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Archive for the ‘Railroads’ Category

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2007

Bud and Ora Mable (Babe) relax in the living room of their remodeled cabin they purchased in Orchard Grove 61 years ago. Photo by Barbara Nilson.

In 1946 Babe Bodvin was traveling down Dorre Don Way visiting a friend of her mother’s when she spotted a two-room cabin for sale. It was owned by a doctor who had built it in 1936. She went home to Seattle to ask her husband, Bud, if they could buy it at $850 for an acre of ground and the cabin. He said yes and 61 years later they’re still there.

They celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary in April. Bud said they were married in her folk’s home right where the Space Needle is today. Her folks, Charles and Capitoly Werl, later moved to Hobart in the 1940s.

Bud said, “All there was to the cabin was a kitchen and the room that is now their living room, nothing else; no ceilings, no running water, an outhouse, we used the fireplace for heat.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2007

Photo taken approximately 1935. Standing in front of house (23360 Dorre Don Way) built by Gus and Rachael on property bought from Uncle John. They purchased about 15 acres of the land that was not platted on the east side of the road. From the left, back row: William Bradford, Gus Christy; left in front row: Mary (Daniels) Bradford, Rosalie Christy, William Christy, and Rachael (Bradford) Christy. Photo loaned by Marla Young.

Thanks to Sandy Faul and Marla Young for their responses to the request in the spring Bugle for information on Dorre Don and Orchard Grove.

Marla Young e-mailed, “l saw the article in The Bugle requesting information about Dorre Don and Orchard Grove. My family lived on both the Dorre Don portion of the road and Orchard Grove for many years.

“My Great Uncle John Daniels owned all of the land now known as Orchard Grove and approximately 40 acres on the other side of the railroad. In 1919 he subdivided the land between the road and river into lots and called it Orchard Grove. Apparently, there was a remnant orchard on part of the land when he purchased the property.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 3, 1925

This is Supt. Simon Ash’s fiery steed, Flyer. It and its fellows hauled the coal trips in the mines of Western Washington before electric haulage came in.

Engineer-fireman Norman Stevenson and conductor-brakeman-flagman-switchman Tom Dodd do, or would, take turns lifting her back on the track when, as, and if she hopped off, they’re that strong and determined.

The Flyer was cold for years until she was fired up recently for yard duty to take the place of a storage-battery locomotive that went inside on development work. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 28, 1947

Shell Oil Company seismograph crew working in Enumclaw area

Shell Oil Company leasing land in area north and northwest of Enumclaw preparatory to drilling for oil; expect real test of oil possibilities in area if Shell Company drills

Late Wednesday the Shell Oil Company, Inc., issued a press release in which they announced the company had acquired considerable acreage in the Black Diamond area from the Pacific Coast Company, Northern Pacific, and other large land holders. They also stated that drilling would start in a few days with the Crissman Drilling Company engaged to do the drilling. This is the first try for oil that the Shell Oil Company has made in the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 27, 1925

These handsome gentlemen run the stores. From left to right, upper row, they are C.T. Paulson of Carbonado, H.W. Doust of Newcastle, Malcolm McPhee, purchasing agent; lower row, L.W. Foreman of Burnett, H.M. McDowell of Black Diamond, and E.F. De Grandpre, Manager of Miscellaneous Operations. This picture shows them working hard at a business meeting.

Mr. McPhee buys the goods, the store managers sell them, and Mr. De Grandpre gets all the money. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, January 1995

Can you guess where and when this picture was taken?

This photograph was taken in the early 1940s by Chester Gibbon. He drove in from the Maple Valley highway on the Pipeline Road and went to the edge of the hill a little west of the point where Highway 18 now drops down into the valley.

In the foreground is Bain Road, and the Vickery and Perry homes and outbuildings. The PC [Pacific Coast] and Milwaukee trestles are at right. In the center of the picture can be seen the old grade school and the gym.

In the middle at left is the false front of the Maple Valley Tavern. An old building that served as the post office and residence of Postmistress Miriam Mahaffey is just below the school.

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2007

Story and photos by Barbara Nilson

Paul Bartholomew and his daughter, Karen Lindquist, stand in front of the foundation for the press factory that made clay pipe.

The daffodils are blooming in Taylor as they do every spring to welcome back those who have fond memories of living there when it was a booming coal and clay company town. Taylor existed from 1892-1947, when the Seattle Public Utilities formed the Cedar River Watershed and closed the area to the public.

Each April the Utility District and Friends of the Cedar River Watershed offer the walking tour into Taylor for two weekends at a cost of $15. Participants gather at the Cedar River Watershed Visitors/Education Center for a slideshow of early day Taylor, then climb into vans for the 10-mile drive to the site.

The Education Center has interpretive exhibits that show where our water comes from and historical materials about the watershed area. It is an interesting place to browse anytime of the year. I especially like the musical artwork in the rain drum court where drops of water play tunes on the various drums. (more…)

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