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Posts Tagged ‘Maple Valley’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 22, 1988

From Johnson’s Corner up river. First position boat, Oh My Back V; second, Foss’ Grocery; third, M.V. Tile; fourth, Frank’s Meat II.

From Johnson’s Corner up river. First position boat, Oh My Back V; second, Foss’ Grocery; third, M.V. Tile; fourth, Frank’s Meat II.

Records tumbled like swift water through the “boulder yard” on the Cedar River June 11 as the seventh annual running of the Dinghy Derby Boat Race provided plenty of excitement for the throngs of race fans who turned out this beautiful Saturday afternoon.

The race, which is limited to dinghies under 12 feet with a paddler in front and a rower behind, was this year dedicated to “Big” Mike Williams.

Veteran starter Jim Holder, along with long-time officials Larry Johnson and Harry Honnold sent ten dinghy and eight rafts down the 4.6 mile course (from the Maple Valley Bridge to the Lions Club Park) at 30 second intervals. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 18, 1980

An arson fire completely gutted the Four Corners Tavern during early morning hours on June 10.

An arson fire completely gutted the Four Corners Tavern during early morning hours on June 10.

The Four Comers Tavern, 26818 Maple Valley-Black Diamond Road, was totally destroyed in an arson fire last week.

Engine companies from Fire District 43, 37, and 44 responded to the four-alarm fire which began about 2:30 a.m. on Tuesday, June 10. About 50 firemen fought the blaze for nearly an hour and a half before getting it under control. Highway 169 was closed by police until 5:30 in the morning to aid the firefighters.

The King County Fire Investigation Unit has determined that the fire had multiple points of origin and was a definite arson. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 18, 1978

By Joan Mann

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

Venerable 73-year-old farmhouse with ten bedrooms is the home of Pat Brunton. It also is a Maple Valley institution. When she and her husband, the late Frederic K. Brunton, purchased the house with its surrounding 67 acres, they did not realize they also were getting a chapter in the history of the valley.

The house was built in 1905 by railroad contractor Olaf Olson, who built the narrow-gauge railway to the Monte Cristo mines and the tunnels through Rogers Pass for Canadian Pacific trains and constructed a tunnel through the Cascades for the Milwaukee Railroad. The walls of the house are solid concrete, a material familiar to Olson, all of it mixed by hand and poured by laborers who lived in tents on the site during construction. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 14, 1950

The sleek waters of Lake Wilderness beckon vacationers either for a refreshing swim or shoving off for a row. The latter activity is exactly what Elaine Borell and Shirley Demko, students of Buckley Division, White River High School are enjoying.— Times photo by Royal Crooks.

The sleek waters of Lake Wilderness beckon vacationers either for a refreshing swim or shoving off for a row. The latter activity is exactly what Elaine Borell and Shirley Demko, students of Buckley Division, White River High School are enjoying.— Times photo by Royal Crooks.

Newest of resort hotels within a few miles of Seattle is Lake Wilderness Lodge, scheduled for completion this month as an addition to Kain Gaffney’s large picnic park on the west shore of Lake Wilderness.

With an eye to enticing air travelers of the future, Gaffney has installed a convenient air strip immediately adjoining the building and provided ample tie-down space for planes

An investment of $250,000 is represented in the hotel and landing field. The building, of modern design, has walls mainly of glass. Every room looks out upon the lake, with its wooded shore line and numerous boats. There are but 12 rooms for overnight guests, but large dinner groups will be welcome. The regular dining room has a seating capacity of 140; banquet rooms on the ground floor will accommodate 400 and catering will be geared to accommodate conventions.

In order to use advantageously the sloping site on the shore, the lodge has been constructed on four floor levels, centered around a staircase of spectacular design, circling a mammoth totem pole, ax-carved by the sculptor, Dudley Carter. The huge timber is four feet in diameter and 30 feet from base to top, with designs its entire length.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 12, 1960

Jack Hayes, 90 years old Tuesday, recalls early-day logging and mining at Renton

By Morda Slauson

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

A man who has been a Washingtonian since 1872 will celebrate his 90th birthday anniversary Tuesday.

He is John E. Hayes, 1734 Alki Av., known affectionatly as “Jack” to hundreds of South King County residents. Until recently, he resided at Renton, his home most of the years since 1880.

Hayes remembers old-time hay and potato fields where the big, new shopping center was built in the past year at the foot of Earlington Hill.

As a boy, he greased skids for the first logging at the Highlands, east of Renton. Now, modern machinery is tearing up the hillside to extend a state highway.

As a man he owned a homestead at Buffalo Station, on Rainier Avenue, which was taken by the government in the Second World War for expansion of Renton Airport.

On a recent trip around Renton, Hayes surveyed the shopping center and remembered when he went “hitching” in the hay fields, belonging to Erasmus Smithers, who with J.P. Morris and C.B. Shattuck, plotted the town of Renton in 1878. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Tmes, June 9, 1968

A waterwheel built in 1888 to power a sawmill and blacksmith shop on the Horrocks ranch in Maple Valley will be preserved by the developers of Four Lakes, a residential district.

A waterwheel built in 1888 to power a sawmill and blacksmith shop on the Horrocks ranch in Maple Valley will be preserved by the developers of Four Lakes, a residential district.

Site preparation has begun on a 200-acre residential area on Cedar Grove Road in Maple Valley by the Four Lakes Development Co.

Four Lakes will have three quarters of a mile road frontage between the Hobart Road and the Maple Valley Highway.

Price range for the 150 lots of one to two and a half acres will be from $3,500 to $10,000, according to Walter Schaefer, president of the Four Lakes Co. Sales will begin in mid-June.

Four Lakes will offer a historic green-belt approach with a waterwheel and a blacksmith shop built shortly after the land was bought from the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1885 to be preserved.

Schaefer acquired the property this year from David Horrocks, grandson of James Horrocks, who pioneered the property. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 7, 1978

By D’Ann Pedee

Clutching blue and silver trophies, the Petchnick brothers appeared tired but happy after repeating as winners in the Cedar River Men’s Boat Race last Saturday. Their craft was sponsored by the Good Earth Works. On the left is Dan Petchnick alongside Rudy Petchnick. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

Clutching blue and silver trophies, the Petchnick brothers appeared tired but happy after repeating as winners in the Cedar River Men’s Boat Race last Saturday. Their craft was sponsored by the Good Earth Works. On the left is Dan Petchnick alongside Rudy Petchnick. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

They poured it on and then they poured it in.

The team with champagne tastes, the Petchnick brothers, with 86-degree sun sapping their strength, poured on power to win the 1978 Cedar River Boat Race last Saturday, June 3.

At award time, they downed champagne while clutching blue and silver trophies for fastest time of one hour, five minutes and 53 seconds in the endurance contest which began at Landsburg and ended at Cedar Grove.

Their craft, Screamin’ Eagle, which was sponsored by Good Earth Works, also took trophies for best-looking boat of the 18 entries in men’s and women’s boats. The boat was painted baby blue with an eagle on the side. (more…)

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