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Archive for the ‘Railroads’ Category

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 23, 1978

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

A mini-park right in “downtown” Maple Valley, so to speak, is the current goal of three community organizations—the Maple Valley Lions’ Club, the Plant and Wish Garden Club, and the Maple Valley Historical Society.

The Lions are interested in bringing their bus shelter and reader board project to a close. About 25 more hours of work are needed, reports Johnny Markus of Ravensdale, to place a roof over the reader board to protect the lighting, build storage space for the reader board letters, do some remaining concrete work, and wire in the lights.

The historical group is eyeing the abandoned residence on the site, owned by Burlington Railroad. It would make an ideal place, members believe, for a museum.

The garden club is hard at work developing the mini-park itself on the triangular lot between the Maple Valley-Hobart Road and Highway 169.

Already plastic and chips have been laid on a section of the park and the ground smoothed for more plastic and chips. Robert Sloboden, James Daoust, Robert Smith, and Joe Wicks helped their garden club wives with this phase of the work.

The Slobodens’ sons also assisted. The gardeners especially thank Joe Wicks for the use of his back-hoe, the county for the chips, and those who started the mini-park ball rolling with monetary contributions.

The latter includes, so far, Gordon Gaub of the Maple Valley Food Center ($20) and the Maple Valley Lions Club ($50).

The garden club ladies are asking for more donations and are planning on planting trees and shrubs as soon as the weather permits.

The whole community is welcome to participate in the project.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952

Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952The view of Maple Valley in autumn depicted on Page 1 of this Magazine Section appealed to Parker McAllister, Times staff artist, as most appropriate for inclusion in his series of rural scenes in the Puget Sound country. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 18, 1895

The slope is stopped up

Franklin mines continue to be the scene of excitement—every effort was made to rescue the four unfortunate men without avail

The bodies of the four men known to have perished in the slope fire yesterday at the Franklin coal mines have not been recovered and the fire has not yet been extinguished, although the flames have been got under control and the slope closed up with timbers, sand, and dirt.

Of the men dead, full mention of whom was made in the 5 o’clock edition of last evening’s Times, John Glover was a white man and George W. Smalley, John Adams, and James Stafford were colored men, Smalley leaving a wife and child and Adams and Stafford being single men. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1895

Phil Early and another employee named Gibson so badly burned and injured that they died today—the cause of the explosion is not known

Tombstone of Romulous Monroe Gibson, who died in an boiler explosion at Franklin on October 3, 1895.

Tombstone of Romulous Monroe Gibson, who died in an boiler explosion at Franklin on October 3, 1895.

The Franklin mines have been the scene of another unfortunate accident by which two men lost their lives. Yesterday morning one of the boilers in a battery located at the edge of Green River, far below the mine proper, exploded, and so badly burned and injured Phil Early and a man named [Romulous Monroe] Gibson, employees, that they died today from the effects. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1919

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road fronting the building is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road in the foreground is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

After a fight with the Board of County Commissioners that has lasted twelve years, the residents of Bartram Junction, three miles northeast of Renton on the Newcastle branch of the Pacific Coast Railroad, are to have a road outlet to the highways of the county.

The county board yesterday received from the State Public Service Commission permission to construct a temporary grade crossing over the railroad and Commissioner Thomas Dobson of the North District said today that one-half of the one-mile road from the Newcastle highway to Bartram will he constructed this year and that it will be finished next spring at an approximate cost of $2,500. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 26, 1893

Thomas Griffiths, a Welshman, who has been working for Thomas Price on a ranch on the Cedar River, was cut in two by a coal train near Eddyville station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, between 12 and 1 o’clock yesterday morning. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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