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Posts Tagged ‘coal mining’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 18, 1923

When those who had gathered at Burnett last Thursday, to attend the monthly meeting of the Store Department, checked up after all were seated around the dinner table it was discovered that all records had been broken in the number attending, a count showing 52 present. After an excellent dinner, prepared and served by Chef Emil Bernhard and his assistants, an instructive and enjoyable program of talks was attentively listened to.

J.C. Hinckley of the West Coast Grocery Co., Tacoma, led off with a very able talk of an inspirational nature. He was followed by L.W. Foreman, the new manager of Burnett store, who briefly outlined his program for the development of trade. R.A. Krebs, manager of Newcastle store, then read a paper dealing with salesmanship, which was followed by a talk on “Some Knotty Problems” by H.M. McDowell, manager of Black Diamond store. McDowell’s talk provoked an extended discussion of various problems met with daily in the company stores. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 18, 1895

The slope is stopped up

Franklin mines continue to be the scene of excitement—every effort was made to rescue the four unfortunate men without avail

The bodies of the four men known to have perished in the slope fire yesterday at the Franklin coal mines have not been recovered and the fire has not yet been extinguished, although the flames have been got under control and the slope closed up with timbers, sand, and dirt.

Of the men dead, full mention of whom was made in the 5 o’clock edition of last evening’s Times, John Glover was a white man and George W. Smalley, John Adams, and James Stafford were colored men, Smalley leaving a wife and child and Adams and Stafford being single men. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1904

The Pacific Coast Company has inaugurated an eight-hour day and raised wages of all laborers in its mines.

The changes are made effective October 1.

The increase is voluntary on the part of the company and was made without application by the men. In fact, the first intimation the men had of the changed conditions was given when notices were posted under the direction of Chief Engineer James Anderson announcing the higher scale was effective. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 1, 1890

In this same great county are 100,000 acres of coal lands. Their active development began twenty years ago, 4,918 tons of coal being shipped to San Francisco in 1871. From year to year the output has increased, until now in amounts to 600,000 tons, and until it has amounted in all to 3,830,000 tons since the beginning, against 2,835,000 tons from all other parts of the state combined.

The principal mines are those of Newcastle, Cedar Mountain, Black Diamond, Franklin, Gilman, and Durham, new mines being those at Black River, Kangley, and Niblock. (more…)

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Originally published in the The Seattle Star, September 16, 1907

Digging coal 500 feet underground in the mines of the Superior Coal and Improvement Co.

Digging coal 500 feet underground in the mines of the Superior Coal and Improvement Co.

The Superior Coal and Improvement Company, now owning and operating a producing coal mine 12 miles east of Seattle, offers a block of stock at 40¢ per share cash, or 45¢ on installments, to raise enough money to lay 3 miles of railroad track over a right of way 100 feet wide owned by the company, and graded for over two miles, with 7,000 cedar ties cut and stacked along the grade.

Read carefully the following report on our property by one of the leading mining engineers of the great Northwest, Mr. F.H. Whitworth, who has had 25 years’ experience in mining in the state of Washington. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in a Palmer Coking Coal Co. memorandum, 1964

palmer-coking-coal-coFor the last thirty-odd years, Palmer Coking Coal Co., Inc. has been in continuous operation as a vital part of the economy of the area in and around Black Diamond. Its people have had steady and secure employment at good wages these many years.

In a basic industry, such as mining, the direct benefits to the economy of an area are greatly reinforced by indirect and related jobs that are necessary to support a mining operation. (more…)

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