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Archive for the ‘Buildings’ Category

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 1995

The old Lake Wilderness Conference building has new tenants and a new name. It is King County’s first community service center and be called Lake Wilderness Community Service Center. A grand opening is planned for August.

The old Lake Wilderness Conference building has new tenants and a new name. It is King County’s first community service center and be called Lake Wilderness Community Service Center. A grand opening is planned for August.

King County’s first Community Service Center located at Lake Wilderness Park in Maple Valley opens Wednesday, July 5, 1995 at 12 noon. King County Executive Gary Locke and community members will visit the Center at 1 p.m. A grand opening celebration will occur later in August. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 2, 1925

William Rose is fatally wounded during battle between citizens and desperadoes in Pierce County

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

In a revolver duel which followed the first bank robbery in the history of the town of Buckley, forty miles southeast of Seattle, in Pierce County, yesterday afternoon, two unmasked, unidentified desperadoes died “with their boots on,” and William Rose, 54 years old, business man of Buckley, was fatally wounded. Rose died in the Taylor-Lacey Hospital in Auburn at 8:15 o’clock this morning.

One of the bandits was shot from the running board of an automobile speeding away with the loot. The other was killed when he drove back for the body of his dead companion. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 28, 1989

Fourteen sites in Pierce County and two sites in King County have been selected as locations for Washington centennial historical markers.

Puget Sound Power and Light will donate the markers to be placed in about 85 communities throughout its nine-county service area.

The 10-inch-square markers will replicate the official centennial dome shape and will be cast in solid brass by Anacortes Brass Works. They will be presented during ceremonies to be held during the summer months. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 18, 1978

By Joan Mann

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

Venerable 73-year-old farmhouse with ten bedrooms is the home of Pat Brunton. It also is a Maple Valley institution. When she and her husband, the late Frederic K. Brunton, purchased the house with its surrounding 67 acres, they did not realize they also were getting a chapter in the history of the valley.

The house was built in 1905 by railroad contractor Olaf Olson, who built the narrow-gauge railway to the Monte Cristo mines and the tunnels through Rogers Pass for Canadian Pacific trains and constructed a tunnel through the Cascades for the Milwaukee Railroad. The walls of the house are solid concrete, a material familiar to Olson, all of it mixed by hand and poured by laborers who lived in tents on the site during construction. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, June 16, 1881

Early photo of Newcastle (near present day Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park) south of Bellevue.

Newcastle 1883

Newcastle, as most of our readers well know, is a coal mining town situated in the mountains, about twenty-two miles from Seattle.

The houses occupied by the miners are small, and as a general thing unpainted; and but little regularity exists in the location of buildings. When the mine was being opened, rude cabins were built wherever room between the stumps could be found, and they are still used, the miner paying a small rent each month for them. The houses built at a later date are much better and more convenient. The cottages occupied by the storekeeper, bookkeeper, superintendent, physician, and some other employees, are neat and comfortable. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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