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Posts Tagged ‘Renton’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 7, 1925

Before sailing for the four thousand mile trip to Japan, where they will act as a convoy to Lieut. Col. Pedro L. Zanni, intrepid Argentine army aviator, the two 100-foot North Sea trawlers shown in the halftone above, called at the bunkers of the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Seattle to load fuel for the hazardous voyage.

The two staunch little vessels are the Canada and the Imbricaria, both of which have been chartered by the Argentine government to patrol the route across the Pacific recently followed by the globe-girdling American army flyers. This will be the course which Col. Zanni will take, winging his way eastward from Japan. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 16, 1925

Thousands of Diamond Briquets have been shipped into the Yakima Valley this spring to protect the blossoming fruit trees from damage due to killing frosts. Throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington more than one hundred thousand briquet heaters are now playing their part in the production of bumper crops by radiating the warm glow of red hot briquets against the heretofore invulnerable attacks of Jack Frost.

The scene depicted herewith shows a shipment of Diamond Briquets being unloaded at the yards of Western Fuel Company in Yakima. The trucks are loading fuel to go to the orchards. At the same time, while being so extensively burned in the fruit districts, briquets are continuing to grow in popularity for use in logging operations and for steam shovel use, to say nothing of domestic demand. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, April 12, 1923

Local banks and Renton agency co-operating in new Ford plan

A new plan for purchasing Ford cars whereby prospective purchasers may avail themselves of banking facilities and start an account with which to buy a car is announced today by the Ford Motor Company and by banks with whom Ford dealers do business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 9, 1925

Playing together for the first time this season, the soccer football squad at Newcastle has been one of the strong contenders for honors in the state league. The camp has loyally supported the boys and in turn the players have been a credit to the camp. One of the team, Bert Blondell, was chosen to play with the Washington All-Stars in the game against the All-Stars of Victoria, B.C.

In the picture, from left to right standing: Tim Riley, Jack Lucas, Don Campbell, Bert Blondell, Jock Clark, Jim Strang, Bob Gelling, Dave Forbes, Jimmy Walton, Joe Oschberger, and W.S. Hart. In front, left to right: Dan Minele, Bob Miles, C. Mikola, Arthur Kelly, Gus Lapsansky, Ted Jackson, captain of the team, Harold Phillips, Jim McCarthy, “Hen” Roberts. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, March 19, 1908

Hold-up man attempts to rob Maple Valley saloon, but bartender resists—robber escapes and is arrested in Seattle

After having on Tuesday night engaged in a desperate hand-to-hand fight with the bartender of Pat Quinnan’s saloon at Maple Valley, while attempting to hold up the place, as a result of which he escaped minus his coat, mask, and hat, Ben Dixon, aged 26, was captured last evening in his room at the Alaska Commercial hotel in this city. The arrest was made by Deputy Sheriff Matt Starwich and his assistant, Matt O’Grady, of Ravensdale. (more…)

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