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Posts Tagged ‘Maple Valley’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2005

By Barbara Nilson

Francis Niemela displays a sketch of the cabin his father Charles built of railroad ties on Lake Francis in 1915.

Francis Niemela displays a sketch of the cabin his father Charles built of railroad ties on Lake Francis in 1915.

Eighty-four years of memories will be on tap, Sunday, Feb. 12, [2006,] at the Grange Hall, when Francis Niemela recalls life with the Finnish community on Lake Francis. His parents, Charles and Katri Niemela, came to Maple Valley and purchased 20 acres at the lake in 1915.

During that time there was a railroad that came around the lake and his Dad picked up railroad ties and built his first house out of them. Later that building was converted to a sauna and also used for smoking salmon and bacon when they constructed a large loghouse in 1918. That home was later purchased by the Dufenhorst family.

The Finns at Lake Francis had little stump ranches and their saunas in place of indoor plumbing. Niemela said the greatest sauna was the Lahtinen’s. It was open house every Saturday night and Mrs. Lahtinen would serve coffee and goodies. “Some of the offspring of those Finns like Walt Sipila and Walt Miller are still here,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2007

Collected by Barbara Nilson

Christmas lists for Santa were very different 70-80 years ago. They were more wish list that never came because the Depression was rampant and an orange in one’s stocking was a wonderful, glorious discovery on Christmas morn.

The Christmas that June (Corkins) Kuhuski most remembered was in 1930. She was 10 years old and scanned the Sears Wish book and found this wonderful “Patty” doll. She said she knew it would be her last doll because she was getting older. She showed the picture to her mother who responded, “That is too expensive, better pick another one.”It was all of $2.00.

So June picked a less expensive one but really had her heart set on “Patty.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2006

By Wayne D. Greenleaf

My parents, Glen and Vera Greenleaf, moved to Maple Valley in August of 1937. I was 9 years old, my brother Kenneth was 11½. We were born in Centralia during the Great Depression. My Dad was a plasterer and bricklayer—no jobs in Centralia. My grandfather on my mother’s side and three of his children had bought land east of Fiddler’s Comer. He talked my folks into coming up and looking.

We bought 40 acres from Weyerhaeuser, northeast of Fiddler’s Corner, 1½ miles back in the woods. $600 total, no interest and $15 a month; if you couldn’t make the $15 month, they let it go. I think at one time we were over two years behind. (more…)

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By By JoAnne Matsumura and Cary Collins

One hundred years ago—at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918—World War I came to a close. There were cheers and tears, singing and dancing, hugging and kissing. Spirits ran high. The men and boys would soon be coming home to their families, wives, and sweethearts. The planning began.

From small towns to the big cities, Americans welcomed and greeted their heroes with bands playing. The doughboys arrived by boat, train, bus, and some lucky enough to catch a ride with their fellows heading in the same direction. There were parades, community gatherings, speeches of appreciation, and presentations of honor. Who could forget the long awaited taste of mom’s apple pie? (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 9, 1988

By McKay Jenkins

Remove the chain from the yellow caboose sitting in front of the Black Diamond Historical Society and you’ll open a door to the city’s history.

Inside, beneath the rotting ceilings and creaking floorboards, is a dilapidated testament to the men who once hauled their livelihoods from the bowels of the earth.

The museum that once housed the town’s train depot now has a train pulled up in front of the station. All that remains is a lot of restoration work for volunteers, said Bob Eaton, the museum’s president.

The caboose was built by Pacific Car and Foundry in Renton in 1921 for the Northern Pacific Railway. Weyerhaeuser then bought it to transport wood, and eventually gave it to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 7, 1979

The above plaque, now attached to the front of the Maple Valley Food Center building at SE 216th and Maple Valley Highway, was unveiled Saturday evening, Oct. 27, with Joe Mezzavilla and thirteen members of his immediate family in attendance. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 10, 1979

By D’Ann Pedee

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

A dream became a reality last week as a blue and gold Tahoma reader board was erected.

For years, students and school personnel have wanted a means to advertise school sports and other events. With student monetary support, parental donations and labor, and the blessing of administrators, the sign stood in place advertising a recent home game.

The board is located on SE 240th at the south edge of Tahoma’s campus and can be read from both the Kent and Maple Valley entrances to the school.

“This sign has been years in planning,” said Pete Ryan, athletic director who is currently in charge of the sign’s upkeep. (more…)

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