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Archive for the ‘Buildings’ Category

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 26, 1978

By Bill Ziegner

What’s new in the valley? This $600,000 all-steel building promises to be the latest and one of the really famous attractions in this area. It will house the Cedar Downs Equestrian Center, largest privately-owned facility of its kind in the Northwest. It is scheduled for completion September 1, and the first function will be a show for the benefit of the Greater Maple Valley Community Center, according to Richard Burke, Equestrian Center president. —VOICE photo by Bob Gerbing.

What’s new in the valley? This $600,000 all-steel building promises to be the latest and one of the really famous attractions in this area. It will house the Cedar Downs Equestrian Center, largest privately-owned facility of its kind in the Northwest. It is scheduled for completion September 1, and the first function will be a show for the benefit of the Greater Maple Valley Community Center, according to Richard Burke, Equestrian Center president. —VOICE photo by Bob Gerbing.

The largest privately-owned equestrian center in the Northwest is nearing completion at Cedar Downs, off Witte Road in Maple Valley. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 23, 1924

Pacific Coast Co. Hotel

The 67-room Black Diamond Hotel was across the street from the depot/museum, where the Eagles are today.

Crazed temporarily by moonshine, deputy sheriffs charge, Richard Gunner, 38 years old, a miner, armed with a revolver, went on a rampage in the Black Diamond Hotel in Black Diamond, shooting another miner and ending up in the King County jail.

Gunner appeared at the hotel during the evening, the officers were informed, and threatened to slay anyone who would attempt to keep him from obtaining revenge against a real or fancied rival. He left but returned, shouting that he intended to “get someone,” and began firing. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 16, 1913

Manager of Pacific Coast’s interests announces corporation’s plans for expenditure of nearly $150,000

Petroleum will be refined as side line: Asphalt used as binder for raw material to be manufactured from crude oil at factory on lake

Briquetville occupied 20 acres east of the Shuffleton steam plant—an area today that partly encompasses Gene Coulon Park.

Plans for the immediate construction of a briquetting plant near the south end of Lake Washington, within a mile of Renton, the first unit of which will cost between $125,000 and $150,000, were announced yesterday by James Anderson, general manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, which will build the plant. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 13, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

In June 1977, the tavern’s trademark 22-foot-long showpiece bar, inlaid with 400 silver dollars, was stolen and never recovered.

In June 1977, the tavern’s trademark 22-foot-long showpiece bar, inlaid with 400 silver dollars, was stolen and never recovered.

Feelings ran high last week with the appearance of Rick King, owner of Morganville Tavern, at the Black Diamond City Council meeting. King made an impassioned plea for council support in obtaining a new liquor license from the Liquor Control Board.

A “standing room only” crowd filled the chamber as King detailed his family’s urgent need to reopen the tavern which has been closed for several months. He stated that he and his wife have lost more than $10,000 since the people who bought it last year reneged on their payments. The Kings had to use eviction proceedings and take repossession.

The people also took the liquor license and have refused to sign it back to King. According to King, the tavern represents his only way to provide for his family and that their entire life savings are involved. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 12, 1978

By Bill Ziegner

Recognize it? The above photo shows Wilderness Village as it looked nearly 25 years ago. A lot has happened since, as indicated by today’s appearance as seen in the recent photo below. This coming Saturday, July 15, merchants of the Wilderness Village Shopping Center will be observing their 16th anniversary.

Recognize it? The above photo shows Wilderness Village as it looked nearly 25 years ago. A lot has happened since, as indicated by today’s appearance as seen in the recent photo below. This coming Saturday, July 15, merchants of the Wilderness Village Shopping Center will be observing their 16th anniversary.

Sixteen years of steady growth and progress will be observed by the merchants of the Wilderness Village Shopping Center this coming Saturday, July 15.

The “Village” is the largest operation of its kind in the Greater Maple Valley area, its land area consisting of ten business zoned acres with nine more potential business acres in reserve. Its buildings, which contain over 57,000 square feet, house 29 business firms employing some 150 persons. The Village’s net worth is in excess of 2 million dollars.

Additional expansion is being planned for the near future, according to owner Joe Flynn, on five adjoining acres south of the Village. (more…)

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