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Posts Tagged ‘Renton’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1923

Beautiful trip close at hand: Trip to Lake Sawyer delights

Lovely body of water, studded with islands, lies straight east of Kent and thirty-one miles from Seattle

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Too many motorists, when planning their weekend or Sunday trips, consider only those run-ups that take one many miles away from Seattle. They have their eyes focused, so to speak, on the distant points and miss altogether the wholly delightful places close to home. Like the children in Maeterlinck’s play who sought the blue bird all over the world and returned, finally, to find it had been in their own home all the time.

One of the chief charms of this Puget Sound country, however, and one of the things that makes owning an automobile so enjoyable, is the fact that there are dozens and dozens of delightful trips within a range of forty miles out of Seattle. It is not necessary for motorists to range far afield, to drive miles and miles before reaching interesting and pretty country, as is true In the East and South.

Trip to Lake Sawyer

For instance, there is the trip taken by The Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe last week, the trip to Lake Sawyer. Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company, proposed the trip. Austin reasoned that it seemed rather foolish to ignore the scenic attractions close to home and he promised that the trip would prove a pleasant surprise, so down Rainier Valley the Oakland started. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 21, 1978

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Maple Valley’s first store sits proudly in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place and it is almost unnoticed.

Built about 1896, owned and run successively by William D. Gibbon and Joe Mezzavilla, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley.

According to Jayne Wissel, King County historic site researcher, there are many unique structures of local historical significance in the Maple Valley area such as the Scholtman house, the Lagesson cabin, and the Hobart school buildings.

Local citizens and members of the Maple Valley Historical Society have aided in the locating and historical research of these sites. Some information has been gathered on many more sites. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 2, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Our glimpse into the world of Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR) continues with a photo of Conductor J.F. Bow, shown here in his office inside the caboose. The conductor was the crew member on a train responsible for operational and safety duties which did not involve actual moving of the train.

Conductors typically helped trains run on time, completed en-route paperwork, collected tickets from passengers, and coupled and uncoupled cars when drop-offs or hook-ups were made. When trains needed to move in reverse, the conductor controlled backing movement while from his perch in the caboose, traditionally the last car on a train. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 26, 2016

By Bill Kombol

The old callboard of the C&PS can be seen slightly above the new board installed in the PCRR terminals at South Alaskan Way near Dearborn on the Seattle waterfront – just west of CenturyLink stadium.

The old callboard of the C&PS can be seen slightly above the new board installed in the PCRR terminals at South Alaskan Way near Dearborn on the Seattle waterfront – just west of CenturyLink stadium.

This is the second of a series, which details the workings of the Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR) late in its corporate life. Founding as the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad (C&PS), from the ashes of the Seattle & Walla Walla, PCRR was profiled in a 1948 Rotogravure magazine, which included this photo of the engine dispatcher’s board. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 19, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This January 20, 1948 photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This January 20, 1948, photo shows a PCRR engine pulling loaded coal cars as they cross over the Cedar River near Maplewood Golf Course in Renton.

This column’s focus over the next several weeks will be the Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR), previously known as the Columbia & Puget Sound (C&PS). Perhaps no other single venture was more important to the development of the Maple Valley–Black Diamond area than the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 9, 1897

Receiver C.J. Smith of the Oregon Improvement Company, has already started work on the task of broadening the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, for which he recently obtained authority from the Federal court.

Monday he let a contract for the materials to be used in the construction of the eighty coal and flat cars which will be built here. A force of men has already been set at work preparing the roadbed for the forthcoming change.

Three truss bridges will be practically rebuilt. That at Renton, another at Maple Valley, and a third east of Renton and known as No. 12 will be treated in this manner.

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