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Posts Tagged ‘taverns’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 18, 1980

An arson fire completely gutted the Four Corners Tavern during early morning hours on June 10.

An arson fire completely gutted the Four Corners Tavern during early morning hours on June 10.

The Four Comers Tavern, 26818 Maple Valley-Black Diamond Road, was totally destroyed in an arson fire last week.

Engine companies from Fire District 43, 37, and 44 responded to the four-alarm fire which began about 2:30 a.m. on Tuesday, June 10. About 50 firemen fought the blaze for nearly an hour and a half before getting it under control. Highway 169 was closed by police until 5:30 in the morning to aid the firefighters.

The King County Fire Investigation Unit has determined that the fire had multiple points of origin and was a definite arson. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 25, 1979

This picture, taken during the fire which destroyed the old clubhouse at the Lake Wilderness Golf Course, shows firemen battling the blaze. The upper story has already burned down, but the two chimney stacks are still standing. Before it was over, the whole building, for all practical purposes, was completely destroyed, says Ray Colman, owner. (Photo courtesy Pat Simone.)

This picture, taken during the fire which destroyed the old clubhouse at the Lake Wilderness Golf Course, shows firemen battling the blaze. The upper story has already burned down, but the two chimney stacks are still standing. Before it was over, the whole building, for all practical purposes, was completely destroyed, says Ray Colman, owner. (Photo courtesy Pat Simone.)

The old clubhouse at the Lake Wilderness Golf Course was destroyed in a spectacular fire on Sunday, April 8.

According to Ray Colman, owner of the well-known Maple Valley landmark, the fire started when two young boys set papers on fire inside the building. They were spotted leaving the building and were apprehended later when they returned to view the blaze.

The clubhouse dates back to 1929, Colman says. “It was where the Chamber of Commerce held their first meetings. The Lions Club also held their first meetings there, and for many years it was a social center for numerous other parties and groups in the area.”

The building was originally constructed by Kain Gaffney and Ed Long. They started out by serving chicken dinners there. Gaffney and Long at one time also owned the Lake Wilderness Golf Course and later Gaffney’s Resort on the lake. They were both well-known musicians in the area. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, April 1977

By Harry Rossi & Norma Gumser

Pacific Coast Co. Hotel

The 67-room Pacific Coast Co. Hotel was across the street from the depot/museum, where the Eagles are today.

Harry Rossi was ten years old or thereabouts [ca. 1930], and it was his chore after school to pick up the trimmings from the Pacific Coast Hotel. It made good food for the hogs.

He crossed the street at the depot with his load, down the wooden sidewalk going home. At the tavern, there were these three young men loafing out in front. One of them tripped Harry and his can of slop spilled all over the sidewalk. The young men roared with laughter and Harry scrambled to pick up the pieces.

He hurried home, down the broad sidewalk, past the garage, past the dry goods store, the meat market, and the bakery, and down the hill to home. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 7, 1977

Cedar River turned big, brown, and ugly again on December 2nd and 3rd this year on the exact anniversary of the 1975 major flood. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, November 20, 1966

By Rod Cardwell

Picturesque Maple Valley viewed from Echo Lake Cutoff to Snoqualmie Pass Highway; Boeing expansion spells rapid growth for Cedar River area. – Photos by TNT’s Bob Rudsit.

Picturesque Maple Valley viewed from Echo Lake Cutoff to Snoqualmie Pass Highway; Boeing expansion spells rapid growth for Cedar River area. – Photos by TNT’s Bob Rudsit.

MAPLE VALLEY, King County — Born 70 years ago in Italy, an ex-barber named Joe Mezzavilla still makes wine for his own table and is quite particular and uses only the best grapes from California.

And it is obviously a good medicine because he is a fine figure of a man, tall and erect … and with a full head of Latin-dark hair streaked with distinguished gray.

He has no use for most store-bought wines. In the accent of his native Venice, he explains, “I’m a make mine with a no sugar, no fortified stuff.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 23, 2014

By Bill Kombol

This May 1968 photo of the Morganville Tavern comes courtesy of the King County Assessor’s archived collection.

This May 1968 photo of the Morganville Tavern comes courtesy of the King County Assessor’s archived collection.

Morganville is a section of Black Diamond founded by striking coal miners in the early 1920s. The building shown here was operated for several decades as the Morganville Tavern with its famous silver dollar bar.

It became a raucous gathering place for bikers, farmers, and politicians after Rick King acquired it, added musical entertainment, and ramped up sales to over 350 kegs of beer per month. (more…)

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