Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘coal mining’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 12, 1925

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

One hundred sixteen years ago the Great Emancipator was born amid humbler surroundings than is the birthright of most Americans today. Yet his memory is hallowed year by year by millions, and the example of his noble ideals is set before every schoolchild; an inspiration to the attainment of the loftiest pinnacle of success, no matter how lowly the start. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 5, 1925

Every concern is on the lookout for good men and that is why you seldom hear a good man complaining about not getting enough salary. When the firm he is with fails to pay him all his services are worth someone else is going to come along and do it. — Coleman Cox. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the King County Journal Reporter, February 1, 2006

Official says toxic gases and high temperatures are dangerous to recreationists

By Morris Malakoff
Journal Reporter

The main opening of one of the coal mines on Cougar Mountain is fenced off. Some of the abandoned mines are burning and collapsing, creating potential dangers for park visitors who hike off of the main trails.

The main opening of one of the coal mines on Cougar Mountain is fenced off. Some of the abandoned mines are burning and collapsing, creating potential dangers for park visitors who hike off of the main trails.

The Industrial Revolution is colliding with the Information Age in the forests south of Bellevue.

Underground coal mines that operated for a century, from the 1860s through the 1950s, are now abandoned—burning and collapsing—and creating potential hazards for park patrons who venture off the established trails in the four-square-mile Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park.

“It’s more than just taking a bad fall,” said Ginger Kaldenbach, senior project manager for U.S. Office of Surface Mining, the agency is responsible for monitoring and sealing abandoned mines. “Many of these mines emit toxic gases and if someone fell into one that is burning, the temperatures are hot and they would be severely burned.”

Of particular concern to Kaldenbach are outdoor recreationists engaged in geocaching—a high-tech treasure hunt using a handheld GPS monitor that tracks a location using a satellite network.

“They are looking at their GPS devices and may not see a collapsed mine and fall into it,” Kaldenbach said. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 29, 1925

Few coal camps in the country can boast of a wash house comparable with the splendid structure erected for that purpose in Carbonado. Of brick and hollow tile construction, with full cement floors, the building is modern throughout and equipped with every device for the comfort and convenience of the men.

Adding to its attractiveness is a neat lawn with ornamental flower beds in front of the building. A portion of the wing to the left is devoted to canteen purposes, providing pool tables and a stock of confectionery and tobacco for the men of the camp. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 18, 2014

By Bill Kombol

The United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) were first organized on January 25, 1890. At one time this union was the most powerful in America.

From 1920 through 1960 the UMWA coal miners were led by John L. Lewis, a persuasive labor leader who founded, the Congress of Industrial Organizations, better known as the second half of the acronym AFL-CIO. Coal mine union membership peaked in 1946 at 500,000 but has since dipped to under to under 75,000, only 20,000 of whom are active coal miners. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 22, 1925

One of the greatest assets which any community can possess is a fine school. In this particular Newcastle ranks with the best and every citizen of the camp is proud of the fact. There is the very finest co-operation between the teaching staff and the Parent-Teacher Association which serves to keep both pupils and parents interested in the school’s welfare and advancement.

The view shown herewith was taken some time ago, when the youngsters were enjoying the sunshine of the noon hour. Prof. M.M. Richardson is the principal of the school, teaching the 7th and 8th grades. Mrs. Richardson teaches the 5th and 6th grades, Miss the 3rd and 4th, and Mrs. R.R. Sterling the primary grades. There are approximately 110 pupils enrolled. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 30, 1925

Old Black Diamond Mine No. 11, deepest colliery in the United States, is scene of fatal ‘bump’

Two men lost their lives and three others were imprisoned for eight hours before being released by a rescue crew following a cave-in that occurred in the old Black Diamond Mine No. 11 at Black Diamond yesterday afternoon.

The dead are W.R. Brunner, 36, years old, and Emilo Piquet, 35, both of Black Diamond.

Eight men were working in the vicinity of the cave-in. In addition to the two who lost their lives, three were imprisoned by the slide and three escaped without assistance. The six who were rescued or escaped were H.R. Algee, Walter Faulkner, Ben Davis, Walter Remus, E.M. Anthony, and George Belt. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »