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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 5, 1989

Chuck and Pattie Holtz have lived in Black Diamond most of their lives. They own a half-acre of land on Fifth Avenue and live in an older, remodeled home that used to be the Catholic church’s rectory.

Lately Pattie’s considered moving. She said the neighborhood isn’t what it used to be.

“I feel like I’m living in a mobile home park,” she said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, June 28, 1989

By Kathleen Wilson

BLACK DIAMOND — Officials here seem to be one step closer to realizing a workable solution to the city’s sewer woes now that the Federal Environmental Protection Agency is studying a proposed direct pipeline to Metro.

The plan to run a connecting sewer pipeline from Black Diamond to Metro’s Renton sewage treatment plant was recently accepted by the state Department of Ecology, according to Bill Lee, wastewater consultant for the city. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 14, 1989

Zach Sullivan and Jennifer Drury earn the Pettersen Award. Photo by Brenda Berube.

Black Diamond Elementary School started off the succession of sixth-grade graduations June 6 with a formal ceremony that included awards and diplomas.

Black Diamond sixth-grade teacher Rich Hubber said the sixth-grade graduation is a spin-off from the old eight-grade graduation, back when graduating from the eighth-grade was as far as most students got.

“It’s part of the tradition of the school,” Hubber said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 14, 1989

Black Diamond’s Community Center Board voted unanimously Thursday to accept the First National Bank of Enumclaw’s offer of $285,000 for its abandoned bank building in Black Diamond. The center board plans to remodel the building for use as a senior and youth center.

The bank is selling the building for $40,000 less than the appraisal and will not rent space for a banking facility within the structure. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 11, 1916

Lake trip ideal for motorists

Magnificent scenery found on tour to White Sulphur Spring—road passes along Cedar River Gorge

Abundant sport waits fishermen’s coming

Beauty spots on scenic drive. Two river canyons, each leading back into the Cascades, are followed on the tour presented by The Times today, terminating at Lake Wilderness, twenty-nine miles distant from the city. The colored illustration shows The Times pathfinder car, the Hupmobile, as it arrived at the lake shore. Below, in the accompanying photograph, is a view of the Green River canyon, shortly after the car had crossed the hill from Black Diamond.

Less than thirty miles from Seattle, at the end of a pathway which leads through ever-changing scenery, along the magnificent Cedar River gorge and up into the mining section of King County, lies Lake Wilderness, towards which The Times pathfinder car, a Hupmobile, blazed the trail for the second of the 1916 series of tours and the twenty-sixth in the grand total thus far logged by this newspaper.

The car, kindly furnished by Mr. Louis P. Schaeffer of the William T. Patten Motor Company, and driven by D.P. Dean, left The Times Building at Second Avenue and Union Street shortly after 9 o’clock and was at Lake Wilderness in ample time to permit an hour’s fishing in the lake before noon as an appetizer.

During the afternoon, the return was made by way of Black Diamond and Auburn, a slightly longer route but well worth the extra effort. In addition to providing variety to the trip, the alternate highway descended into a country of splendid roads and fascinating scenery, joining the Pacific Highway thence into Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the News Tribune, June 6, 1997

By Bart Ripp

This restaurant verifies its first name.

It is famous.

Famous Black Diamond Bakery & Restaurant has been famous in the cozy South King County mining town as a bakery since 1902 and as an eating destination since 1983, when Doug Weiding bought the place.

I cannot think of a Western Washington town so synonymous with a place to eat. Say Black Diamond, and you think of dynamite bread. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Reporter, June 3, 2011

Gomer Evans’ Welsh family heritage and the story of a father’s years in the mines

By TJ Martinell

Gomer Evans Sr. left, holding a lunch pail, stands with his arm on the cart outside a mine in the Black Diamond area. The photo is undated. Photo courtesy Sherrie Evans

Walking through the Black Diamond Historical Museum is like strolling through the family room for Gomer Evans, Jr.

A framed picture of his parents’ wedding sits on top of a glass display of family Bibles.

A photograph of his older brother, Dave, hangs on the wall in the main room.

As he flips through a collection of historical pictures, he finds his father, Gomer Evans Sr., sitting among a row of Welsh engineers. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1922

Green River mill at Baldi completely destroyed

Pacific States Company loses three outfits, thousands in railway equipment

Forest fire damage to the Pacific States Lumber Company, both at Selleck and Cedar Falls, was increased overnight with the loss last night of Camp No. 18 at Cedar Falls. This makes three logging camps lost by the company, including all the bridges on eleven miles of railway, a coal bunker, twelve donkey engines, fifteen freight cars, a section camp, an enormous amount of fallen timber, and several cars of logs. Two small residences at Selleck also burned last night. Today there was virtually no wind around the company’s territory and it was reported the fire situation was getting under control. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 27, 1926

Miss Velma Hull demonstrates the Simpson Signaling Life Line, invented by Homer Blair and used for the first time at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Burnett last Saturday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 20, 1926

One of Black Diamond’s finest assets is its splendid high school with the fine student body pictured in the group shown above. In athletics, dramatics, and all school activities, there is a wonderful school spirit which largely accounts for the creditable showing made by Black Diamond High.

In addition, the high school is interested in First Aid training and has two teams which will compete in the annual Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet at Burnett next Saturday. Prof. Albert Weatherbee is the principal of the school. (more…)

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