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Posts Tagged ‘taverns’

Originally published in the Maple Valley Reporter, July 6, 2012

By TJ Martinell

Black Diamond miners ride the car down into the mine. The car was lowered by a cable from the surface. The car was designed to stop if the cable was severed to prevent it from crashing.

A typical “day at the office” for the 820 or so men who worked in Mine 11 in Black Diamond at the turn of the century involved darkness, potential disasters and long hours of hard work thousands of feet beneath the surface.

The morning shifts started at 7:30 a.m. Work shifts ranged from eight to 10 hours, six days a week.

As Miners Day—which is set for this weekend—approached Don Mason and Don Malgarini of the Black Diamond Historical Society reflected on what the average day was like for a coal miner.

“There wasn’t a lot of office jobs,” Mason said. “They worked their butts off.” (more…)

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After it makes an emergency landing on Highway 169

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, June 30, 1994

By Cheryl Murfin
Valley Daily News

Cessna sits next to the Boots Tavern in Black Diamond after it made a 'miracle' landing on Highway 169. (Valley Daily News photo by Marcus R. Donner)

Cessna sits next to the Boots Tavern in Black Diamond after it made a ‘miracle’ landing on Highway 169. (Valley Daily News photo by Marcus R. Donner)

BLACK DIAMOND — Jerry Everett expects to see disabled vehicles when he pulls into his repair shop each morning. But he expects them to be automobiles, not airplanes.

Wednesday morning, he arrived to find a single-engine plane parked in his lot. It had been pushed to the side of the building by the plane’s pilot, assisted by patrons of a tavern next door, after an emergency landing on Highway 169 near Southeast 311th Street.

According to Black Diamond Police Lt. Kevin Esping, the Cessna 175’s pilot maneuvered around numerous utility lines to land on the narrow, two-lane road about 10 p.m. Tuesday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Reporter, May 20, 2011

By TJ Martinell

The grave of Alice Gertrude Johnson in the Franklin Cemetery. The date of birth and death read: January 1, 1902 – January 7, 1902. TJ Martinell, The Reporter

When I think of a ghost town, a tableau of the iconic “High Noon” spaghetti-western comes into mind. It is a row of ramshackle wooden buildings that form two lines like opposing armies in a battle. There is the requisite saloon door dangling on one hinge, while a ball of tumbleweed sweeps through the dry and barren street. Aside from a gust of wind, bringing in dust devils and a hot dry breeze, the environment has an eerie silence to it.

As I explored the area near Green River with Dan Hutson, a member of the Black Diamond Historical Society, where the town of Franklin once was, I perceived that, as a ghost town, it has none of these qualities. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, April 18, 1990

By Gail Dallas
Staff Home Economist

Visitors who open up Destination Washington, the slick state tourism publication issued in time for summer’s Goodwill Games, will quickly find themselves eyeing a glossy photo of the Black Diamond Dinner House, one of a dozen dining spots featured in the “On the Town” guide to distinctive Northwest cuisine.

It’s a new role for the historic landmark.

The white clapboard building was built at the turn of the century, and used first as a feed store, according to new owner George Donahue, who purchased the restaurant in August. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 5, 1995

What the hell has happened to Black Diamond’s business district?

Last Saturday afternoon, my mother asked me to stop by the bakery for a loaf of date-nut bread but, owing to the new buildings and the crowd of big-city retirees and Yuppies, I could hardly find the place.

The two blocks of South Railroad Avenue were so congested with traffic and pedestrians it was difficult to find a parking place.

Of course, the Black Diamond bakery has attracted tourists ever since it opened early in the century, but there’s never been so many Seattle and Bellevue folks seeking a little country serenity—a goal that quickly evaporates in such a crowd. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 12, 1987

The Black Diamond city council decided in its March 5 regular meeting to allow Black Diamond owner Bill Hutchison to have only 12 days of live music a year in his establishment. The decision was seen as a compromise between Hutchison’s request for a full-time cabaret license and nearby residents’ request that the license be entirely denied. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 20, 2007

The former railroad depot, built in 1886, in Black Diamond now houses the Historical Society Museum. Down Railroad Avenue the current book store is visible. It has also been King’s Tavern. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Featured speaker at the Maple Valley Reunion, Sunday, Feb. 25th, will be Mayor Howard Botts of Black Diamond. The 1 p.m. program at the Grange Hall on Highway 169 at 216th is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Mayor Botts, who was born and raised in Black Diamond, will relate the histories of the two towns and how they have been connected over the years by the highway, the railroad, once upon a time, as well as other similarities. He’ll also discuss, “what is coming down the road; hopefully, new homes and new businesses.”

He said, “It is always interesting to talk about my home town.” Botts has served as mayor for 24 years and before that served several terms on the City Council in the 1960s and then during the 1970s, he was a member of the Planning Community. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, February 12, 1987

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

Three ordinances and a large water bill topped a brief Black Diamond city council meeting February 5.

The water bill in question belongs to William Hutchinson, owner of the Black Diamond Saloon. His one-month water usage totaled 7,245 cubic feet, or more than 54,000 gallons of water.

“I just don’t see how I could have used that much water in a month,” Hutchinson said. “I did have a couple urinals that were running, but I backed them off a bit.”

At the meeting, Hutchinson quipped that the city’s new 500,000 gallon water reservoir be built much larger. “I’m gonna use it all up in about 10 months,” he said, laughing. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Getting ready to celebrate her 100th birthday is Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney (left). Also pictured with Keeney is son, Joe Androsko (center), and husband, Lee (right).

Looking forward to celebrating her first century of life, former Black Diamond resident Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney has plenty of tales to share about growing up in Black Diamond.

Born on February 4, 1907, to father, Joe Favro (a Black Diamond coal miner), and mother, Mary (a stay-at-home mom), Keeney grew up to become one of thirteen Black Diamond High School graduates in the class of 1926. Soon after graduation, she went to work at the Black Diamond Bakery. (more…)

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