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Posts Tagged ‘taverns’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 12, 1987

The Black Diamond city council decided in its March 5 regular meeting to allow Black Diamond owner Bill Hutchison to have only 12 days of live music a year in his establishment. The decision was seen as a compromise between Hutchison’s request for a full-time cabaret license and nearby residents’ request that the license be entirely denied. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 20, 2007

The former railroad depot, built in 1886, in Black Diamond now houses the Historical Society Museum. Down Railroad Avenue the current book store is visible. It has also been King’s Tavern. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Featured speaker at the Maple Valley Reunion, Sunday, Feb. 25th, will be Mayor Howard Botts of Black Diamond. The 1 p.m. program at the Grange Hall on Highway 169 at 216th is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Mayor Botts, who was born and raised in Black Diamond, will relate the histories of the two towns and how they have been connected over the years by the highway, the railroad, once upon a time, as well as other similarities. He’ll also discuss, “what is coming down the road; hopefully, new homes and new businesses.”

He said, “It is always interesting to talk about my home town.” Botts has served as mayor for 24 years and before that served several terms on the City Council in the 1960s and then during the 1970s, he was a member of the Planning Community. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, February 12, 1987

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

Three ordinances and a large water bill topped a brief Black Diamond city council meeting February 5.

The water bill in question belongs to William Hutchinson, owner of the Black Diamond Saloon. His one-month water usage totaled 7,245 cubic feet, or more than 54,000 gallons of water.

“I just don’t see how I could have used that much water in a month,” Hutchinson said. “I did have a couple urinals that were running, but I backed them off a bit.”

At the meeting, Hutchinson quipped that the city’s new 500,000 gallon water reservoir be built much larger. “I’m gonna use it all up in about 10 months,” he said, laughing. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Getting ready to celebrate her 100th birthday is Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney (left). Also pictured with Keeney is son, Joe Androsko (center), and husband, Lee (right).

Looking forward to celebrating her first century of life, former Black Diamond resident Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney has plenty of tales to share about growing up in Black Diamond.

Born on February 4, 1907, to father, Joe Favro (a Black Diamond coal miner), and mother, Mary (a stay-at-home mom), Keeney grew up to become one of thirteen Black Diamond High School graduates in the class of 1926. Soon after graduation, she went to work at the Black Diamond Bakery. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, January 28, 1994

Around the Valley by Mary Swift

The yeast he could do—Doug Weiding never figured on becoming a baker

Doug Weiding in a ‘special’ booth at the Black Diamond Bakery. Valley Daily News photo by Garry Kissel.

Weiding, a former food broker salesman, was actually in the market for a tavern.

Then the tavern deal fell through and the opportunity to buy the historic Black Diamond Bakery rose before him, an opportunity as delicious as sweet dough in a warm oven.

The year was 1985.

Weiding tied on an apron and became baker. (more…)

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Originally published in the News Journal, January 23, 1980

Story and photos by Bruce Rommel

Black Diamond sits nestled in the western foothills of the Cascades.

Once hundreds of men worked the strip mines, producing coal, the “black diamond” which powered the railroads, fueled industry, and heated our homes.

Walking the quiet streets of Black Diamond today, one finds only the reminders of those days when this community was a booming company town.

Nestled in the western foothills of the Cascades, Black Diamond and nearby Franklin once boasted a population of more than 5,000. All that remains of Franklin today are a few house foundations scattered along hillsides. And in 1979 Black Diamond is a town with about 1,100 residents, about 50 less citizens than a decade ago. (more…)

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