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Posts Tagged ‘Maple Valley’

By By JoAnne Matsumura and Cary Collins

One hundred years ago—at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918—World War I came to a close. There were cheers and tears, singing and dancing, hugging and kissing. Spirits ran high. The men and boys would soon be coming home to their families, wives, and sweethearts. The planning began.

From small towns to the big cities, Americans welcomed and greeted their heroes with bands playing. The doughboys arrived by boat, train, bus, and some lucky enough to catch a ride with their fellows heading in the same direction. There were parades, community gatherings, speeches of appreciation, and presentations of honor. Who could forget the long awaited taste of mom’s apple pie? (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 9, 1988

By McKay Jenkins

Remove the chain from the yellow caboose sitting in front of the Black Diamond Historical Society and you’ll open a door to the city’s history.

Inside, beneath the rotting ceilings and creaking floorboards, is a dilapidated testament to the men who once hauled their livelihoods from the bowels of the earth.

The museum that once housed the town’s train depot now has a train pulled up in front of the station. All that remains is a lot of restoration work for volunteers, said Bob Eaton, the museum’s president.

The caboose was built by Pacific Car and Foundry in Renton in 1921 for the Northern Pacific Railway. Weyerhaeuser then bought it to transport wood, and eventually gave it to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 7, 1979

The above plaque, now attached to the front of the Maple Valley Food Center building at SE 216th and Maple Valley Highway, was unveiled Saturday evening, Oct. 27, with Joe Mezzavilla and thirteen members of his immediate family in attendance. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 10, 1979

By D’Ann Pedee

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

A dream became a reality last week as a blue and gold Tahoma reader board was erected.

For years, students and school personnel have wanted a means to advertise school sports and other events. With student monetary support, parental donations and labor, and the blessing of administrators, the sign stood in place advertising a recent home game.

The board is located on SE 240th at the south edge of Tahoma’s campus and can be read from both the Kent and Maple Valley entrances to the school.

“This sign has been years in planning,” said Pete Ryan, athletic director who is currently in charge of the sign’s upkeep. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 26, 1979

Roy Freeman, architect of the proposed new county (shown above) still insists that, indeed, its time is here. Speaking at last week’s meeting of the Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce, Freeman says he has traveled 40,000 miles promoting the plan since 1972. The Create Cascade County group still has some left-over bumper stickers and $63 in the bank.

Cascade County, once formed, could make a go of it, Freeman said. The tax base in the proposed area has increased from $295 million in the early 1970s to more than $500 million. In 1974 he estimated $2.5 million was needed to run the new county, with tax revenue totaling $3.1 million.

“At present,” he argued, “we’re being run from Seattle.”

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 16, 1916

Deputy State’s Attorney says even printing appears to have been imitated in Maple Valley seizure

Wholesale forgery, not only of the signatures on liquor permits, but the printing also, was alleged this morning by Deputy Prosecuting Attorney John D. Carmody in connection with the seizure at a railroad station Thursday night at Maple Valley of eight fifty-gallon barrels of whiskey and 115 dozen quarts of beer.

The illegal liquor was consigned to the Rexall Pharmacy at Maple Valley, with instructions to notify the Rexall Pharmacy at Ravensdale. (more…)

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