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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw School District’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 3, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Ivan Gingrich, left, shares a laugh with Bill VanRuff, Bob Schuler, Bill Woodcock, and Jeff Snelling in celebration of the completion of refurbishment of the Black Diamond gymnasium. Gingrich and Schuler, who work for Tahoma School District’s maintenance department, volunteered to refinish the gym floor on their own time. VanRuff, Woodcock, and Snelling are members of Maple Valley Rotary, which donated labor and money to refurbish the gym.

Kids in the City of Black Diamond were so excited about their gym’s reopening, which had been a work in progress since being moved from the Black Diamond Elementary School in 1992, that they hopped on their bikes and made their way to the gym long before the celebration was set to begin on Saturday, June 23. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 2, 1997

By Paul Gottlieb
The Courier-Herald

Black Diamond playground took new shape last week as new playground equipment was installed. (Photo by Paul Gottlieb)

Like weekend warriors, a squad of 20 to 30 Black Diamond residents armed with rakes and shovels descend upon the town’s elementary school playground every Saturday to upgrade the only play area for children—and adults—for miles around.

By July 12, the volunteers and the heavy equipment operators they trail expect to complete a project that will double the size of the existing playground by expanding it into a field owned by Enumclaw School District. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 15, 1911

Quarterly apportionment made to various districts of King County

M.E. Durham, deputy county superintendent, yesterday completed the last quarterly apportionment to the various school districts of the county. The total amount distributed was $580,572.55, of which $314,662.19 was from the state fund and $265,909.86 from the county fund. The apportionment was 7.6 cents per day’s attendance and $75 per teacher employed.

Those districts receiving more than $1,200 were: Seattle, $46,394; Renton, $9,160; Kent, $8,327; Auburn, $7,935; Foster, $4,740; Enumclaw, $4,175; Black Diamond, $4,035; Bothell, $3,918; Oak Lake, $3,805; Issaquah, $3,124; Ravensdale, $2,084; Richmond, $1,989; Kennydale, $1,833; Bellevue, $1,779; Kirkland, $1,700; Newcastle, $1,676; Redmond, $1,601; North Bend, $1,518; Des Moines, $1,520; Fall City, $1,337; Pacific, $1,218.

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 14, 1989

Zach Sullivan and Jennifer Drury earn the Pettersen Award. Photo by Brenda Berube.

Black Diamond Elementary School started off the succession of sixth-grade graduations June 6 with a formal ceremony that included awards and diplomas.

Black Diamond sixth-grade teacher Rich Hubber said the sixth-grade graduation is a spin-off from the old eight-grade graduation, back when graduating from the eighth-grade was as far as most students got.

“It’s part of the tradition of the school,” Hubber said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, May 14, 1997

By Paul Gottlieb
The Courier-Herald

Settling into his new role as King County Executive, Ron Sims visited Black Diamond May 7 as his 120-day “Community Outreach” tour of cities and communities draws to a close.

Sims met with city administrator Rick Luther and city councilman Mario Sorci in the city council chambers, promising to look into making it easier for Black Diamond to obtain more water as the city grows. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 25, 2015

By Kathleen Kear

Towards the end of 2014 concerns ran high as to whether the Black Diamond Gym would stay opened or close, however, continued negotiations between the city and Black Diamond Community Center led to a resolution that has put a smile on everyone’s face once again. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, February 1, 1999

Officials say no, but residents appeal for signal on busy SR-169

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Students from Black Diamond Elementary School cross busy Highway 169 at Baker Street after school Friday. Highway planners propose a yellow flashing light for use only when school children are coming and going. But residents insist traffic has grown to the point that a stoplight is needed for pedestrian safety. (Marcus R. Donner/Journal)

BLACK DIAMOND — Lorianne Taff rarely allows her 10-year-old son to cross State Route 169 by himself to get candy at the Cenex station.

Only recently did she give her 13-year-old son, a junior high student, permission to negotiate the usually busy two-lane highway that bisects this small rural town.

As a mother, a Black Diamond resident, and an Enumclaw School Board member, Taff worries about the highway and its growing traffic. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 1991

By Jackie Zils

Black Diamond’s elementary school may be regarded as a “little brother” in its school system (Enumclaw), but it more than holds its own with larger schools. — VOICE photo.

Being a small school brings big returns to Black Diamond Elementary.

Often regarded as a sort of “little brother” to the rest of the Enumclaw School District, Black Diamond may be reaping the most benefits.

Students have more access to computers and library resources than their counterparts in the rest of the district. Curriculum materials aren’t spread as thin among the teaching staff. Administrative and support staff have fewer people to deal with because of Black Diamond’s smaller population. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1925

Prosperous town on Naches Pass Highway surrounded by rich agricultural, timber, and mineral lands, is boasting of rapid development

New mill of the White River Lumber Company on the White River, three miles from Enumclaw.

One of the earliest settlements in that part of the state and the only place of that name in the United States, Enumclaw, forty miles southeast of Seattle, is one of the biggest little towns in the West.

Early history and distinctive name, however, are not Enumclaw’s only claims for attention. Thought its early growth was slow, Enumclaw today is counted one of the most prosperous towns in the Puget Sound region. Rich agricultural land, timber, and mineral surround it. It is on the Naches Pass highway, the most direct route between Seattle and the west entrance to Mount Rainier Nation Park. It is the gateway to unlimited scenic attractions, fishing, and hunting grounds. Backup up against the Cascade foothills, Enumclaw is within two hours’ drive of perpetual snow on one side and the waters of Puget Sound on the other. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, November 13, 1996

By Casey Olson
The Courier-Herald

No video tape in the world could hold the rich history of the Black Diamond community.

There is just too much of it.

But give Bob Eaton and Micki Ryan a lot of credit. The pair is undertaking the mission impossible and attempting to put together the first-ever video history of the history-rich town.

They’ve found the task fascinating and time consuming.

The coal mining industry brought immigrants from all around the world to the tiny hamlet nestled in the Cascade foothills during the late 1800s and early 1900s, turning the quiet community into a bustling city. Italians, Greeks, Chinese, Germans, Hungarians, and Irish were blended together every day, a clash of cultures that helped form the modern day community of Black Diamond. (more…)

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