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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw School District’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 25, 2015

By Kathleen Kear

Towards the end of 2014 concerns ran high as to whether the Black Diamond Gym would stay opened or close, however, continued negotiations between the city and Black Diamond Community Center led to a resolution that has put a smile on everyone’s face once again. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, February 1, 1999

Officials say no, but residents appeal for signal on busy SR-169

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Students from Black Diamond Elementary School cross busy Highway 169 at Baker Street after school Friday. Highway planners propose a yellow flashing light for use only when school children are coming and going. But residents insist traffic has grown to the point that a stoplight is needed for pedestrian safety. (Marcus R. Donner/Journal)

BLACK DIAMOND — Lorianne Taff rarely allows her 10-year-old son to cross State Route 169 by himself to get candy at the Cenex station.

Only recently did she give her 13-year-old son, a junior high student, permission to negotiate the usually busy two-lane highway that bisects this small rural town.

As a mother, a Black Diamond resident, and an Enumclaw School Board member, Taff worries about the highway and its growing traffic. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 1991

By Jackie Zils

Black Diamond’s elementary school may be regarded as a “little brother” in its school system (Enumclaw), but it more than holds its own with larger schools. — VOICE photo.

Being a small school brings big returns to Black Diamond Elementary.

Often regarded as a sort of “little brother” to the rest of the Enumclaw School District, Black Diamond may be reaping the most benefits.

Students have more access to computers and library resources than their counterparts in the rest of the district. Curriculum materials aren’t spread as thin among the teaching staff. Administrative and support staff have fewer people to deal with because of Black Diamond’s smaller population. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1925

Prosperous town on Naches Pass Highway surrounded by rich agricultural, timber, and mineral lands, is boasting of rapid development

New mill of the White River Lumber Company on the White River, three miles from Enumclaw.

One of the earliest settlements in that part of the state and the only place of that name in the United States, Enumclaw, forty miles southeast of Seattle, is one of the biggest little towns in the West.

Early history and distinctive name, however, are not Enumclaw’s only claims for attention. Thought its early growth was slow, Enumclaw today is counted one of the most prosperous towns in the Puget Sound region. Rich agricultural land, timber, and mineral surround it. It is on the Naches Pass highway, the most direct route between Seattle and the west entrance to Mount Rainier Nation Park. It is the gateway to unlimited scenic attractions, fishing, and hunting grounds. Backup up against the Cascade foothills, Enumclaw is within two hours’ drive of perpetual snow on one side and the waters of Puget Sound on the other. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, November 13, 1996

By Casey Olson
The Courier-Herald

No video tape in the world could hold the rich history of the Black Diamond community.

There is just too much of it.

But give Bob Eaton and Micki Ryan a lot of credit. The pair is undertaking the mission impossible and attempting to put together the first-ever video history of the history-rich town.

They’ve found the task fascinating and time consuming.

The coal mining industry brought immigrants from all around the world to the tiny hamlet nestled in the Cascade foothills during the late 1800s and early 1900s, turning the quiet community into a bustling city. Italians, Greeks, Chinese, Germans, Hungarians, and Irish were blended together every day, a clash of cultures that helped form the modern day community of Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 28, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

Planning has begun to offer Black Diamond, and especially its children and young people, a traditional Labor Days celebration. At a well-attended first meeting last week, eighteen interested persons began to draw the plans that will make the celebration possible.

Sid Bergestrom and Steve (Home Smith) Gustin are acting as temporary co-chairmen. Sue Capponi will be in charge of the Finance Committee which involves soliciting donations for prizes, etc. Chuck Capponi will handle the Soap Box Derby, George and Dianne Wilson will do the promotions.

There was a general consensus among those attending that the event was mainly intended to be for Black Diamond and the smaller Valley cities rather than for large numbers of Seattle area people who unfortunately have viewed it as opportunity to come into this area to drink and “tear up the town.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 17, 1968

A monster has reared its ugly head in this community. It is not particular whom it chooses for its victims. Its bite has crippled, maimed, and even killed. It prefers to prey on youth, but no one is immune from its grasp. Its tentacles are comprised of alcohol, glue, and narcotics. They have reached out to kill one Enumclaw youth and reduce another to a living death.

A number of people are trying to find the reasons why it is allowed to flourish here. But one thing is certain to those concerned citizens. It is here and something must be done to rid the community of its cause and effect.

Earl and Isabelle Sherwood, whose 16 year-old son died on July 9 of this year from what a King County coroner’s jury termed “consuming excessive amounts at liquor furnished by person or persons unknown,” want to do what they can to save other parents the grief they have had to bear. (more…)

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