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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 11, 1979

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

It was “Wall Raising Day” at Four Corners on April 2 for the Coast-to-Coast Hardware store which will move from Wilderness Village to its new site this coming June.

Huge tilt-up panels of reinforced concrete were lifted into place by the crane operator and secured by a half dozen other skilled workmen within 6 ½ hours. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 1999

By Barbara Nilson

The Gibbon/Mezzavilla store now sits at its new home on the historical society site off of Witte Road. Work parties will begin this summer to bring new life into the historic building. – Photo by Barbara Nilson.

The Gibbon/Mezzavilla store now sits at its new home on the historical society site off of Witte Road. Work parties will begin this summer to bring new life into the historic building. – Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Cameras flashed in the snowy darkness of March 28 as the historic Gibbon/Mezzavilla store was pulled from its meadow resting place to breathe new life as a Maple Valley Historical Society project.

As it was towed past its second home site at 2 a.m. at the corner of the Maple Valley Highway and S.E. 216th Way, cameras tried to record the historic moment. Manning some of the cameras were Gary Gibbon and his son Lance, descendants of the store’s original owner, William Gibbon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 5, 1989

Groundbreakers were Ann Trullinger, project manager; Rosemary Konoske, branch manager; Rich Martindale, bank president; Philip E. Biege, chairman of the board; Rudy Petchnick, preliminary site work; Rick Driftmier, architect; and bulldozer operator Rick Fardig. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Groundbreakers were Ann Trullinger, project manager; Rosemary Konoske, branch manager; Rich Martindale, bank president; Philip E. Biege, chairman of the board; Rudy Petchnick, preliminary site work; Rick Driftmier, architect; and bulldozer operator Rick Fardig. (Photo by Doug Williams.)

Ground was broken last week on the 1.3 acre site of the First National Bank of Enumclaw’s new branch at Four Corners. The site is on the south side of Kent-Kangley Road near the road’s intersection with Highway 169, across the highway from the bank’s existing branch. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 28, 1979

If you enjoy Mexican food, the place to go on Tuesdays is the Black Diamond Sandwich Shop, reported the Voice of the Valley on January 12, 1976. Mr. & Mrs. George Wilson and their children, Erin and Eric, are the new owners of “The Black Diamond.”

If you enjoy Mexican food, the place to go on Tuesdays is the Black Diamond Sandwich Shop, reported the Voice of the Valley on January 12, 1976. Mr. & Mrs. George Wilson and their children, Erin and Eric, are the new owners of “The Black Diamond.”

Editor, the Voice, and friends:
There must be a song that says, “It’s hard to say goodbye.” If not, there should be.

Somewhere around April 1 or shortly thereafter, we will probably be closing the doors at “The Black Diamond,” the only cafe-drive-in in the city. We realize that many of you have seen businesses come and go, but it has been our first attempt at being in business ourselves and our first “going out of business.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe-News, March 19, 1976

Can you believe this is what our present museum building looked like in 1976 when our original “work parties” began? Left to right: Louis Zumek, Chuck Holtz, Carl Steiert, and Archie Eltz. (BDHS calendar series, 1986)

Can you believe this is what our present museum building looked like in 1976 when our original “work parties” began? Left to right: Louis Zumek, Chuck Holtz, Carl Steiert, and Archie Eltz. (BDHS calendar series, 1986)

Restoration of the circa 1885 train depot on Railroad Avenue in Black Diamond slowed down during cold weather, said Ann Steiert, member of Black Diamond Historical Society.

“Volunteers have been working on shoring up the foundation and as soon as the weather breaks they will finish jacking it up, put in some new timbers, and a concrete footing.

“We have applied for a grant from Washington Historical Society to make the depot into a museum, but the bulk of our working funds have come from the sale of our 13-month historical calendar. We have $1,500 to go toward furnishing and framing the interior.”

Ms. Steiert said the museum depot was most likely the first structure in Black Diamond when the Welsh miners from Nortonville, Calif., came to mine in Black Diamond.

“They probably pitched their tents around the depot before they built cabins,” she said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 9, 1983

By Val Varney
Times South bureau

Carl and Ann Steiert, officers of the Black Diamond Historical Society, outside the museum in Black Diamond. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times)

Carl and Ann Steiert, officers of the Black Diamond Historical Society, outside the museum in Black Diamond. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times)

Now that there is a place to store all the memorabilia of Black Diamond, members of the Black Diamond Historical Society are busy working on an addition to the former railroad depot, applying for grants and taping the memoirs of the old timers.

“When it’s completed,” said Ann Steiert, society secretary-treasurer, “we hope it can benefit the whole community.”

The museum project began as an offshoot America’s Bicentennial celebration in 1976. Some residents felt it was important to preserve local history. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 28, 1979

(The following article is the first in a series on people and organizations in Maple Valley written by students in the Beginning Journalism class at Tahoma High School. Diana Kalanquin, sophomore, interviewed Grange members and read Morda Slauson’s 100 Years on the Cedar for information on this Cedar Grange feature story.)

The Cedar Grange, 216th and Highway 169, is more than an empty hall but an institution dedicated to the well-being and prosperity of the community.

The Cedar Grange, 216th and Highway 169, is more than an empty hall but an institution dedicated to the well-being and prosperity of the community.

By Diana Kalanquin

Cedar Grange is more than an empty hall to the Valley. It is an institution interested in the well-being and prosperity of the community.

The Grange is the oldest farm organization in the country. Organized in 1867 it is non-partisan and does not contribute to any political party, support particular candidates, and is not owned by or obligated to any political figure, party, or administration. (more…)

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