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Archive for the ‘Buildings’ Category

Originally published in the Maple Valley Bugle, December 2015

By D’Ann Tedford

Built in 1891 on Renton-Maple Valley road, the restored W.D. Gibbon General Merchandise store and post office is now located on Witte Road. It is open to the public on the 1st Saturday of each month, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. See also http://www.maplevalleyhistorical.com.

Visiting history at Maple Valley Historical Society’s site on Witte Road, one sees the name “Gibbon” prominently displayed on the 124-year-old restored building, “W.D. Gibbon General Merchandise.” In its years, the store also served as Maple Valley’s post office and it held a barbershop, remnants of which are visible during tours.

Gibbon had studied to be an educator but acquired the store that had been built in 1891 on Renton-Maple Valley road. His wife Lizzie had attended Washington Territorial University (now U of W) and became the first school-teacher in Black Diamond, seven miles south of the general store. (more…)

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By JoAnne Matsumura

The Legion Hall, left—later the Roxy Theatre—is now the Chalet. The Liberty Theatre, right, was torn down in 1952. The Enumclaw Police Department anchors the corner today.

Enumclaw in the 1950s was bustling with new growth—businesses were upgrading storefronts and buildings and contractors were building new houses in new developments. In fact, residents were encouraged to invite newcomers, and to fix up, clean up, and beautify Enumclaw from top to bottom.

It happened at the Roxy in the 1950s

Do you remember?

  • The annual John Deere Day show.
  • When Technicolor movies were introduced in 1952.
  • Francis the Talking Mule, starring Donald O’Conner.
  • Has Anybody Seen My Gal? about the “Turbulent Twenties.”
  • Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis in Jumping Jacks.
  • Spencer Tracy and Gene Tierney in Plymouth Adventure.
  • “Family Night” for $1, regardless of the size of your family.
  • The new wide-screen Cinemascope, installed in 1954.

And the community responded with its well-known community spirit.

The growth spurred a varied entertainment scene throughout the city. The local newspaper covered the features at the theatres, the performers scheduled to entertain at school and church events, invitations to club events, and a host of other exciting activities for young and old alike.

Entertainment, by definition, is an activity that amuses one and thus entertains us with enjoyment, leisure, relaxation, recreation, and diversion from our daily routine. To entertain also entertains us as we entertain others. Amusements can range from a friendly card game to an elegant evening out with your “sweetie.”

But the local theatre was the place to be. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1925

Prosperous town on Naches Pass Highway surrounded by rich agricultural, timber, and mineral lands, is boasting of rapid development

New mill of the White River Lumber Company on the White River, three miles from Enumclaw.

One of the earliest settlements in that part of the state and the only place of that name in the United States, Enumclaw, forty miles southeast of Seattle, is one of the biggest little towns in the West.

Early history and distinctive name, however, are not Enumclaw’s only claims for attention. Thought its early growth was slow, Enumclaw today is counted one of the most prosperous towns in the Puget Sound region. Rich agricultural land, timber, and mineral surround it. It is on the Naches Pass highway, the most direct route between Seattle and the west entrance to Mount Rainier Nation Park. It is the gateway to unlimited scenic attractions, fishing, and hunting grounds. Backup up against the Cascade foothills, Enumclaw is within two hours’ drive of perpetual snow on one side and the waters of Puget Sound on the other. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, November 16, 2005

Wally’s World

By Wally DuChateau

Pick and Shovel restaurant and bar in Wilkeson.

Thirty years ago, over drinks with some local friends, I predicted the imminent demise of small-town Enumclaw. There wasn’t anything especially insightful about this prophecy. In fact, most of my friends agreed with me.

At the time, I also suggested that anyone nostalgic for Enumclaw’s vanishing small-town ambiance should migrate to Wilkeson or Carbonado. In general that advice has also proved sound.

Until recently. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 22, 1925

With representatives present from Renton and Seattle, together with mining men from over the state and the official family of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the New Black Diamond Mine was formally opened last Friday, October 16.

N.D. Moore, vice-president, pulled the switch which set off the final blast breaking down the 9-foot barrier of solid rock separating the two tunnels on which work had progressed for more than a year. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September and December 2006

By Barbara Nilson

JoAnn (Weibling) Klacson and Lois (Kelley) Bartholomew on a July visit to the MVHS museum. —Photo by Sherrie Acker

In July, JoAnn Weibling Klacsan visited the historical society’s Third Floor Museum, accompanied by her niece, Diane Lee Weibling, and chatted with Dick Peacock and Sherrie Acker about Kerriston. Neighbors of them were the Kelley girls, so Lois (Kelley) Bartholomew joined them at the museum to share memories.

The conversation was taped and part of it follows. In addition, Lois graciously, with a little arm twisting, allowed me to use part of the story she has written about growing up in Kerriston.

Klacsan recalled that all the houses in Kerriston in 1923 had underpinnings, and were all built on a side hill. “We had a porch with a lot of stairs and a nice view. The houses were shacks, all the same about 16′ x 18′. Close to the school there was a set of wooden steps that went down to the level below and us kids used to run down those steps.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2005

By Barbara Nilson

In February of 1952 this group posed outside the Maple Valley Tavern in front of Bea and Bill Smith's logging truck. They are: Pat Iverson, Harold Heflinger, Darlene Thompson, Bea and Bill Smith, Marie Loveck, and George Hale. — Photo from Christine (Paris) Norheim to Sherrie Acker.

In February of 1952 this group posed outside the Maple Valley Tavern in front of Bea and Bill Smith’s logging truck. They are: Pat Iverson, Harold Heflinger, Darlene Thompson, Bea and Bill Smith, Marie Loveck, and George Hale. — Photo from Christine (Paris) Norheim to Sherrie Acker.

Recently Christine (Paris) Norheim of Enumclaw was cleaning out her house preparing to move when she came across a small book of prints labeled, “These photos were taken in Feb. of 1952 in front of the Maple Valley Tavern.” She called Sherrie Acker, the niece of the owner of the tavern, Claude Bowman, and presented her with them. (more…)

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