Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘coal mining’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 9, 1925

Probably the youngest First Aid Team in the world, the Black Diamond Midgets, ranging in age from 7 to 9 years, were a feature attraction at the Independence Day celebration in Black Diamond. The boys are training for an exhibition drill at the State Meet to be held July 25. Johnny Gallagher is captain of the team, the other members including Roy Hale, Jimmy Nicholson, Oliver Rouse, Harold Lloyd, Bennie Hughes, and Elmon Rouse. Harold Lloyd, Sr., is the instructor. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 2, 1925

Eyes steady in the face of danger
Resourceful, true, a man of soldier-worth
Who braves, for loved ones’ peace and comfort
The dark, deep-delving trenches of the earth. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2007

Story and photos by Barbara Nilson

Paul Bartholomew and his daughter, Karen Lindquist, stand in front of the foundation for the press factory that made clay pipe.

The daffodils are blooming in Taylor as they do every spring to welcome back those who have fond memories of living there when it was a booming coal and clay company town. Taylor existed from 1892-1947, when the Seattle Public Utilities formed the Cedar River Watershed and closed the area to the public.

Each April the Utility District and Friends of the Cedar River Watershed offer the walking tour into Taylor for two weekends at a cost of $15. Participants gather at the Cedar River Watershed Visitors/Education Center for a slideshow of early day Taylor, then climb into vans for the 10-mile drive to the site.

The Education Center has interpretive exhibits that show where our water comes from and historical materials about the watershed area. It is an interesting place to browse anytime of the year. I especially like the musical artwork in the rain drum court where drops of water play tunes on the various drums. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Daily Post-Intelligencer, June 26, 1884

The idea of subsidizing the Columbia & Puget Sound Company to enable it to complete its road up Cedar River was a good one, but not so good as another that has since been put forth. The new idea is to loan the company the needed money, and it was proposed by Mr. Howard, the company’s representative. The terms upon which the money is to be loaned will strike the reader as most fair, and will be found reported in full in the following. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 25, 1925

Practically the entire populations of Newcastle, Burnett, Carbonado, Black Diamond, and Wilkeson joined in celebrating the first annual picnic given by the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and allied companies at Fortuna Park last Sunday.

Music was plentifully dispensed throughout the day by the combined Newcastle and Black Diamond bands, numbering 40 pieces in all. Wilkeson, as special guests from the Wilkeson Coal Coke Co., came in more than 50 automobiles, each decorated with a distinctive sign. The ambulance was utilized as a supply wagon. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 19, 1910

R.P. Price, on Sunday exploring expedition, discovers new route to Renton, with good roads all the way

Passes one machine between two cities: Trip circles Lake Washington, by way of Newcastle and Coal Creek, where automobiles are novelty

A new scenic drive, a few miles from the heart of the city, has been discovered by R.P. Price. He says that for a short run it is the best he has yet seen. Few motorists seem to be aware of its existence. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »