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Posts Tagged ‘Cumberland’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1988

By Joe Haberstroh and Margaret Bakken

The Enumclaw Plateau’s proposed community plan calls for slow growth, but some of the plan’s authors fear the proposed restrictions may freeze out people who had planned to build homes on small lots.

No one is sure how much land would be rezoned under the plan that Enumclaw Plateau residents in southeastern King County are receiving in the mail this week from King County. But sizable parcels once set aside for one-acre lots are proposed for a zone with lots 2 1/2 acres and larger. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, July 29, 1987

Horseshoe pitching is more than just a picnic folly for the Heines

Elwood and Ken are teammates on the Green River Tavern team.

Elwood and Ken are teammates on the Green River Tavern team.

Meet Elwood and Kenneth Heine, the “shoes brothers.”

The Heines pitch horseshoes with passion and precision. They’ve flung the weighty good-luck pieces with South King County’s best for more than a decade. In the horseshoe pits, the Heines make their own luck.

For Elwood and Ken, horseshoe pitching is more than a picnic folly. It’s an art, a rhythmic exercise with a rustic beat—the thud of the shoe in the sand, its clink against the metal stake. Nearly every other horseshoe they loft snuggles perfectly around its target.

Close does count in horseshoes—a point is awarded if the shoe is within six inches of the stake—but for the Heines, only a “ringer” will do. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 12, 1934

Payroll statement is clue that leads to recovery of loot and arrest of 3 Wednesday

Jack’s Place, ca. 1940, was located near the Green River Gorge Resort on the east side of the river.

Jack’s Place, ca. 1940, was located near the Green River Gorge Resort on the east side of the river.

A Pacific Coast Coal Company payroll statement, picked up near the service station operated by George Tethaway, at Green River Gorge proved the “clue” that led to the arrest late Wednesday afternoon of G.M. Smith, Chester Justice, and Glen Braemer, Black Diamond mine workers, and the lodging of the trio in the King County jail, awaiting probable charges of burglary.

The arrests were made by Deputy Sheriff Tom Smith of Enumclaw, Highway Patrolman Bill Ross of Buckley, and Deputy Sheriffs Allingham and Sears, of Seattle—less than twenty-four hours after Tethaway and Jack Rudgers had reported to Enumclaw police the burglary of their respective service stations at Green River Gorge. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1994

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

A “love affair” with Selleck was evident at the reunion September 18 at the old grade school. Amandus Carlyle Butcher summed up the emotional attachment to the old sawmill town: “I love this country.”

Butcher went to all the first eight grades in Selleck and said it was the best place in the world to grow up.

His dad built the Kangley tavern in 1927 and ran it until 1932 while working days at the sawmill. Butcher hasn’t moved very far away, residing in Maple Valley. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, May 1999

By Margie Markus

Some things we remember about Selleck. I gathered some of my information from articles I have on Selleck. Some came from my memories and my mother’s memories (Eva Litras).

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

Growing up as a little girl I lived at Elkcoal (mining town). It was about five miles from the town of Selleck.

I have many fond memories of growing up in that area and going to school at Selleck grade school which had first to the eighth grade, and then to Enumclaw to high school.

The original schoolhouse suffered a devastating fire in 1929. It was rebuilt in 1930 on the same site and is currently being used as an office and shop. (more…)

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