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Posts Tagged ‘Prohibition’

Originally published in the Seattle Star, February 9, 1914

An appeal was filed this morning by Attorney Thomas Meade against the decision of the county commissioners prohibiting the town of Harrisburg to be incorporated instead of Ravensdale.

The fight involves a “dry” and “wet” issue.

Ravensdale was incorporated last year by the “wets,” and former Deputy Sheriff Starwich opened up a saloon. It was later discovered that a clerical error located the incorporated town six miles from where it is actually situated.

In spite of this, Meade charges, the saloon was allowed to operate, because the Northern Pacific, which owns most of Ravensdale, wanted it to run.

The “drys” got up a petition of their own, included a part of Ravensdale only, and sought incorporation. The Northern Pacific fought it, and Commissioners Hamilton and Knudsen threw the petition out.

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 28, 1888

Black Diamond, Aug. 25 – Everything is running smoothly, as usual. Shafts 14, 12, and 2 are running at their fullest capacity. Everybody is busy, and of course, happy.

School opened on Monday morning with an enrollment of 126 pupils, with more to come. If the present prosperity continues more school room will be needed shortly. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 29, 1921

Man using an axe to destroy a vat of alcohol, ca. 1925. (University of Washington Special Collections.)

Man using an axe to destroy a vat of alcohol, ca. 1925. (University of Washington Special Collections.)

Deputy sheriffs this noon raided the farm of Tony Susnar, eight miles from Black Diamond on the old Auburn-Black Diamond road, and found a ten-gallon still in operation.

Susnar was arrested and 100 gallons of mash were seized, together with a quart of moonshine whiskey. The mash was destroyed.

Susnar’s wife ran to an outhouse when the deputies approached the place and kicked over a quantity of completed product. The deputies allowed the still to operate during their search, the quart they held as evidence being distilled while they were there.

Susnar was taken to the county jail and the still and other evidence were locked in his vault by Sheriff Matt Starwich.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 26, 1923

On the front cover of the Pacific Coast Bulletin this week is reproduced a remarkable photograph of a man trip, just as it starts down the slope of Black Diamond Mine with a crew going on the graveyard shift. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 28, 1923

Giant booze plant found by raiders

Government agents destroy King County liquor plant with capacity of 150 gallons a day

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

After an ambush of many hours and a spectacular raid in which nearly a score of shots were fired, federal prohibition agents sent up in smoke yesterday, in a secluded valley about three miles from Black Diamond, a distillery, which, they believe, has been one of the largest sources of moonshine in the Northwest.

The distillery, complete from top to bottom, and boasting an oil burner, occupied an entire building—a former combination barn and hop kiln—and had, it is estimated, a capacity to produce from its several vats and its 800-gallon cooker, or still, about 150 gallons a day, which would bring its daily net earnings, considering the bootleggers’ quoted wholesale price, to approximately $900.

Nothing had been overlooked by the moonshiners in their apparent effort to manufacturer a good grade of liquor in great quantities and in varieties in the quickest possible time. There were vats for corn mash, for rye, for prune and for sugar mash, and a piping and valve system which made it possible for one man to operate the plant at top production. The value of the plant was estimated at about $10,000, including contents. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Star, November 22, 1928

Man using an axe to destroy a vat of alcohol, ca. 1925. (University of Washington Special Collections.)

Man using an axe to destroy a vat of alcohol, ca. 1925. (University of Washington Special Collections.)

The hills of Morganville were running with red wine Thursday.

Deputy sheriffs, in a raid at the home of Abramo Pennacchi, 37, an Italian carpenter, found 1,900 gallons of wine in his basement, they say, all of which was destroyed except enough for court evidence.

The wine was in two 400-gallon vats and 31 50-gallon barrels.

Pennacchi was charged Thursday with possession of liquor with intent to sell and bail fixed at $750.

He told Matt Thomas and Bill Herring, deputies, that he has a daughter employed in the Italian consul’s office in Seattle.

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