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Posts Tagged ‘Taylor’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, November 20, 1966

By Rod Cardwell

Picturesque Maple Valley viewed from Echo Lake Cutoff to Snoqualmie Pass Highway; Boeing expansion spells rapid growth for Cedar River area. – Photos by TNT’s Bob Rudsit.

Picturesque Maple Valley viewed from Echo Lake Cutoff to Snoqualmie Pass Highway; Boeing expansion spells rapid growth for Cedar River area. – Photos by TNT’s Bob Rudsit.

MAPLE VALLEY, King County — Born 70 years ago in Italy, an ex-barber named Joe Mezzavilla still makes wine for his own table and is quite particular and uses only the best grapes from California.

And it is obviously a good medicine because he is a fine figure of a man, tall and erect … and with a full head of Latin-dark hair streaked with distinguished gray.

He has no use for most store-bought wines. In the accent of his native Venice, he explains, “I’m a make mine with a no sugar, no fortified stuff.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1994

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

A “love affair” with Selleck was evident at the reunion September 18 at the old grade school. Amandus Carlyle Butcher summed up the emotional attachment to the old sawmill town: “I love this country.”

Butcher went to all the first eight grades in Selleck and said it was the best place in the world to grow up.

His dad built the Kangley tavern in 1927 and ran it until 1932 while working days at the sawmill. Butcher hasn’t moved very far away, residing in Maple Valley. (more…)

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Originally published in Hobart Recollections, 1988

By Colin McDonald

Did you know that where the Hobart Fire Station now stands there was once a swamp?

In about 1931 (give or take a year) there was a swamp, starting at the corner of the Hobart and Taylor roads. It ran on about a 40- or 45-degree angle east, up close to where the old gym used to be.

The fill was made in a very unusual way, by today’s standards. In those days there was not a dump truck and bulldozer sitting on every corner. Mr. Bill Peacock, with his two horses, wagon, and Fresno scraper did the job over several months, hauling a yard to a yard and a half in each load. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, September 1992

By Mary Swift

Johnny Lazor has a chew in his hospital bed. (Valley Daily News photo by Gary Kissel.)

Johnny Lazor has a chew in his hospital bed. (Valley Daily News photo by Gary Kissel.)

RENTON — The Red Sox are still his favorite team, though former Red Sox player Johnny Lazor will be the first to admit they haven’t done much to cheer about this year.

Now Toronto, that’s a baseball team, Lazor says with the knowing look of a man who’s knocked clumps of sod out of his own cleats more than once in his life.

As for Seattle’s own Mariners: “They stink,” he says, wasting neither words nor sympathy.

At 80, it’s been a few decades since Lazor picked up a bat and stepped up to the plate to face a pitcher. Age has turned his hair white; time, however, hasn’t dulled the memories of his own ball-playing days.

Even as a farm kid growing up in the Taylor area in southeast King County, Lazor knew what he wanted to do. (more…)

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