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Archive for the ‘Buildings’ Category

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952

Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952The view of Maple Valley in autumn depicted on Page 1 of this Magazine Section appealed to Parker McAllister, Times staff artist, as most appropriate for inclusion in his series of rural scenes in the Puget Sound country. (more…)

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Originally published in Hobart Recollections, 1988

By Colin McDonald

Did you know that where the Hobart Fire Station now stands there was once a swamp?

In about 1931 (give or take a year) there was a swamp, starting at the corner of the Hobart and Taylor roads. It ran on about a 40- or 45-degree angle east, up close to where the old gym used to be.

The fill was made in a very unusual way, by today’s standards. In those days there was not a dump truck and bulldozer sitting on every corner. Mr. Bill Peacock, with his two horses, wagon, and Fresno scraper did the job over several months, hauling a yard to a yard and a half in each load. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 27, 1978

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Maple Valley Historical Society at its Sept. 18 meeting discussed three possible buildings or sites in the area which might qualify for inclusion in the State Historical Register or for block grant restoration money.

The gymnasium at the old Hobart School site was deemed the most historically significant building in that area by Jane Wissel, King County Historic Site researcher. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, May 1999

By Margie Markus

Some things we remember about Selleck. I gathered some of my information from articles I have on Selleck. Some came from my memories and my mother’s memories (Eva Litras).

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

Growing up as a little girl I lived at Elkcoal (mining town). It was about five miles from the town of Selleck.

I have many fond memories of growing up in that area and going to school at Selleck grade school which had first to the eighth grade, and then to Enumclaw to high school.

The original schoolhouse suffered a devastating fire in 1929. It was rebuilt in 1930 on the same site and is currently being used as an office and shop. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 1978

Long-sought water for Wilderness Village comes nearer everyday as men and heavy equipment dig through the earth and bury the pipe which will connect to the Seattle Water Department pipeline northeast of the Village. The ditch shown above will lead pipe under the Maple Valley Highway.

Long-sought water for Wilderness Village comes nearer everyday as men and heavy equipment dig through the earth and bury the pipe which will connect to the Seattle Water Department pipeline northeast of the Village. The ditch shown above will lead pipe under the Maple Valley Highway.

Any last doubts about Wilderness Village Shopping Center receiving its long-sought public water were dispelled last week as men and equipment moved in to begin the job.

Only one hole in the ground was visible as of last Thursday on the east side of Highway 169 at the Witte Road intersection. That’s near the planned beginning of the tap-in to the City of Seattle Pipeline. The actual connection will be made at the gravel pit, according to Bob Sloboden, manager of Water District 108.

Drilling is now in progress under lie highway, Sloboden added. Before long the pipe, now stacked at various locations around the shopping center, will be placed in the ground, beginning on Witte Road behind the Sea-First Bank. The pipe will proceed to the library only. The proposed professional center near the library is not receiving water at this time, Sloboden said.

“We’re getting the new line in little by little,” Sloboden said. “The contractor should be finished and the water should be flowing around the middle of September.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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