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Posts Tagged ‘Taylor’

Originally published in Hobart Recollections, 1988

By Colin McDonald

Did you know that where the Hobart Fire Station now stands there was once a swamp?

In about 1931 (give or take a year) there was a swamp, starting at the corner of the Hobart and Taylor roads. It ran on about a 40- or 45-degree angle east, up close to where the old gym used to be.

The fill was made in a very unusual way, by today’s standards. In those days there was not a dump truck and bulldozer sitting on every corner. Mr. Bill Peacock, with his two horses, wagon, and Fresno scraper did the job over several months, hauling a yard to a yard and a half in each load. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, September 1992

By Mary Swift

Johnny Lazor has a chew in his hospital bed. (Valley Daily News photo by Gary Kissel.)

Johnny Lazor has a chew in his hospital bed. (Valley Daily News photo by Gary Kissel.)

RENTON — The Red Sox are still his favorite team, though former Red Sox player Johnny Lazor will be the first to admit they haven’t done much to cheer about this year.

Now Toronto, that’s a baseball team, Lazor says with the knowing look of a man who’s knocked clumps of sod out of his own cleats more than once in his life.

As for Seattle’s own Mariners: “They stink,” he says, wasting neither words nor sympathy.

At 80, it’s been a few decades since Lazor picked up a bat and stepped up to the plate to face a pitcher. Age has turned his hair white; time, however, hasn’t dulled the memories of his own ball-playing days.

Even as a farm kid growing up in the Taylor area in southeast King County, Lazor knew what he wanted to do. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, October 1994

The Lazor “children” out by the barn at the family farm on 208th. Seated are John and Mike Lazar and Mary Pilat. At back is Betty Lazor, Vince’s widow.

The Lazor “children” out by the barn at the family farm on 208th. Seated are John and Mike Lazar and Mary Pilat. At back is Betty Lazor, Vince’s widow.

Memories of the “old days” were flying fast on September 11 as generations of the Michael and Veronica Lazor family gathered with friends and neighbors at the former family farm on 208th Street.

The present owners, Paul and Gayle Kness, who purchased the farm in 1981, graciously welcomed some 40 Lazor descendants and former neighbors such as the Kralls and Junevitches for the reunion.

The three oldest Lazor children, Mary, Mike, and Johnny, were all present at the reunion. They were born in Taylor in the early 1900s. In 1914 they moved into the house their folks built on the 20-acre farm, where the youngest child, Vincent, was born. The farm was first sold in 1969 to the McDermand family. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, August 26, 1991

By Tina Hilding

Brick works at Denny Renton Clay and Coal Company, 1909. (Photos courtesy Renton Historical Museum.)

Brick works at Denny Renton Clay and Coal Company, 1909. (Photos courtesy Renton Historical Museum.)

RENTON — North America Refractories, hidden away on a small road east of Interstate 405, seems like an ordinary small industry.

The 60-acre property off Houser Way has been for sale for a number of years and is being considered as a site for a county regional justice center.

In its heyday in the early 1900s, the factory, located on the south side of the Cedar River, was the largest paving brick plant in Washington—some say in the United States or in the world. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1910

Period of greatest danger passed, through spectacular and successful work of fighting forces

Departments conflict on firing great guns

William Entwistle’s force risks death in mad race to Maple Valley with auto load of dynamite

The forest fire story in brief

Two bad fires break out near standing timber reserves, King County. Forest supervisors take 200 men into woods but fail to control conflagrations.

Blaze in young timber near Scenic Hot Springs breaks all bounds and is beyond control. Forest supervisor in charge.

Town of Walsh, on Columbia & Puget Sound, badly scorched, loss including one saloon, two-story dwelling house, barn, and buildings of England’s logging camp.

Dynamite to the amount of 500 pounds taken into Maple Valley district by fire fighters, who prepare to dynamite tops of trees in old timber to stop destructive fires.

Cooler weather makes work of forest fire workers easier, but danger will continue until rains fall.

The town of Bothell, at the head of Lake Washington, which was in danger of destruction yesterday, is reported safe. No buildings were destroyed. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, July 1994

By Barbara Nilson
Based on taped interview by Bill McDermand in November 1993 and interview by Barbara and Edward Nilson in June 1994.

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

But the road to the outfield of the Boston Red Sox in the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals wasn’t easy.

He was born in Taylor in 1912 to Veronica and Michael Lazor (pronounced Lawser in the Valley but known as Laser like the beam in baseball circles) who had immigrated from Czechoslovakia. His folks met in New York in the 1890s and went to Franklin around 1908 for his Dad to work in the mines dumping cars. They then moved to Taylor where the first of four children were born.

The oldest was Mary, born in 1908, then Mike, 1910, and Johnny was next. In 1914 the family moved onto their 20-acre farm in Hobart and the youngest boy, Vincent was born.

His folks paid $10 an acre for the farm, which they sold in 1969 to the Bill McDermand family. It is located on the old road to Taylor (S.E. 208th St.) on the north side. When his folks moved here it had all been logged off, but huge stumps remained. Lazor said it took a box and a half of powder just to blow them open. (more…)

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