Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Maple Valley’

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, September 4, 1987

By Debra Nelson

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Coal mining… the words evoke images of dark mine shafts, dynamite, and hardy men, exhausted from the hazards of blasting the mineral from deep within the earth, ravaged by black lung disease.

The old folk song “Sixteen Tons” tells that story—of men who rarely saw the sun and whose blood and sweat made coal the major industry in the Black Diamond region until the 1920s.

But those were the “good old days” of coal mining and, fortunately, the industry has undergone radical changes. For one thing, today’s miners work above ground, in the hot summer sun and the cold winter rain.

This Labor Day weekend, Black Diamond looks back at the old days, remembering those pioneers and miners who settled the town. The festivities include the kind of fun and games many pioneer kids enjoyed. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 16, 1987

By Eulalia Tollefson

Bill Petchnick, Jr. was honored by his Black Diamond friends and neighbors, who chose him Black Diamond’s Person of the Year.

Bill Petchnick, Jr. was honored by his Black Diamond friends and neighbors, who chose him Black Diamond’s Person of the Year.

Clowns, cute kiddies, and a carnival atmosphere—all ingredients for a great community celebration—greeted crowds who arrived for one of the best ever Black Diamond Labor Day festivals.

Enjoyment was enhanced by games, good food, and a “hi, neighbor” element, along with balmy, sunny weather.

Highlights of the celebration were the 56-entry parade directed by Charlene Birklid and the presentation of Labor Day dignitaries, with Diane Olson serving as emcee. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 6, 1975

“A family outing close to home” is how Pacific Northwest Bell’s local community relations team describes a Telephone Open House planned for Maple Valley this coming Saturday, August 9.

It will be held at the Maple Valley Central Office, across from the Post Office, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event is organized by volunteer members of the Maple Valley-Renton Community Relations Team, who are telephone employees living or working in the area.

Visitors will be able to observe the central office equipment in action. Team members will be on hand to answer questions concerning all displays.

C.R. team chairman Gary Habenicht acknowledges that few people are aware of the existence of a local telephone central office, and that one of the objectives of his team is to improve community relations and develop awareness. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, July 1994

By Barbara Nilson
Based on taped interview by Bill McDermand in November 1993 and interview by Barbara and Edward Nilson in June 1994.

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

But the road to the outfield of the Boston Red Sox in the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals wasn’t easy.

He was born in Taylor in 1912 to Veronica and Michael Lazor (pronounced Lawser in the Valley but known as Laser like the beam in baseball circles) who had immigrated from Czechoslovakia. His folks met in New York in the 1890s and went to Franklin around 1908 for his Dad to work in the mines dumping cars. They then moved to Taylor where the first of four children were born.

The oldest was Mary, born in 1908, then Mike, 1910, and Johnny was next. In 1914 the family moved onto their 20-acre farm in Hobart and the youngest boy, Vincent was born.

His folks paid $10 an acre for the farm, which they sold in 1969 to the Bill McDermand family. It is located on the old road to Taylor (S.E. 208th St.) on the north side. When his folks moved here it had all been logged off, but huge stumps remained. Lazor said it took a box and a half of powder just to blow them open. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 10, 1977

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

A number of friends, co-workers, and their spouses brought refreshments and gifts on Saturday afternoon, July 30, to the Maple Valley railroad station to wish Don Vernor well upon his retirement as dispatcher and telegrapher after nearly 33 years at that post.

He had been “on the job” in Maple Valley since January 1945. For three years prior to that he worked as dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada.

“A train dispatcher’s job,” Vernor explains, “is to keep track at all times of the trains in his area. We always have telephone contact station to station.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 26, 1978

By Bill Ziegner

What’s new in the valley? This $600,000 all-steel building promises to be the latest and one of the really famous attractions in this area. It will house the Cedar Downs Equestrian Center, largest privately-owned facility of its kind in the Northwest. It is scheduled for completion September 1, and the first function will be a show for the benefit of the Greater Maple Valley Community Center, according to Richard Burke, Equestrian Center president. —VOICE photo by Bob Gerbing.

What’s new in the valley? This $600,000 all-steel building promises to be the latest and one of the really famous attractions in this area. It will house the Cedar Downs Equestrian Center, largest privately-owned facility of its kind in the Northwest. It is scheduled for completion September 1, and the first function will be a show for the benefit of the Greater Maple Valley Community Center, according to Richard Burke, Equestrian Center president. —VOICE photo by Bob Gerbing.

The largest privately-owned equestrian center in the Northwest is nearing completion at Cedar Downs, off Witte Road in Maple Valley. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 25, 1973

Up it goes! The long-awaited reader board and bus shelter is on its way! Lions’ Club workers hope to have it completed soon.

Up it goes! The long-awaited reader board and bus shelter is on its way! Lions’ Club workers hope to have it completed soon.

The Maple Valley Lions Club has received authorization from Burlington Northern Railroad, the State of Washington, and King County to proceed with the construction of a new lighted reader board and bus stop in downtown Maple Valley.

The reader board will scale 16 feet in height and will be about 14 feet wide. It will be located at the Lions’ Park across from the Maple Valley Serve-U store. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »