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Posts Tagged ‘fishing’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 11, 1916

Lake trip ideal for motorists

Magnificent scenery found on tour to White Sulphur Spring—road passes along Cedar River Gorge

Abundant sport waits fishermen’s coming

Beauty spots on scenic drive. Two river canyons, each leading back into the Cascades, are followed on the tour presented by The Times today, terminating at Lake Wilderness, twenty-nine miles distant from the city. The colored illustration shows The Times pathfinder car, the Hupmobile, as it arrived at the lake shore. Below, in the accompanying photograph, is a view of the Green River canyon, shortly after the car had crossed the hill from Black Diamond.

Less than thirty miles from Seattle, at the end of a pathway which leads through ever-changing scenery, along the magnificent Cedar River gorge and up into the mining section of King County, lies Lake Wilderness, towards which The Times pathfinder car, a Hupmobile, blazed the trail for the second of the 1916 series of tours and the twenty-sixth in the grand total thus far logged by this newspaper.

The car, kindly furnished by Mr. Louis P. Schaeffer of the William T. Patten Motor Company, and driven by D.P. Dean, left The Times Building at Second Avenue and Union Street shortly after 9 o’clock and was at Lake Wilderness in ample time to permit an hour’s fishing in the lake before noon as an appetizer.

During the afternoon, the return was made by way of Black Diamond and Auburn, a slightly longer route but well worth the extra effort. In addition to providing variety to the trip, the alternate highway descended into a country of splendid roads and fascinating scenery, joining the Pacific Highway thence into Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 15, 1926

One of the institutions in Carbonado of which the camp is justly proud is the splendid Union Sunday School which recently passed the 100 mark in its membership. Mrs. J.W.L. Kaufman is the efficient superintendent of the Sunday School. She is assisted by a loyal corps of teachers and officers, all of whom are striving to make the organization even greater and better than it now is.

The Sunday School is undenominational, and it is unique in that all denominations and creeds represented are working in perfect harmony for the upbuilding of the religious and moral life of the community. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 8, 1926

Orchardists throughout the fruit districts of Eastern Washington depend upon Diamond Briquets to protect their blossoming trees from damage by frost. Consequently, this spring the Pacific Coast Coal Company conducted an extensive advertising campaign in the Yakima, Walla Walla, and Wenatchee districts, featuring Diamond Briquets as the ideal fuel for orchard heating.

This picture shows a window display arranged in Yakima, through the courtesy of the Yakima Daily Republic and the Yakima Morning Herald. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 1, 1926

Black Diamond has always maintained a reputation for turning out championship teams in baseball, but in the season which just closed, the camp held the distinction of honoring two soccer football teams, both of whom made splendid records.

In the group shown above are gathered the following players: Front row, left to right, “Chick” Thompson, Chas. “Red” Towers, A. Maroni, R. Durnac, John Ogden; second row, Chas. Maroni, Jas. Strang, Vic Roberts; back row, P.J. Gallagher, J.T. Hollow, and “Boots” Pierotti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 4, 1926

Every day from 450 to 500 tons of Diamond Briquets are loaded into railroad cars for shipment to almost every point where fuel is used between Canada and Mexico on the Pacific Coast. This scene shows how the briquets are lowered from the cooling conveyor into the cars. Thousands of tons of Diamond Briquets will soon be distributed throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington, where they will be burned to protect the fruit blossoms from the ravages of frost this spring. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, January 14, 2001

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Dan O’Brien/Journal

BLACK DIAMOND — There is a dancing light in the woods that offers a respite from the deep damp of winter.

Nestled beneath a snag forest of trunks and branches covered with moss, a rock pit glimmers in the late afternoon at the state park south of here. Not far away, the Green River rushes; Christy Creek gurgles closer.

The flaming geyser of Flaming Geyser State Park is a sprightly flame of methane gas 8 to 12 inches high that undulates atop a concrete pad. The wind sometimes blows it out, but the methane keeps on coming from deep underground, where fractured rivers of coal millions of years old still lie. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 31, 1884

Editor, Post-Intelligencer:

Your correspondent was yesterday placed under great obligations to Mr. J.L. Howard, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, by reason of an invitation, obtained through the kindness of Mayor Leary, to accompany himself, Mr. Leary and Mr. A.A. Denny over the new line of railroad stretching from our city toward the Green River coal fields, and known in common parlance as the Cedar River Extension. Mr. Denny was, to the regret of all, unable to attend.

The party was under the thoughtful care of Mr. T.J. Milner, the genial assistant superintendent of the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Publication unknown, 1997

By Mike Schroeder, Ravensdale’s volunteer lake monitor

Mike Schroeder enjoys the Northwest’s treats—Ravensdale Lake, a good cup of coffee, or a ferry trip out of town.

Ravensdale Lake is a relatively shallow spring-fed lake of about 17 acres, located in southeastern King County. Averaging about 4 feet in depth, the lake is over 16 feet deep at its deepest part. Ravensdale Creek, Lake Sawyer, Soos Creek, and the Green/Duwamish River system connect Ravensdale to Puget Sound.

The most rural lakes on the county monitoring program, Ravensdale is bordered mainly by private forest land, with railroad tracks running along its south shore. While a sand-mining operation located just across the tracks uses the lake as a water source, there is no development directly impacting the lake.

Alpine Fly Fishers and the Adopt-a-Stream program introduced me to Ravensdale Lake. For 2 years (1991-1993), we monitored stream flows and water quality in Ravensdale Creek. It proved to be quite healthy in general, in spite of impacts from the railroad, mining operations, and destructive off-road vehicular traffic in the stream bed itself. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 18, 1918

Though Cedar River boasts more fishermen per square foot along its banks than any other stream in King County, it is still favored by local anglers who follow the river up to its head at Landsberg. The usual run of fishermen stop off about six miles below this point at Maple Valley or else fish anywhere between Renton and Cedar Mountain, but these are old grounds habituated by numbers of picnic parties and campers who spoil any chance for real sport. (more…)

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