for monitoring and sealing abandoned mines. “Many of these mines emit toxic gases and if someone fell into one that is burning, the temperatures are hot and they would be severely burned.”

Of particular concern to Kaldenbach are outdoor recreationists engaged in geocaching—a high-tech treasure hunt using a handheld GPS monitor that tracks a location using a satellite network.

“They are looking at their GPS devices and may not see a collapsed mine and fall into it,” Kaldenbach said. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, January 11, 1999

By Linda Woo

Bob Burdick, 87, helps Sawyer Woods Elementary fifth-grader Sara Martin, 11, with her reading. Each Wednesday, Burdick brings his Scottish terrier with him to greet and help students and staff. He began volunteering seven years ago at Grass Lake Elementary, where his daughter taught kindergarten. (Gary Kissel/Journal)

Bob Burdick, 87, helps Sawyer Woods Elementary fifth-grader Sara Martin, 11, with her reading. Each Wednesday, Burdick brings his Scottish terrier with him to greet and help students and staff. He began volunteering seven years ago at Grass Lake Elementary, where his daughter taught kindergarten. (Gary Kissel/Journal)

BLACK DIAMOND—Bob Burdick’s three children are grown with grandchildren of their own, but many students in South County schools love him like a grandfather.

Every Wednesday, Burdick and Schautze, his black Scottish terrier, faithfully shows up at Sawyer Woods Elementary School to greet and help students and staff members. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

“ATTRACTIVE SIGN BOARD: Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of Pacific Coast Coal Co., is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, ‘A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.’ Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled though the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement.” – Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, “A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.”

Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled through the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, December 16, 1921

Farmers living in the White River Valley were obliged to drive their cattle to the hills for safety.

Renton, Tukwila, and Riverton are under water and people traveling about the towns are obliged to wear hip boots or go on a raft.

Here in Enumclaw many basements were flooded by surface water but little serious damage has been done. Travel between here and Seattle on the highway was stopped by high water near Kent. That city suffered considerable from inundation.

Estimated cost of damage to roads and other losses in King County may run over $400,000.

The flood conditions have been worse than in any season for many years.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, December 7, 1941

Matt Starwich, King County jail superintendent and one of King County’s most colorful police officers, died at 11:22 o’clock last night in Swedish Hospital. He had been in the hospital since early last week, suffering from a complication of ailments.

Starwich, known affectionately for years as the “Little Giant,” had been in failing health since March 7, when he fell five feet on the roof of the County-City Building during Seattle’s test blackout.

The 62-year-old officer’s death ended a vigil that had been kept by his wife, son, and daughter at his bedside for more than 24 hours.

Starwich was the Americanized version of the family name. He was born Mateo Starcevis, son of a shoemaker, at Lich, near Flume (then in Austria), 62 years ago. When he was 12 years old he immigrated with a cousin to LaSalle County, Ill., and at an early age became a coal miner.

Starwich later moved to Marshfield, Or., and from there to Ravensdale in 1901, when there was little law in that mining community and less demand for it. Shootings, stabbings, and free-for-all fights were almost a daily occurrence there. The residents of the town used to brag about “riding” law-enforcement officers out on a rail. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 9, 1988

By McKay Jenkins

Remove the chain from the yellow caboose sitting in front of the Black Diamond Historical Society and you’ll open a door to the city’s history.

Inside, beneath the rotting ceilings and creaking floorboards, is a dilapidated testament to the men who once hauled their livelihoods from the bowels of the earth.

The museum that once housed the town’s train depot now has a train pulled up in front of the station. All that remains is a lot of restoration work for volunteers, said Bob Eaton, the museum’s president.

The caboose was built by Pacific Car and Foundry in Renton in 1921 for the Northern Pacific Railway. Weyerhaeuser then bought it to transport wood, and eventually gave it to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association. (more…)

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