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Posts Tagged ‘Renton’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 20, 1906

Renton, Ravensdale, and Black Diamond did not play league games last Sunday because they would not agree to play each other owing to the rivalry which exists between them. These towns are unfortunately limited to playing Seattle teams or play among themselves and as the Seattle aggregation have their hands full making the rounds, the teams from the south district are occasionally without games. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, July 4, 1908

Deputy detailed to catch criminal abandons the chase

Must the law take a holiday?

If so there is a man who attempted murder in King County today who is escaping the consequences of his crime.

After a few hours of half-hearted work last night the pursuit of John Willard, aged 58, a farmer living in Maple Valley, at the foot of Cedar Mountain, who attempted murder, according to his own wife’s statement, has been dropped for the time being. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 26, 1966

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

At one time, coal mining was a big operation in the Puget Sound area. Before the turn of the century, the black gold was being dug from foothill sites such as Carbonado and Black Diamond, Newcastle and Franklin, Renton and Ravensdale, Coal Creek and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 12, 1960

Jack Hayes, 90 years old Tuesday, recalls early-day logging and mining at Renton

By Morda Slauson

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

A man who has been a Washingtonian since 1872 will celebrate his 90th birthday anniversary Tuesday.

He is John E. Hayes, 1734 Alki Av., known affectionatly as “Jack” to hundreds of South King County residents. Until recently, he resided at Renton, his home most of the years since 1880.

Hayes remembers old-time hay and potato fields where the big, new shopping center was built in the past year at the foot of Earlington Hill.

As a boy, he greased skids for the first logging at the Highlands, east of Renton. Now, modern machinery is tearing up the hillside to extend a state highway.

As a man he owned a homestead at Buffalo Station, on Rainier Avenue, which was taken by the government in the Second World War for expansion of Renton Airport.

On a recent trip around Renton, Hayes surveyed the shopping center and remembered when he went “hitching” in the hay fields, belonging to Erasmus Smithers, who with J.P. Morris and C.B. Shattuck, plotted the town of Renton in 1878. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 7, 1978

The following material has been presented to the Voice by Ann Phinney after the sale of the Phinney part of the “Burtenshaw property” they owned many years.

“This is the history of the Burtenshaw homestead as written by the oldest daughter, Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian, and given to us July 6, 1953, after we bought the homestead in the summer of 1951,” Mrs. Phinney says.

By Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

William A. Burtenshaw came to Washington Territory from Oregon, driving a team of horses across the country by the Overland route.

During the winter of 1884 he drove the first team of horses into Maple Valley, where previous to this time there were but two yoke of oxen.

He filed on the homestead of 120 acres situated twelve miles east of Renton (This land extended up to and included the little house, which used to be the Shaw’s store, by the now Junior High—note by AHP.)

The family lived in a tent two years. In 1886 he built the first house. Soon after that he built the first part of the barn. A few years later he added the larger part. (more…)

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