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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 12, 1924

Summer time in Juneau, Alaska, is not the most favorable season in which to sell coal to the domestic consumer. But the view shown herewith of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Juneau depot, taken in the month of July, shows not a truck in sight. This is because Agent H.G. Walmsley had them all out making deliveries, even though the mid-day sun made a shady corner most inviting. “Walms” was formerly a company employee at Newcastle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 13, 1978

By R. Dianne Wilson

Rain joined the powerful spray from competing fire districts, obstructing view of the red barrel slithering on the high wire and doused from side to side by the competitors. The event was one of the highlights at Black Diamond’s recent Labor Day festivities.

Rain joined the powerful spray from competing fire districts, obstructing view of the red barrel slithering on the high wire and doused from side to side by the competitors. The event was one of the highlights at Black Diamond’s recent Labor Day festivities.

Despite rather poor cooperation from Mother Nature, Black Diamond’s Labor Day was a colorful occasion for participants and spectators alike. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 20, 1913

Shift boss and fire boss are victims of mysterious blazes

BLACK DIAMOND, Saturday, Aug. 16. – Two mysterious fires have occurred in the last two days, one of which completely destroyed the home of Hughie Hughes, a shift boss, and the other partially destroying the dwelling of Jack Larson, a fire boss in the mines.

Hughes’ loss is about $1,000 and Larson’s about $500, with no insurance.

For more about the mysterious fires of 1913, go to:

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, August 31, 1988

BLACK DIAMOND — Thousands of people are expected to take a break from work at the annual Black Diamond Labor Day festival this weekend.

An adult dance opens the celebration Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., at the Black Diamond Eagles Hall. A midnight buffet will be served, and “White Water” will provide the music.

Marching bands, antique cars, children’s groups, floats, and horses will participate in Monday’s parade, which begins at 10 a.m. The parade travels on Highway 169 from Third and Lawson streets to the baseball diamond at Black Diamond Elementary School. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 17, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

The Northern Pacific train depot at Lester, Washington, as seen around 1910, now demolished. (Wikipedia)

The Northern Pacific train depot at Lester, Washington, as seen around 1910, now demolished. (Wikipedia)

The Lester depot, built in 1886, has been designated as a county landmark by the King County Landmarks Commission, because of its significant association with early-day railroading which gave the Puget Sound area its first direct line across the Cascade Mountains to the East.

The depot—sold by Burlington Northern Railroad last week to a Woodinville developer for $1—joins a growing list of historically important structures which are protected from alterations that would change their character.

In the future, any contemplated changes affecting the depot must meet the approval of the Landmarks Commission. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, August 14, 1995

By Lyle Price
Valley Daily News

Maple Valley grade school’s exterior hasn’t changed much in 75 years. (Valley Daily News photos by Marcus R. Donner.)

Maple Valley grade school’s exterior hasn’t changed much in 75 years. (Valley Daily News photos by Marcus R. Donner.)

MAPLE VALLEY—At 75, the former Maple Valley Grade School may be showing its age, but it is far from retired.

In fact, it could get a face-lift to extend its life well into the next century.

No longer home to students, the eye-catching brick building serves as headquarters for the Tahoma School District’s maintenance and transportation operations.

In addition, the Maple Valley Historical Society operates a museum on the top floor, under a 10-year lease from the district. (more…)

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