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Posts Tagged ‘King County’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 27, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

Beer mug from the Morganville Tavern

Beer mug from the Morganville Tavern (photo by Bob Dobson).

At the city council meeting last week, it was announced by Mayor Gomer Evans that the council had made the decision to support Police Chief Jack Berge regarding the issuance of a liquor license to Rick King, owner of Morganville Tavern.

In a tersely worded statement, Evans declined to entertain any further discussion in the matter.

Desiring to more fully understand the process involved in obtaining a license, we called Mr. Doug Alexander, public relations officer for the Liquor Control Board in Olympia. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 25, 1973

Up it goes! The long-awaited reader board and bus shelter is on its way! Lions’ Club workers hope to have it completed soon.

Up it goes! The long-awaited reader board and bus shelter is on its way! Lions’ Club workers hope to have it completed soon.

The Maple Valley Lions Club has received authorization from Burlington Northern Railroad, the State of Washington, and King County to proceed with the construction of a new lighted reader board and bus stop in downtown Maple Valley.

The reader board will scale 16 feet in height and will be about 14 feet wide. It will be located at the Lions’ Park across from the Maple Valley Serve-U store. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 23, 1924

Pacific Coast Co. Hotel

The 67-room Black Diamond Hotel was across the street from the depot/museum, where the Eagles are today.

Crazed temporarily by moonshine, deputy sheriffs charge, Richard Gunner, 38 years old, a miner, armed with a revolver, went on a rampage in the Black Diamond Hotel in Black Diamond, shooting another miner and ending up in the King County jail.

Gunner appeared at the hotel during the evening, the officers were informed, and threatened to slay anyone who would attempt to keep him from obtaining revenge against a real or fancied rival. He left but returned, shouting that he intended to “get someone,” and began firing. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 20, 1902

He may be in the woods near Sawyer Lake or he may be miles away—No one knows

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

Tracy has apparently dropped as completely out of sight as though the earth had opened and swallowed him. Since his disappearance from the cabin on the shores of Lake Sawyer last Wednesday afternoon, or night, no trace of him has been had.

His long silence and failure to appear at some house for food and clothing lends weight to the opinion of Sheriff Cudihee that Tracy is still in hiding in the vicinity of the lake. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 18, 1902

Everything moved out and no scent for the hounds

Detailed story of the chase of the past few days

By Larris Cain

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

The elusive Tracy has again given Sheriff Cudihee and his posse of picked men the slip, and has succeeded in escaping from one of the most cleverly laid plans to effect his capture that has been resorted to since his escape from the Oregon penitentiary.

Since last Saturday Tracy has occupied a deserted cabin on the east shore of Lake Sawyer, which is situated about midway between Covington, a small station on the Palmer cut-off, and Black Diamond. No more ideal hiding place could have been selected, for it is located in the heart of a wilderness which it is almost impossible to penetrate.

No more strategic location could have been desired, as it stood on a high part of the bank of the lake, which gave its occupant a sweeping view of that body of water; and any one approaching the cabin from that side could have been seen for at least a mile up and down its shores. To the rear is a wild forest with here and there a small path almost invisible on account of the recent growth of small brush. (more…)

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