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Archive for the ‘Buildings’ Category

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 14, 1976

By D’Ann Pedee

Bicentennial quilt: Thirty Maple Valley women are now putting the finishing touches on a handcrafted quilt as part of their Bicentennial year activities. The thirty patches, some of which are shown above, will depict this area historically, spotlighting some of its past and present. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

How do you place a value on a handcrafted quilt?

Perhaps by the amount of money it can be sold for or by averaging the time and services spent in completing it.

When finished, the Maple Valley Arts Committee could possibly have a three-thousand-dollar product on its hands. That’s the amount of money it is hoped will raised by raffling be of the Bicentennial quilt that thirty local women are in the process of completing. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, April 12, 1914

Rebuilt sawmill costs $200,00

New plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., will begin operations June 1

Rebuilt plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., to be opened June 1.

On the site of its old plant at Selleck, Wash., which was destroyed by fire last January 3, the Pacific States Lumber Company has just completed the building of a new sawmill at a cost of about $200,000. Work now is in progress installing the machinery, and it is expected to have the mill in operation June 1, with the capacity force of 350 men. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, April 12, 1923

Local banks and Renton agency co-operating in new Ford plan

A new plan for purchasing Ford cars whereby prospective purchasers may avail themselves of banking facilities and start an account with which to buy a car is announced today by the Ford Motor Company and by banks with whom Ford dealers do business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 10, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

Rainbow Sparkles Campfire group of Glacier Park Elementary pause before planting flowers along the driveway at the new Ravensdale post office, April 2. Back row: Lindsay Hanson, Annie Harris, Jenny Harris, Amanda Stam, Brittany Ferguson, and Desiree MacKinnon, assistant; front row: Emily Gillmore, Kaylie Holcomb of Shadow Lake, Samantha MacKinnon, and Elizabeth Burianek. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Streams of visitors surveyed the spacious new Ravensdale post office, April 2, some bearing gifts to the open house. Maple Woods Polygon donated two 6-foot cedar trees, Maple Valley Campfire troop planted bulbs, and guests contributed plants.

Guests were treated to cake decorated with a picture of the post office by CJs Bakery in Black Diamond. Jim Storer, owner of CJs, donated doughnuts for the occasion. The cake noted that the post office was celebrating 100 years of existence.

Postmaster Jennie Lee Noonan mused that the community has certainly changed from the first of the of 18 postmasters to today. The number of boxes in the new post office has doubled from the 547 when Noonan started in 1995 to 1,098 now.

At the turn of the century, the company town of Ravensdale was the third largest in King County and the nearby community of Georgetown supported 11 saloons and three dance halls, catering to the miners before the disaster of 1915 killed 31 miners. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 30, 1988

Hang a sharp right at the Cooper Tire sign outside the Bremmeyer Logging Co. shop, breeze through a shady patch of Douglas firs, and there it squats on a distant back corner of King County’s park at Ravensdale: the Gracie Hansen Building.

She was quite a gal, this Gracie, whose bare-breasted “Girlie Revue” both wowed and outraged Seattleites at the 1962 World’s Fair.

In those days the building was known as the Paradise International Nightclub. It was the hottest thing in town.

Now it’s as desolate as an abandoned farmhouse. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 6, 1927

Auburn party visits New Black Diamond Mine

Learn fine points of underground work at new property of Pacific Coast Coal Company

By Ellis Coe

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

To a novice in the coal mining business, who has never been further underground than the depth of his neighbor’s cellar, a trip of more than one mile into the heart of a mountain of coal is somewhat of an experience. Further than that, when blasting operations begin while this same novice is underground, it heightens the interest in the experience. The question as to whether the stay in the heart of the mountain will be permanent immediately enters the mind of the quasi coal digger, with the odds in favor of permanency. (more…)

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With smiles and shouts and laughter in which tears were very close to the surface, Seattle greeted 23 native sons and 178 Washington state dough-boys, comprising the Hoboken Casuals Company #144, at King Street Station that included Private Thomas Campbell of Hobart, Company K. 40th Engineers.

The Great Northern train which was taking the trainload of men to Camp Lewis, where they will be demobilized, only stopped in Seattle for ten minutes!

Seattle gave these men the most individual greeting that has been extended to any of the returning heroes. The men were immediately surrounded with a family group who loaded them with packages which looked like candy to while away the time between Seattle and Camp Lewis, and who ecstatically hugged anyone they could touch.

Many a soldier suffered a good-natured buffeting of a mother, wife, and sister all trying to say “hello” at once. Groups of friends besieged the men and gave them a Valentine greeting they will not soon forget.

More than four coaches of dough-boys were greeted by the Red Cross canteen workers with baskets of apples and cigarettes. One carload of men tumbled off to pose with the commanding officer of the company to a motion picture cameraman.

Welcome home Private Campbell!

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