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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 28, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

In September 1925 the Seattle Post-Intelligencer published an article about Flaming Geyser Park and its unique gas-bubbling spring. At that time it was a privately-owned facility providing campsites, stoves, restrooms, a swimming pool fed by the Green River, fish hatchery, and round picnic tables cut from six-foot sections of fir trees. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 28, 1977

Louis Duett and Larry Hill, new operators of the Shell station and the Black Diamond Garage, stand with Larry’s son Jim beside their gas pumps at 3rd and Lawson.

Louis Duett and Larry Hill, new operators of the Shell station and the Black Diamond Garage, stand with Larry’s son Jim beside their gas pumps at 3rd and Lawson.

A very warm welcome to Black Diamond is extended to Louis Duett and Larry Hill. They are now operating the Shell station and the Black Diamond Garage located at the blinking light, 3rd & Lawson. Louis is a front end expert and Larry the transmission specialist. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, September 14, 1989

They will be serving punch and cookies and shooting basketballs Saturday at the Gracie Hansen Community Center, a far cry from the days of whiskey sours and topless dancers.

After more than a decade of dormancy, the building that Gracie graced is ready to strut its stuff as a community center. During the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair, it was the home of the Paradise International Club, famous for its topless dancers.

King County has scheduled a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house from noon to 5 p.m. at the steel and concrete building just off the Kent-Kangley Road at 272nd Avenue Southeast in Ravensdale. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, May 1999

By Margie Markus

Some things we remember about Selleck. I gathered some of my information from articles I have on Selleck. Some came from my memories and my mother’s memories (Eva Litras).

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

Growing up as a little girl I lived at Elkcoal (mining town). It was about five miles from the town of Selleck.

I have many fond memories of growing up in that area and going to school at Selleck grade school which had first to the eighth grade, and then to Enumclaw to high school.

The original schoolhouse suffered a devastating fire in 1929. It was rebuilt in 1930 on the same site and is currently being used as an office and shop. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 25, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

Honor H. Wilhelm as he appeared in his later years.

Honor H. Wilhelm as he appeared in his later years.

Two daughters of the late Rev. Honor L. Wilhelm‚ have been going through the trunks, papers, library, and attic in a 70-year-old house at 2258 W. 61st St. trying to place in some sort of order the literary legacy of a one-time Seattle publisher.

Mr. Wilhelm, who died May 21, edited The Coast magazine from 1902 to 1910.

Mrs. Wilhelm, unable to move around much because of a hip injury, was aided by her daughters, Helen (Mrs. Arvid Sagor) of 2148 N. 63rd St. and Margaret (Mrs. Ronald L. Cripe) of Enumclaw in closing the house, which was to be sold.

In the 40 years the Wilhelms lived in it the dwelling gradually filled with the owner’s literary output. Mr. Wilhelm wrote poems for every occasion. He wrote autobiographies from his boyhood. He edited several publications. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 13, 1908

Top row, from left to right—Rees Morgan, ss and c; George Rockefeller, lf and manager; George Ayers, 1b; A.C. Davies, secretary and treasurer; Dan Meredith, 3b and rf; Walter Newton, 3b and ss; Lew McDonald, 2b. Bottom row—Earle Davis, rf; Thomas Oughton, cf; Archie Hutcheson, umpire; Joe Ainardi, president; Dave Boyd, official score keeper; Pierpont Morgans, c; Bert Hoye, p and captain; Alvin Davis, mascot.

Top row, from left to right—Rees Morgan, ss and c; George Rockefeller, lf and manager; George Ayers, 1b; A.C. Davies, secretary and treasurer; Dan Meredith, 3b and rf; Walter Newton, 3b and ss; Lew McDonald, 2b. Bottom row—Earle Davis, rf; Thomas Oughton, cf; Archie Hutcheson, umpire; Joe Ainardi, president; Dave Boyd, official score keeper; Pierpont Morgans, c; Bert Hoye, p and captain; Alvin Davis, mascot.

The above is a picture of the undefeated Black Diamond baseball team, winners of fourteen straight games. They have defeated teams from Enumclaw, Auburn, Newcastle, and some of the fastest amateur teams of Seattle. (more…)

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