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Posts Tagged ‘Taylor’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2000

By Barbara Nilson • Photos by Sherrie Acker

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Taylor as a company town was discussed at the reunion Oct. 17. Dale Sandhei said he thought they had it better than a lot of people at that time—they had a sewer system, pumped in water, electricity, and the coal was delivered to their homes.

The company was very benevolent; they built a swimming pool and cleaned it out once a year. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 1, 1913

BLACK DIAMOND, Wash., Monday, Sept. 1. – Miners from Renton, Carbonado, Wilkeson, Ravensdale, Taylor, and Newcastle are here today to help the local union of the United Mine Workers of America observe Labor Day. The day’s program opened this morning with a parade of 2,500 miners led by a band from Carbonado.

Following the parade the crowd went to the baseball park, where representative of the miners’ organization addressed the gathering. William Short acted as chairman and speeches were made by Martin Flyzik, vice-president of the district, and Frank Farrington, international representative of the mine workers’ organization.

Original plans for the speakers included an I.W.W. from Seattle, but members of the local who learned of the plan prevailed on the committee to cancel the engagement.

Races and a baseball game between Black Diamond and Taylor were held this afternoon.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 12, 1928

TAYLOR, Wash., Thursday, July 12. — The Gladding-McBean Company team of Taylor evened up its score with the Hobart town team Sunday, winning 8 to 6. It was Hobart’s first defeat, while the Taylor team has been defeated but once also.

The Hobart team will journey to Seattle next Sunday, where it will meet the Wilson & Kreitle nine at the Upper Woodland Park grounds at 2 o’clock.

Sunday’s score:

R H E
Hobart 6 8 2
Taylor 8 7 3

Batteries—Michael and Carey; Ball, Malette, McConnell, and McDonald.

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