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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

Miss Kimberly Capponi, affectionately known as “Kim,” will be installed as Worthy Advisor, Laurel Assembly of the International Order of Rainbow Girls on Saturday, May 20, at the Masonic Temple in Black Diamond. She will serve for a four-month term. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 8, 1924

Not a feminine foot faltered when the guides for this group of King County P.T.A. members led the way into the dark recesses of the Primrose Tunnel at Newcastle. These women, a portion of 300 who recently visited Newcastle Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, here saw firsthand the actual processes of coal mining.

The guides for this group were, Dan Carey, Jas. E. Ash, and Phillip Chase, all of the Engineering Department. John Eck, fireboss in charge of the operations at Primrose, is kneeling at the left. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 24, 1924

Recently officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and representatives of Yakima Valley fruit growers conducted tests to determine the effectiveness of preventing damage to blossoming trees by the installation of Diamond Briquet burners in the orchards. The result was most satisfactory.

At the right in the above cut is shown an orchard scene with a briquet burner in the foreground. To the lower left is a truck load of Diamond Briquets being delivered in the orchard. The man in the driver’s seat is T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department. In the oval, from left to right, is N.D. Moore, vice-president Pacific Coast Coal Co.; Arthur Karr, Yakima Valley orchardist and inventor of the briquet burner; A.F. Marion, chief engineer Pacific Coast Coal Co.; T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department, and Bruce Dower of the John Dower Lumber Co., Yakima dealer for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Railroads played a key role in the development of most King County towns, including Ravensdale. The arrival of the nation’s second transcontinental railway, the Northern Pacific (NP) in 1883 dramatically accelerated growth throughout the Washington Territory.

The development of a production-scale coal mine required a rail link to deliver the massive equipment needed to operate the mine and to transport the coal to market.

The extension of the Columbia and Puget Sound (C&PS) railway in 1884 from Renton by Henry Villard’s Oregon Improvement Company enabled the coal mines at Cedar Mountain (1884), Black Diamond (late 1884), Franklin (1885), and Danville (1896) to begin production. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 5, 1989

Groundbreakers were Ann Trullinger, project manager; Rosemary Konoske, branch manager; Rich Martindale, bank president; Philip E. Biege, chairman of the board; Rudy Petchnick, preliminary site work; Rick Driftmier, architect; and bulldozer operator Rick Fardig. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Groundbreakers were Ann Trullinger, project manager; Rosemary Konoske, branch manager; Rich Martindale, bank president; Philip E. Biege, chairman of the board; Rudy Petchnick, preliminary site work; Rick Driftmier, architect; and bulldozer operator Rick Fardig. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Ground was broken last week on the 1.3 acre site of the First National Bank of Enumclaw’s new branch at Four Corners. The site is on the south side of Kent-Kangley Road near the road’s intersection with Highway 169, across the highway from the bank’s existing branch. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 3, 1924

Because of the steep pitch of the main slopes in some of the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company it is necessary to use covers on the cars in which the coal is hoisted to prevent it being scattered along the slope on the way to the tipple.

In the picture above is shown a new type of cover invented and patented by W.B. Walker of Newcastle. This cover is so designed that it telescopes along the side of the car when not in use. The picture shows the cover folded back and also covering the loaded coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier Herald, March 31, 1988

Frank Zumek and Brad Darby display a smokehouse full of ready-to-eat Easter hams.

Frank Zumek and Brad Darby display a smokehouse full of ready-to-eat Easter hams.

Easter is traditionally ham time. Grocers and local meat markets are preparing for the increase in sales, while shoppers are weighing the price differences and deciding which type of ham they’ll bake.

Ham, a form of pork, comes with and without a bone. Customers make their choice based on convenience, cost and taste, local meat merchants say. (more…)

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