Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘King County’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 15, 1911

Lewis Mascher draws $100 in Justice Court for sending threatening letters to Badachs

BLACK DIAMOND, Saturday, July 15 — Lewis Mascher, an Italian, yesterday was fined $100 and costs by Justice Davis for sending blackmailing letters to the Badach family in this city.

This is the first conviction in Black Diamond for a series of threatening letters that have been mailed to a number of persons here, but evidence brought out at the hearing of Mascher may result in bringing others to justice.

Deputy Sheriff Matt Starwich did the detective work that brought Mascher to justice. Starwich obtained letters written to other persons by Mascher and the signature on these and the blackmailing missives sent to the Badach family is identical.

Starwich is said to be hot on the trail of other blackmailers.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Times, June 16, 1982

By Cathy Reiner
Times South bureau

King County Police Capt. James O’Brien would like to move his Precinct 3 (Southeast King County) police operations to the soon-to-be-vacated Fire District 43 fire station in Maple Valley.

Fire District 43 Chief Dwight Van Zanen would like to sell the fire station.

If the county and fire district commissioners agree, the move could solve some thorny problems for both police and fire operations. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 13, 1989

Maple Valley Day’s Cedar River offers a mecca for summer fun as these youngsters have discovered. — VOICE photo by Teresa Hensley. This young Sonics fan had a prominent spot in the recent Maple Valley Day Parade.

The judges had a difficult task in trying to decide winners among the many excellent entries in the June 2 Maple Valley Day Parade. Their final category decisions are listed below.

DRILL TEAMS, Section 1: 1st, Renaissance “A” Team; 2nd, Drill-A-Rines; 3rd, Ballard Eagles Jr. Drill Team.

DRILL TEAMS, Section 2: 1st, Burien Eagles Drill Team; 2nd, Renaissance “B” Team.

JEEP UNITS: 1st, Green River Valley Jeepers; 2nd, Powerline Pounders. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in Y Ddolen Mai/Mehefin, May/June 2007

By JoAnne Matsumura

The Black Diamond Historical Society has recently photographed the grave markers in the Black Diamond Cemetery, which is now over 125 years old. The oldest grave marker found is dated 1880 of one Rachel Williams. The cemetery is listed on the Washington Heritage Register, The National Register of Historic Places, and the City of Black Diamond Landmarks Register.

This photographic preservation project has captured a moment in time, to be preserved in perpetuity. The wood markers in those early days have long ago given way to the Pacific Northwest’s inclement weather, and those made of the early stone have deteriorated as well. Now, preserved in form that marker can be viewed for that moment in time, for we know that as time marches on so does the evolving deterioration. This project was partially funded by 4Culture, King County Lodging Tax.

The rich Welsh heritage of this once thriving company coal town is well represented by the names on the grave markers. There may be many more of Welsh decent at rest in the cemetery that we may never know, due to the lack of a marker, a name on a marker, or other reason. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Star, May 26,1902

Franklin coal mines

Franklin coal mines

W.G. Hartanft, county superintendent of schools, has made arrangements for the teachers to spend a day at the Franklin and Black Diamond coal mines. These mines are situated just at the entrance of Green River Canyon, among delightfully interesting scenes of the Cascades.

The excursion train will leave from the Ocean dock at the foot of Washington Street, Saturday at 8:30 a.m., and all the teachers and their friends are invited. The fare is $1 a round trip. This is one-half the regular fare. Mr. Hartanft suggests that rubbers and a mackintosh will be necessary in going through the mines.

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 2000

By Barbara Nilson

Photos by Sherrie Acker

The “action” in the 1920s to 1950s, from Seattle south, was at the lake resorts in the Valley. Memories of those glory days were shared at the March program with Dolores Gaffney and Janet Bertagni talking about Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness resort, and Gloria Foss remembering the family’s resort on Shadow Lake.

Lake Wilderness resorts

Attending the historical society program on resorts were, from left, Janet Bertagni, Dolores Gaffney Judge, and Bernadine Gaffney Gebenini.

Dolores Gaffney, daughter of Tom Gaffney, reported her father and his brother Kain purchased the property on Lake Wilderness in 1926 from Abraham and Sam Cohen. The family moved to the lake and the resort opened in the spring of 1927 as Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness.

At that time there were three small family resorts on the lake. Dieckman with his two sons, Jeff and Don, had just started one, and across the lake was McKinney’s. McKinney’s also had a dance hall that was two stories high that they eventually turned into a skating rink. In April 1939 McKinneys sold their place to Gaffneys.

One of the older buildings was used for a dance hall, said Dolores, and they used kerosene lamps. In 1936 they built a new dance hall after the old one burned down. They had a 30-foot-high diving board as well as cabins, tennis courts, picnic areas, ball fields, and playgrounds.

In 1949 Diekmans and Gaffneys were combined and the Gaffneys decided to build a lodge. The design was developed by Young, Richardson and Carlson and won the grand prize from the Washington Chapter of Architects in 1951 and the top award from the American Institute in New York in 1952. The center column totem pole was carved by the famous Doug McCarter. It is 35 feet tall and weighs ten tons. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »