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Posts Tagged ‘Prohibition’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 16, 1916

Deputy State’s Attorney says even printing appears to have been imitated in Maple Valley seizure

Wholesale forgery, not only of the signatures on liquor permits, but the printing also, was alleged this morning by Deputy Prosecuting Attorney John D. Carmody in connection with the seizure at a railroad station Thursday night at Maple Valley of eight fifty-gallon barrels of whiskey and 115 dozen quarts of beer.

The illegal liquor was consigned to the Rexall Pharmacy at Maple Valley, with instructions to notify the Rexall Pharmacy at Ravensdale. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, July 22, 1992

David Horrocks

David Horrocks

In 1888, David Horrocks’ great-grandfather bought about 100 acres from the Northern Pacific Railroad along what is now Cedar Grove Road. David Horrocks was born on that land, 500 feet from where he and his wife Nancy live today.

During all that time, a fabulous history has developed in the upper Squak valley.

For the last five months, the Horrocks family has been piecing together the history and memories of a time that is lost for most people. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 22, 1919

Taken in whiskey raids. This photograph shows the largest and smallest stills seized by Sheriff John Stringer and his deputies since their war upon manufacturers of liquor in King County began. The larger still, with boiler, condenser, and goose neck, is four feet high and officers say is capable of producing from twelve to fifteen gallons of liquor a day. It, together with kegs and a washboiler of mash and two quarts of Grappa, was found in a sunken concrete room on the farm of Carl Arimeni, one mile from Newcastle. A galvanized water bucket, sauce pan with wire stand, and a tin basin made up the smaller still. It was seized at the home of H.H. Hammond, 722 Main St.

Taken in whiskey raids. This photograph shows the largest and smallest stills seized by Sheriff John Stringer and his deputies since their war upon manufacturers of liquor in King County began. The larger still, with boiler, condenser, and goose neck, is four feet high and officers say is capable of producing from twelve to fifteen gallons of liquor a day. It, together with kegs and a washboiler of mash and two quarts of Grappa, was found in a sunken concrete room on the farm of Carl Arimeni, one mile from Newcastle. A galvanized water bucket, sauce pan with wire stand, and a tin basin made up the smaller still. It was seized at the home of H.H. Hammond, 722 Main St.

After a search lasting three days, in which more than one-tenth of an acre of woodland was dug over with crowbars, picks and spades, deputy sheriffs yesterday afternoon found the largest still yet seized in King County, on the farm of Carl Arimeni, proprietor of a pool hall in that mining town.

Arimeni was arrested and is being held in the county jail, while Sheriff John Stringer, together with government officers, are making today a further investigation. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Star, February 9, 1914

An appeal was filed this morning by Attorney Thomas Meade against the decision of the county commissioners prohibiting the town of Harrisburg to be incorporated instead of Ravensdale.

The fight involves a “dry” and “wet” issue.

Ravensdale was incorporated last year by the “wets,” and former Deputy Sheriff Starwich opened up a saloon. It was later discovered that a clerical error located the incorporated town six miles from where it is actually situated.

In spite of this, Meade charges, the saloon was allowed to operate, because the Northern Pacific, which owns most of Ravensdale, wanted it to run.

The “drys” got up a petition of their own, included a part of Ravensdale only, and sought incorporation. The Northern Pacific fought it, and Commissioners Hamilton and Knudsen threw the petition out.

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 28, 1888

Black Diamond, Aug. 25 – Everything is running smoothly, as usual. Shafts 14, 12, and 2 are running at their fullest capacity. Everybody is busy, and of course, happy.

School opened on Monday morning with an enrollment of 126 pupils, with more to come. If the present prosperity continues more school room will be needed shortly. (more…)

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