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Archive for the ‘Railroads’ Category

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 18, 1906

Survey runs from Tacoma east of Orillia and stops at junction of the NP and Columbia & Puget Sound

James F. McElroy, Charley Farrell, and A.T. Van de Vanter buy large tract of land in path of right-of-way

“The Milwaukee road will complete a trackage arrangement with the Columbia & Puget Sound and enter Seattle over their rails.”

That was the statement made to a reporter for The Times last night by a man who stands closer to those behind the local Milwaukee guns than any other. He has been closely connected with Northwestern railroad affairs for years and may be relied upon thoroughly. Continuing, he said:

“You may say safely that the Milwaukee will cross the mountains through Snoqualmie Pass. The road will then run down through Rattlesnake Prairie and strike the Cedar River at Maple Valley. It will run toward the Sound as far as the junction of the Northern Pacific and Columbia & Puget Sound and will then enter Seattle over the C&PS tracks. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, January 18, 1907

Trainmen call on authorities for help but sheriff and police are conveniently absent

Railroad had been warned of the contemplated action

North Yakima, Jan. 9 — More than 200 desperate citizens of this city and farmers of the surrounding country held up a coal train at the station here at 3:30 yesterday afternoon and carried off all the fuel they needed to tide them over the cold snap. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 15, 1906

Milwaukee practically forced to take Snoqualmie Pass and preparatory measures are all along that line

Three-mile tunnel from point near head of Lake Keechelus would insure a maximum grade of about 1 percent

Extensive coal fields reaching from Renton to Roslyn with gap at the summit, strong point in favor

Northern Pacific engineers laying out and building the Yakima & Valley Railroad have practically blocked the Milwaukee out of Naches Pass and forced the selection of the Snoqualmie gateway to the Sound. Coast officials of the new transcontinental line are making all their preparations for the use of Snoqualmie Pass and only a showing of impossibility in grades or some new advantage in Naches Pass will change the present plan.

As Milwaukee officials have now marked out the route for that line across this state, the road will connect either inside or just outside the city limits with the Columbia & Puget Sound following that road up through the Cedar River Valley and across to Rattlesnake Prairie up to that point the company will gain a maximum grade of 8/10 of one percent. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 13, 1908

Men who held up saloon and killed Samuel Johnson baffle efforts of dogs and sheriff’s posses

Officers express belief that fugitives have succeeded in boarding a train and are out of country

Although numerous messages were received at the sheriff’s office today from those searching the woods in the vicinity of Kangley, where two highwaymen, while holding up the saloon of Joe Lacerdo Saturday night, shot and killed Samuel Johnson, none contained any definite information as to the hiding place of the two desperadoes. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 1, 1896

A petition for a bridge across Cedar River at Maple Valley was filed with the board of county commissioners yesterday, with fifty influential signatures, setting forth that the road of which the bridge would form a part is a convenient outlet from main roadways on all sides, connecting on the east with the Sagerson, Witte, Black Diamond, and Kent roads, for all of which it makes the shortest possible connections with the roads to Sherwood, Snoqualmie Falls, Issaquah, Cedar Mountain, and Renton.

The petition further recites that fording at the point named is impractical at some seasons and always attended with more or less danger. Many of the people living south of Cedar River are practically cut off from Maple Valley, although some of them contrive to cross on the railroad trestle.

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, December 27, 1923

The new logging camp at Lake Peterson has been making fast progress in their logging executions

The new logging camp at Lake Peterson has been making rapid strides lately in putting into execution their logging operations.

Mr. Wilson, who is managing the new camp, purchased a number of ties from Mr. Green, of the Hideaway Cash Store, and has extended Sandstrom Spur five hundred feet, giving loading accommodations for 60,000 feet a day.

They have two large donkeys, one at the woods and the other at the spur. They are laying the foundation for the loading stand.

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Originally published in the Seattle Sunday Times, December 25, 1955

By Lucile McDonald

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. – Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. –Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

The man who has lived in Renton longer than any other person—John E. Hayes, 13612 S.E. 128th St—well remembers the day in December, 1897, when the first standard-gauge train reached the town. He ought to; he was firing the engine.

The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad had bought the narrow-gauge coal line of the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad and extended it in 1882 to Black Diamond and Franklin. It left Seattle on a right-of-way shared with the Northern Pacific, a third rail being laid to accommodate the narrow-gauge cars bound for Renton. (more…)

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