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Posts Tagged ‘coal mining’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 15, 1906

Milwaukee practically forced to take Snoqualmie Pass and preparatory measures are all along that line

Three-mile tunnel from point near head of Lake Keechelus would insure a maximum grade of about 1 percent

Extensive coal fields reaching from Renton to Roslyn with gap at the summit, strong point in favor

Northern Pacific engineers laying out and building the Yakima & Valley Railroad have practically blocked the Milwaukee out of Naches Pass and forced the selection of the Snoqualmie gateway to the Sound. Coast officials of the new transcontinental line are making all their preparations for the use of Snoqualmie Pass and only a showing of impossibility in grades or some new advantage in Naches Pass will change the present plan.

As Milwaukee officials have now marked out the route for that line across this state, the road will connect either inside or just outside the city limits with the Columbia & Puget Sound following that road up through the Cedar River Valley and across to Rattlesnake Prairie up to that point the company will gain a maximum grade of 8/10 of one percent. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 29, 1923

These men are not singing the old nursery rhyme of “Rub-a-dub-dub, three men in a tub,” even though the picture does call to mind the childhood jingle. They are eight full-sized he-men with safety lamps, full lunch buckets, and skilled hands, aboard a man trip ready to start down the slope to the lower levels of Black Diamond Mine for an eight-hour shift.

Among those in the car recognized by the Bulletin photographer were: Frank Eddy, George Hoadley, Joe Marquis, Serge Head, and Robt. Ogden. (more…)

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This is a story told by Henry Walters of some of the events of his life.

He was born in England and his Father, Richard Walters, was a railroad contractor. They lived in various parts of England, moving as often as the railroad construction jobs required.

At the age of 11 he went to work as a blacksmith’s helper. He worked for three years and saved enough money to emigrate to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada in 1882. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

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By Morda C. Slauson, 1958

Thanksgiving of 1862 was celebrated royally in a log cabin on the Duwamish River. Jacob Maple, his sons and daughters and two young men, Henry Van Asselt and Luther W. Collins, sat at a rough board table and gave thanks for the safe completion of a long, dangerous journey and the reuniting of a family.

Jacob and his son, Samuel, who had first arrived on Puget Sound in 1851, had just returned from a trip to the middle west, bringing the rest of the family to become the first permanent settlers of the Duwamish valley.

Faded land deeds, relating to the Maple property, now owned by Boeing Airplane Company, are among the souvenirs of Seattle’s early years which are cherished by Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh, 16020 196th Ave., Maple Valley. Her late husband, Fred Cavanaugh, was born in 1871 in the family home on the present site of Boeing Field, son of Mary Ann Maple and Martin L. Cavanaugh. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 21, 2001

By Barbara Nilson

The former home of Luigi and Aurora Pagani at the foot of Merino Street in Black Diamond is being considered as a Historical Landmark by the King County Landmarks and Heritage commission; hearing is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 29 at 7 p.m., at the Black Diamond Community Center. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

The former home of Luigi and Aurora Pagani at the foot of Merino Street in Black Diamond is being considered as a Historical Landmark by the King County Landmarks and Heritage commission; hearing is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 29 at 7 p.m., at the Black Diamond Community Center. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

An important hearing to support the establishment of two historical landmarks in the area, the former TaHoMa High School on S.E. 216th Street and the Pagani miner’s home in Black Diamond on Merino Street, will be held on Thursday, Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. at the Black Diamond Community Center, 31605 – 3rd Ave., by the King County Landmarks and Heritage Commission. (more…)

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