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Archive for the ‘Railroads’ Category

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 4, 1955

Engineer dies in rail crash

One trainman was killed, and four others were injured in a collision of two Northern Pacific Railway freight trains about 11:15 o’clock this forenoon in Renton.

The dead man was identified tentatively by coroner’s deputies as W.C. Armstrong, Auburn, engineer. Armstrong and another trainman were trapped in the cab of a steam engine. The second man’s identity was not learned immediately. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 27, 1906

Georgetown controversy likely to be renewed with Columbia & Puget Sound takes advantage of franchise

Roads insist upon overhead crossing to do away with danger of injury through collision with trains

The controversy between the Northern Pacific and the town of Georgetown may be repeated when the Columbia & Puget Sound attempts to double-track its line between Seattle and Black River Junction. The Columbia & Puget Sound must lay a second track across Rainier Avenue and has a franchise, granted by the county commissioners prior to the incorporation of Georgetown, authorizing the work.

As soon as the Pacific Coast Company, which owns the Columbia & Puget Sound, completes estimates of cost, the coal road will begin laying tracks. The system will act under its franchise rights, but there may follow protests from Georgetown. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 16, 1911

With price of $50 to murder fellowman, Italian’s hand flutters and he temporizes with intended victim

Above are shown the Vella brothers and below is a picture of Cosenza, whom the brothers hired Arena to kill.

Two agree to split purse to be paid

Four men now in jail while sheriff’s deputies have narrow escape from engaging in death duel

Fifty dollars is the price of a human life, disposed with Camorra-like methods, in the county of King, according to the remarkable disclosures of Joe Cosenza, a coal miner whose life was spared by the weakening of the hired assassin.

In the arrest of the alleged plotters, in a mining hamlet shack at Franklin, Deputy Sheriff Scott Malone and City Detective Joe Bianchi had the closest calls of their lives early this morning, for Thomas Vella, Italian, and the two officers stood with revolvers leveled at one another for a minute, each trying to force the other to back down. The Italian’s nerve finally failed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 11, 1916

Lake trip ideal for motorists

Magnificent scenery found on tour to White Sulphur Spring—road passes along Cedar River Gorge

Abundant sport waits fishermen’s coming

Beauty spots on scenic drive. Two river canyons, each leading back into the Cascades, are followed on the tour presented by The Times today, terminating at Lake Wilderness, twenty-nine miles distant from the city. The colored illustration shows The Times pathfinder car, the Hupmobile, as it arrived at the lake shore. Below, in the accompanying photograph, is a view of the Green River canyon, shortly after the car had crossed the hill from Black Diamond.

Less than thirty miles from Seattle, at the end of a pathway which leads through ever-changing scenery, along the magnificent Cedar River gorge and up into the mining section of King County, lies Lake Wilderness, towards which The Times pathfinder car, a Hupmobile, blazed the trail for the second of the 1916 series of tours and the twenty-sixth in the grand total thus far logged by this newspaper.

The car, kindly furnished by Mr. Louis P. Schaeffer of the William T. Patten Motor Company, and driven by D.P. Dean, left The Times Building at Second Avenue and Union Street shortly after 9 o’clock and was at Lake Wilderness in ample time to permit an hour’s fishing in the lake before noon as an appetizer.

During the afternoon, the return was made by way of Black Diamond and Auburn, a slightly longer route but well worth the extra effort. In addition to providing variety to the trip, the alternate highway descended into a country of splendid roads and fascinating scenery, joining the Pacific Highway thence into Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 4, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Welsh descendant Joseph J. Thomas, 9, was laid to rest in the Black Diamond Cemetery in 1890 after being killed by a coal train.

Steeped in a rich heritage of life centered on coal mining, Black Diamond, which was the third largest city in the state of Washington at one time, could also boast of the many European immigrants settling in and around the bustling town.

One of the countries represented in the area was Wales. Between 1882 and 1885 a whole town of Welsh families from California moved to Washington bringing with them not only their rich Welsh inheritance, but also the name of their town—Black Diamond (known at times in California during that time period as Nortonville and today as Pittsburgh).

Along with their rich heritage, the families brought with them their mining tools and equipment in addition to their furnishings. Many of these items will be on view at the Black Diamond Museum during their 5th annual Welsh Heritage Day celebration on Saturday, June 7. (more…)

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Originally published in The News Tribune, May 18, 1994

Coal town energizes student imagination

By Jami Leabow Farkas
The News Tribune

Not much sits now on the land off Southeast Green River Gorge Road near Black Diamond. It’s barren, save for huge trees and a few headstones that give clues to the people who inhabited the once-thriving coal mining settlement of Franklin.

But with the ongoing efforts of eighth-grade students at Cedar Heights Junior High School in Kent, that all could change by the turn of the century. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 6, 1917

Pacific States Lumber Company wants to purchase material that will take years to log

That an offer will be made to the city of Seattle to purchase about 100,000,000 feet of standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, at a price of approximately $1,000,000, has been known to various city officials for several days, as a part of the general plan of the Pacific States Lumber Company to begin logging operations that will extend over a period of several years. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 23, 1911

Government demonstration coach on way to Sound to pass three days more

Mine rescue car in Black Diamond.

Government Mine Rescue Car No. 5 will arrive in Seattle May 1 and will be at the fire station of the University of Washington for three days, according to an announcement made yesterday by the mine bureau officials in charge of the car.

The car and its crew are now at Bayne. April 28 it will be at Ravensdale, and from there will proceed to Tacoma. Other dates for the car follow:

Renton, May 5; Issaquah, May 6; Newcastle, May 8; Taylor, May 9; Black Diamond and Franklin, May 12 to 14.

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 21, 1993

By J.C. Long
The Courier-Herald

The aroma of fresh-baked bread wafting from the Black Diamond Bakery has drawn many loaf lovers to the city and its surrounding areas.

Unfortunately, the bakery lies on the west side of town and can’t be seen from Highway 169. In the past, that’s been a problem for first-time visitors, but soon, even the olfactory impaired will have no problem finding the bakery or any other of the city’s landmark businesses. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 15, 1926

One of the institutions in Carbonado of which the camp is justly proud is the splendid Union Sunday School which recently passed the 100 mark in its membership. Mrs. J.W.L. Kaufman is the efficient superintendent of the Sunday School. She is assisted by a loyal corps of teachers and officers, all of whom are striving to make the organization even greater and better than it now is.

The Sunday School is undenominational, and it is unique in that all denominations and creeds represented are working in perfect harmony for the upbuilding of the religious and moral life of the community. (more…)

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