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Posts Tagged ‘Renton’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 5, 1911

Five may die, more than three score ill from effects of ptomaine taken in lemonade at Black Diamond

Merrymaking ends in ambulance ride

AUBURN, Wednesday, July 5 — Seventy persons are seriously ill, five of whom may not recover, from ptomaine poisoning swallowed with lemonade yesterday during a picnic at Black Diamond.

Miss Deva Stoliker, Miss Carm Russell, and Miss Grace Brown, all of Auburn, are dangerously ill. They were brought to this city after the picnic and local physicians say they have about an even chance for recovery.

Two other women of Black Diamond, whose names could not be learned, are in critical condition. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 4, 1955

Engineer dies in rail crash

One trainman was killed, and four others were injured in a collision of two Northern Pacific Railway freight trains about 11:15 o’clock this forenoon in Renton.

The dead man was identified tentatively by coroner’s deputies as W.C. Armstrong, Auburn, engineer. Armstrong and another trainman were trapped in the cab of a steam engine. The second man’s identity was not learned immediately. (more…)

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After it makes an emergency landing on Highway 169

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, June 30, 1994

By Cheryl Murfin
Valley Daily News

Cessna sits next to the Boots Tavern in Black Diamond after it made a 'miracle' landing on Highway 169. (Valley Daily News photo by Marcus R. Donner)

Cessna sits next to the Boots Tavern in Black Diamond after it made a ‘miracle’ landing on Highway 169. (Valley Daily News photo by Marcus R. Donner)

BLACK DIAMOND — Jerry Everett expects to see disabled vehicles when he pulls into his repair shop each morning. But he expects them to be automobiles, not airplanes.

Wednesday morning, he arrived to find a single-engine plane parked in his lot. It had been pushed to the side of the building by the plane’s pilot, assisted by patrons of a tavern next door, after an emergency landing on Highway 169 near Southeast 311th Street.

According to Black Diamond Police Lt. Kevin Esping, the Cessna 175’s pilot maneuvered around numerous utility lines to land on the narrow, two-lane road about 10 p.m. Tuesday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, June 28, 1989

By Kathleen Wilson

BLACK DIAMOND — Officials here seem to be one step closer to realizing a workable solution to the city’s sewer woes now that the Federal Environmental Protection Agency is studying a proposed direct pipeline to Metro.

The plan to run a connecting sewer pipeline from Black Diamond to Metro’s Renton sewage treatment plant was recently accepted by the state Department of Ecology, according to Bill Lee, wastewater consultant for the city. (more…)

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Family recalls his career and life on the farm

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2005

Story by Barbara Nilson
Photos by Sherrie Acker and Nilson

Warren Iverson greets Johnny Lazor’s children: Barbara Donckers, David Lazor, and Raymond Lazor at the dedication of the “Johnny Lazor Hobart Ball Field.” — Photo by Barbara Nilson

The Hobart ball field now bears the name “Johnny Lazor Hobart Ball Field.” A crowd of nearly 100 arrived on Saturday, May 14, to hear Warren Iverson recognize the people who were responsible for the restoration and renaming of the field.

A new flag pole was donated by Terry Seaman, a huge sign graces the back stop, and a plaque honoring Lazor’s baseball career has been placed on a stone at the entrance to the field.

On Sunday more than 150 people were on hand at the Hobart Community Church to hear the three Lazor children, David, Raymond, and Barbara, recall their Dad and life on the farm on SE 208th Street. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 16, 1911

With price of $50 to murder fellowman, Italian’s hand flutters and he temporizes with intended victim

Above are shown the Vella brothers and below is a picture of Cosenza, whom the brothers hired Arena to kill.

Two agree to split purse to be paid

Four men now in jail while sheriff’s deputies have narrow escape from engaging in death duel

Fifty dollars is the price of a human life, disposed with Camorra-like methods, in the county of King, according to the remarkable disclosures of Joe Cosenza, a coal miner whose life was spared by the weakening of the hired assassin.

In the arrest of the alleged plotters, in a mining hamlet shack at Franklin, Deputy Sheriff Scott Malone and City Detective Joe Bianchi had the closest calls of their lives early this morning, for Thomas Vella, Italian, and the two officers stood with revolvers leveled at one another for a minute, each trying to force the other to back down. The Italian’s nerve finally failed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 15, 1911

Quarterly apportionment made to various districts of King County

M.E. Durham, deputy county superintendent, yesterday completed the last quarterly apportionment to the various school districts of the county. The total amount distributed was $580,572.55, of which $314,662.19 was from the state fund and $265,909.86 from the county fund. The apportionment was 7.6 cents per day’s attendance and $75 per teacher employed.

Those districts receiving more than $1,200 were: Seattle, $46,394; Renton, $9,160; Kent, $8,327; Auburn, $7,935; Foster, $4,740; Enumclaw, $4,175; Black Diamond, $4,035; Bothell, $3,918; Oak Lake, $3,805; Issaquah, $3,124; Ravensdale, $2,084; Richmond, $1,989; Kennydale, $1,833; Bellevue, $1,779; Kirkland, $1,700; Newcastle, $1,676; Redmond, $1,601; North Bend, $1,518; Des Moines, $1,520; Fall City, $1,337; Pacific, $1,218.

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 14, 1989

Black Diamond’s Community Center Board voted unanimously Thursday to accept the First National Bank of Enumclaw’s offer of $285,000 for its abandoned bank building in Black Diamond. The center board plans to remodel the building for use as a senior and youth center.

The bank is selling the building for $40,000 less than the appraisal and will not rent space for a banking facility within the structure. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 11, 1916

Lake trip ideal for motorists

Magnificent scenery found on tour to White Sulphur Spring—road passes along Cedar River Gorge

Abundant sport waits fishermen’s coming

Beauty spots on scenic drive. Two river canyons, each leading back into the Cascades, are followed on the tour presented by The Times today, terminating at Lake Wilderness, twenty-nine miles distant from the city. The colored illustration shows The Times pathfinder car, the Hupmobile, as it arrived at the lake shore. Below, in the accompanying photograph, is a view of the Green River canyon, shortly after the car had crossed the hill from Black Diamond.

Less than thirty miles from Seattle, at the end of a pathway which leads through ever-changing scenery, along the magnificent Cedar River gorge and up into the mining section of King County, lies Lake Wilderness, towards which The Times pathfinder car, a Hupmobile, blazed the trail for the second of the 1916 series of tours and the twenty-sixth in the grand total thus far logged by this newspaper.

The car, kindly furnished by Mr. Louis P. Schaeffer of the William T. Patten Motor Company, and driven by D.P. Dean, left The Times Building at Second Avenue and Union Street shortly after 9 o’clock and was at Lake Wilderness in ample time to permit an hour’s fishing in the lake before noon as an appetizer.

During the afternoon, the return was made by way of Black Diamond and Auburn, a slightly longer route but well worth the extra effort. In addition to providing variety to the trip, the alternate highway descended into a country of splendid roads and fascinating scenery, joining the Pacific Highway thence into Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 27, 1926

Miss Velma Hull demonstrates the Simpson Signaling Life Line, invented by Homer Blair and used for the first time at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Burnett last Saturday. (more…)

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