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Posts Tagged ‘taverns’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 12, 1986

By Eulalia Tollefson

Dan Palmer, shown with his dog, Puppu, singing ‘Black Diamond Mines.’

Dan Palmer, shown with his dog, Puppu, singing ‘Black Diamond Mines.’

Dan Palmer’s distinctive style of easy listenin’ folk music and a catchy, nostalgic song called “Black Diamond Mines” have earned exposure on radio KEZX—exposure Palmer hopes will draw the interest of music scouts.

Palmer and his trademark—a devoted 15-year-old pooch named Puppu—are familiar to area folk who frequent local restaurants, taverns, and night spots.

Everywhere from Boots Tavern, the Black Diamond Saloon, and the Amber Inn to the Pick and Shovel in Wilkeson, Palmer draws crowds with a variety of folk music.

From old time blues to bluegrass he entertains with old favorites and originals like “Black Diamond Mines,” a song he wrote in honor of Black Diamond’s 100th birthday celebration.

The ballad was born of Palmer’s fascination for the town’s coal mining history. Much of it is a tribute to Dooda Vernarelli, a colorful town character much loved by old and young alike. (more…)

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Originally published in Valley Living, October 9, 1987

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

“Every time an old house goes, a part of me goes with it,” says Dan Palmer, shuffling through a stack of photographs of historic landmarks scattered over the Valley.

“I can take it when nature takes them, but when it’s the bulldozers…,” Palmer’s voice softens in regret.

Palmer, a folk musician and craftsman by trade, really started getting serious about Valley history when he moved to Black Diamond. And as his interest grew, he started accumulating articles and books on the area’s roots and mounting his own collection of photographs of buildings still standing and the overgrown remnants of a boisterous coal mining past. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2013

By Ken Jensen

A business sign means more than just hanging out the proverbial “shingle.” There’s always a story.

Case in point. On the cover we find the KoernersJohn and Walt—posing in front of their drug store in 1925. One of the signs on the building is for United Cigar Stores Co.

Turns out that cigar franchise was a real boon for the Koerners—and for Black Diamond, too—as John Koerner reported in the September 1922 Pacific Coast Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 8, 1973

Two more queen candidates have joined the race to see who will reign over the Black Diamond Labor Day celebration, according to Queen Committee Chairwoman Muriel Wing.

Miss Pam Nervenud of 101 Pines in Kent and Rhonda Russell of Maple Valley join candidates Kathy Storey and Kari Sawyer.

The girls have until August 24th to pile up sales of Black Diamond Booster Buttons. The best saleswoman is selected queen. Button proceeds go towards financing the celebration. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, July 29, 1987

Horseshoe pitching is more than just a picnic folly for the Heines

Elwood and Ken are teammates on the Green River Tavern team.

Elwood and Ken are teammates on the Green River Tavern team.

Meet Elwood and Kenneth Heine, the “shoes brothers.”

The Heines pitch horseshoes with passion and precision. They’ve flung the weighty good-luck pieces with South King County’s best for more than a decade. In the horseshoe pits, the Heines make their own luck.

For Elwood and Ken, horseshoe pitching is more than a picnic folly. It’s an art, a rhythmic exercise with a rustic beat—the thud of the shoe in the sand, its clink against the metal stake. Nearly every other horseshoe they loft snuggles perfectly around its target.

Close does count in horseshoes—a point is awarded if the shoe is within six inches of the stake—but for the Heines, only a “ringer” will do. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 18, 1980

An arson fire completely gutted the Four Corners Tavern during early morning hours on June 10.

An arson fire completely gutted the Four Corners Tavern during early morning hours on June 10.

The Four Comers Tavern, 26818 Maple Valley-Black Diamond Road, was totally destroyed in an arson fire last week.

Engine companies from Fire District 43, 37, and 44 responded to the four-alarm fire which began about 2:30 a.m. on Tuesday, June 10. About 50 firemen fought the blaze for nearly an hour and a half before getting it under control. Highway 169 was closed by police until 5:30 in the morning to aid the firefighters.

The King County Fire Investigation Unit has determined that the fire had multiple points of origin and was a definite arson. (more…)

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