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Posts Tagged ‘King County’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 9, 1988

By McKay Jenkins

Remove the chain from the yellow caboose sitting in front of the Black Diamond Historical Society and you’ll open a door to the city’s history.

Inside, beneath the rotting ceilings and creaking floorboards, is a dilapidated testament to the men who once hauled their livelihoods from the bowels of the earth.

The museum that once housed the town’s train depot now has a train pulled up in front of the station. All that remains is a lot of restoration work for volunteers, said Bob Eaton, the museum’s president.

The caboose was built by Pacific Car and Foundry in Renton in 1921 for the Northern Pacific Railway. Weyerhaeuser then bought it to transport wood, and eventually gave it to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 17, 1968

A monster has reared its ugly head in this community. It is not particular whom it chooses for its victims. Its bite has crippled, maimed, and even killed. It prefers to prey on youth, but no one is immune from its grasp. Its tentacles are comprised of alcohol, glue, and narcotics. They have reached out to kill one Enumclaw youth and reduce another to a living death.

A number of people are trying to find the reasons why it is allowed to flourish here. But one thing is certain to those concerned citizens. It is here and something must be done to rid the community of its cause and effect.

Earl and Isabelle Sherwood, whose 16 year-old son died on July 9 of this year from what a King County coroner’s jury termed “consuming excessive amounts at liquor furnished by person or persons unknown,” want to do what they can to save other parents the grief they have had to bear. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 12, 1895

And so an arrest follows

A nice question for Justice Caldwell to investigate—Thomas’ reason for refusing was not a question of color—Mason’s statement

Barber Al Thomas, who runs the O.K. barber shop on Yesler Avenue, north side, which sits in the right of way of the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad, refused to shave David Mason, a colored miner from Franklin, and the latter has had Thomas arrested. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 8, 1900

Republicans hold one of the most enthusiastic meetings of the present campaign

The Show Hall was built in the early 1890s as a community hall in the business section of Black Diamond. It was later torn down in the late 1960s. (BDHS Calendar series, 1981)

The Show Hall was built in the early 1890s as a community hall in the business section of Black Diamond. It was later torn down in the late 1960s. (BDHS Calendar series, 1981)

Black Diamond, four years ago one of the Populist strongholds in King County, was the scene Saturday night of a most enthusiastic Republican rally. A crowded hall, the largest audience at a political meeting there this campaign, greeted every telling point of the speakers with applause long and hearty.

The enthusiasm and the size of the audience was particularly striking in comparison with the fusion rally there last week. Clark Davis and several other leaders of the Democratic party were present, but the audience secured by them was little more than half the size or that of the Republicans Saturday night. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 23, 1910

Blow of pick pours torrent into Occidental Mine No. 3 at Palmer, ruining coal workings

Heroes volunteer to save unlucky workman

George Brinn doomed, if not already dead, despite efforts to reach victim of rising water

Rising on the slope at the rate of eight inches an hour, water from an underground river which was tapped by the pick of George Brinn, a miner, has completely flooded Occidental Mine No. 3 at Palmer, King County, and now stands at ninety feet on the slope. Brinn is missing and doubtless lost his life when the flood descended on him and in the heroic effort of fellow miners to rescue him dead or alive, two of them, Pit Boss William Barringer and Abner Farmer, a miner, just escaped drowning. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 11, 1913

Man who preserved order in mountain districts turns in his star to Cudihee

Matt Starwich, for many years deputy sheriff in the mountainous districts of Ravensdale and Black Diamond, whose courageous feats in capturing desperate men have been widely heralded, has turned in his star to Sheriff Ed Cudihee and is once more a private citizen.

He will conduct a saloon at Ravensdale in case the error in the plat of that corporation is corrected and the town stays “wet.”

Every sheriff from Ed Cudihee’s first term down through the administrations of Lou C. Smith and Robert T. Hodge has proclaimed Starwich the best peace officer that King County has ever had in the turbulent mountain towns and hamlets. (more…)

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