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Posts Tagged ‘Renton’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 16, 1987

By Eulalia Tollefson

Bill Petchnick, Jr. was honored by his Black Diamond friends and neighbors, who chose him Black Diamond’s Person of the Year.

Bill Petchnick, Jr. was honored by his Black Diamond friends and neighbors, who chose him Black Diamond’s Person of the Year.

Clowns, cute kiddies, and a carnival atmosphere—all ingredients for a great community celebration—greeted crowds who arrived for one of the best ever Black Diamond Labor Day festivals.

Enjoyment was enhanced by games, good food, and a “hi, neighbor” element, along with balmy, sunny weather.

Highlights of the celebration were the 56-entry parade directed by Charlene Birklid and the presentation of Labor Day dignitaries, with Diane Olson serving as emcee. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, July 1994

By Barbara Nilson
Based on taped interview by Bill McDermand in November 1993 and interview by Barbara and Edward Nilson in June 1994.

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

But the road to the outfield of the Boston Red Sox in the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals wasn’t easy.

He was born in Taylor in 1912 to Veronica and Michael Lazor (pronounced Lawser in the Valley but known as Laser like the beam in baseball circles) who had immigrated from Czechoslovakia. His folks met in New York in the 1890s and went to Franklin around 1908 for his Dad to work in the mines dumping cars. They then moved to Taylor where the first of four children were born.

The oldest was Mary, born in 1908, then Mike, 1910, and Johnny was next. In 1914 the family moved onto their 20-acre farm in Hobart and the youngest boy, Vincent was born.

His folks paid $10 an acre for the farm, which they sold in 1969 to the Bill McDermand family. It is located on the old road to Taylor (S.E. 208th St.) on the north side. When his folks moved here it had all been logged off, but huge stumps remained. Lazor said it took a box and a half of powder just to blow them open. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 27, 1919

The fourth annual statewide mine rescue and first aid meet, to be held under the joint auspices of the United States Bureau of Mines, the state mine inspection department, the Washington Coal Operators’ Association, and District No. 10 of the United Mine Workers of America, will be staged at Black Diamond on Saturday, August 9, according to an announcement made by the executive committee in charge of arrangements. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 18, 1902

Everything moved out and no scent for the hounds

Detailed story of the chase of the past few days

By Larris Cain

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

The elusive Tracy has again given Sheriff Cudihee and his posse of picked men the slip, and has succeeded in escaping from one of the most cleverly laid plans to effect his capture that has been resorted to since his escape from the Oregon penitentiary.

Since last Saturday Tracy has occupied a deserted cabin on the east shore of Lake Sawyer, which is situated about midway between Covington, a small station on the Palmer cut-off, and Black Diamond. No more ideal hiding place could have been selected, for it is located in the heart of a wilderness which it is almost impossible to penetrate.

No more strategic location could have been desired, as it stood on a high part of the bank of the lake, which gave its occupant a sweeping view of that body of water; and any one approaching the cabin from that side could have been seen for at least a mile up and down its shores. To the rear is a wild forest with here and there a small path almost invisible on account of the recent growth of small brush. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 16, 1975

By D’Ann Pedee

Like the Olympia slogan, maybe “it’s the water.”

Then again, it could be the woods, or the peace, or the pace. Whatever “it” is, there is definitely a “something” which lures Maple Valley people back to Maple Valley.

And so it has been with Kathreen Mechem, an attorney who lives on Lake Sawyer. Although it took her thirty years, she is now back with a home on property which her family has owned for fifty years. (more…)

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