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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 18, 1979

By Teresa Hensley

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

“There is no imminent danger, and people should not be alarmed,” said Colonel John A. Poteat, the Army Corps Seattle District Engineer, in a press release last week from Seattle City Light about the masonry dam above the Cedar River.

In an earlier press conference it was revealed that the dam could prove unsafe in the event of a major flood.

Conditions which could trigger such an emergency—described as “a flood on top of a flood” by Joe Recchi, acting superintendent of City Light—have never been approached in the 75 years of the project. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 17, 1924

Bidding against the competition of eastern firms, the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, recently won the contract for the building of the Test Weight Car shown in the above engraving.

The car weighs 80,000 pounds and is used jointly by the states of Washington and Oregon for the testing of railroad scales. The body of the car is composed of two castings running lengthwise, each of which weighs 17 ½ tons. The name plate just over the wheel in the center of the picture reads, “Built by Pacific Coast Eng’r. Co., Seattle, Wash.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 16, 1912

Fire damp in Burnett workings explodes—Slavish worker buried under coal

TACOMA, Tuesday, April 16.—One miner was killed and seven were painfully but not seriously burned as the result of an explosion of fire damp in the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Burnett, a small coal mining town twenty-five miles southeast of Tacoma, at 3 o’clock yesterday afternoon.

The explosion was caused either by the breaking of a miner’s safety lamp or by the careless usage of one of the lamps.

Joe Majcat, a Slavonian, age 30, was buried by coal when the explosion occurred and smothered him to death. He was working on the third level of the mine with seven other Slavonian miners when the flare took place, and was hurled backwards into a coal chute.

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 15, 1992

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

It’s not pretty, but it’s functional.

At least that’s what Bill Lee, Black Diamond’s waste water project construction manager and city consultant, says of the city’s flushing tank recently erected at the Black Diamond Cemetery.

When operational, the concrete box will provide 20,000 gallons of water to flush a siphon in the waste water system along Roberts Drive.

According to Lee, there’s a drop in the pipe at Roberts Drive, and waste water has to go up a 24-foot hill before it flows out of the city. The flushing tank will send a rush of water through the system, pushing stray solids through the system.

The building is a tall, square concrete box at the entrance of the cemetery.

“Of all the options we looked at,” Lee said, “this was the least obnoxious.” (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, April 1977

By Harry Rossi & Norma Gumser

Pacific Coast Co. Hotel

The 67-room Pacific Coast Co. Hotel was across the street from the depot/museum, where the Eagles are today.

Harry Rossi was ten years old or thereabouts [ca. 1930], and it was his chore after school to pick up the trimmings from the Pacific Coast Hotel. It made good food for the hogs.

He crossed the street at the depot with his load, down the wooden sidewalk going home. At the tavern, there were these three young men loafing out in front. One of them tripped Harry and his can of slop spilled all over the sidewalk. The young men roared with laughter and Harry scrambled to pick up the pieces.

He hurried home, down the broad sidewalk, past the garage, past the dry goods store, the meat market, and the bakery, and down the hill to home. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 11, 1979

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

It was “Wall Raising Day” at Four Corners on April 2 for the Coast-to-Coast Hardware store which will move from Wilderness Village to its new site this coming June.

Huge tilt-up panels of reinforced concrete were lifted into place by the crane operator and secured by a half dozen other skilled workmen within 6 ½ hours. (more…)

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