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Posts Tagged ‘coal mining’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, May 18, 1880

One of the most convincing proofs of the steady growth and prosperity of our territory is to be found in the development and increased capacity of our coal mines. And, for an example we will take one, near at hand—the Newcastle mine—situated near Lake Washington, in the central portion of our county to demonstrate this proposition. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 14, 1918

Throughout the nation the call is resounding, “Lay in your next winter’s coal NOW.”

That is the urgent appeal of the United States Fuel Administration, and it applies with as much force in the State of Washington as in any other state in the Union, so officials of the administration point out it is a patriotic duty as well as a measure of preparedness to see that the fuel bin is filled up quickly, for the nation is facing such problems as never confronted her before in the mining and distribution of coal.

Industries, especially those engaged in war work, have first call on the coal production, and they are going at fever heat, with an acceleration that means a continual increase in coal consumption.

To move crops and war materials next fall and winter will require the entire car capacity of all the railroads. This means that the cars must get in their work now in hauling the coal you will need next winter. Nor does a car shortage condition impend only in the Eastern states. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 8, 1924

Not a feminine foot faltered when the guides for this group of King County P.T.A. members led the way into the dark recesses of the Primrose Tunnel at Newcastle. These women, a portion of 300 who recently visited Newcastle Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, here saw firsthand the actual processes of coal mining.

The guides for this group were, Dan Carey, Jas. E. Ash, and Phillip Chase, all of the Engineering Department. John Eck, fireboss in charge of the operations at Primrose, is kneeling at the left. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 28, 1976

Coal is moving once again through the streets of Black Diamond, Friday, April 15. Four trucks from Moulden & Sons of Enumclaw, began bringing coal into the Palmer Coking Coal Company’s washing plant at the north end of town.

Each truck has a capacity of 12 tons and each truck makes up to 14 round trips a day so by our calculations that amounts to 672 tons per day! According to Wendell, one of the drivers, they will be hauling five days a week, at least until September. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 10, 1924

Not all gangs which go underground at Black Diamond are bent upon breaking all known hoist records. Evidence of this is seen in the group above which one Sunday recently explored the depths of the mine, guided by Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse.

The party was arranged by Frank Bergman, mine storekeeper, who was also the photographer, which explains his absence from the group. Those in the picture are: J.E. Clarkin, Joe Malo, Mrs. J.E. Clarkin, Miss Margaret Malo, Al A. Bergman, Theo. Rouse, Miss Gilbert Malo, N S. Bergman, and Miss Theresa Malo. (more…)

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