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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 18, 1928

Vacationist may find ideal spot less than hour’s drive from Seattle—if he looks closely

Try to paint this picture. Lovely Lake Sawyer is one of the most popular vacation resorts in the Northwest. Less than an hour’s drive from Seattle, Lake Sawyer is ideal for an afternoon outing and picnic. Lake Sawyer Paradise, under the direction of Mrs. Anita Campbell, is one of the very fine resorts situated on the shores of the lake, splendidly equipped with cottages, boats, canoes, picnic groves, and other essentials to a delightful vacation.

Try to paint this picture. Lovely Lake Sawyer is one of the most popular vacation resorts in the Northwest. Less than an hour’s drive from Seattle, Lake Sawyer is ideal for an afternoon outing and picnic. Lake Sawyer Paradise, under the direction of Mrs. Anita Campbell, is one of the very fine resorts situated on the shores of the lake, splendidly equipped with cottages, boats, canoes, picnic groves, and other essentials to a delightful vacation.

No wonder the Eastern visitor to the Northwest exclaims at the wonderful scenery and wealth of lakes and rivers that abound here. It is beyond the understanding of most of us who have lived here for the greater part of our lives.

The outstanding feature, according to some of the tourists is the places in which one will find a bevy of lakes. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast magazine, June 1, 1906

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

The Green River above Franklin, Washington

June is the month and summer is the time in which to take a trip to Black Diamond and Franklin, Washington, for then the trees are green and blooming flowers fill the air with pleasing odors; for then the sportsman can whip the fish-filled Green River and lure the gamey trout from placid pools to repose within his basket; the birds fill the air with charming melodies; all nature smiles and glows with new and increasing life to shine in growing splendor; and, then, the grand snow-capped mountain—Mt. Rainier—looks more beautiful and lovely than at any other time of the year as it towers high above all its surroundings, a crystal gem of purest white, held in a setting of everlasting and eternal green. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1923

Beautiful trip close at hand: Trip to Lake Sawyer delights

Lovely body of water, studded with islands, lies straight east of Kent and thirty-one miles from Seattle

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Too many motorists, when planning their weekend or Sunday trips, consider only those run-ups that take one many miles away from Seattle. They have their eyes focused, so to speak, on the distant points and miss altogether the wholly delightful places close to home. Like the children in Maeterlinck’s play who sought the blue bird all over the world and returned, finally, to find it had been in their own home all the time.

One of the chief charms of this Puget Sound country, however, and one of the things that makes owning an automobile so enjoyable, is the fact that there are dozens and dozens of delightful trips within a range of forty miles out of Seattle. It is not necessary for motorists to range far afield, to drive miles and miles before reaching interesting and pretty country, as is true In the East and South.

Trip to Lake Sawyer

For instance, there is the trip taken by The Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe last week, the trip to Lake Sawyer. Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company, proposed the trip. Austin reasoned that it seemed rather foolish to ignore the scenic attractions close to home and he promised that the trip would prove a pleasant surprise, so down Rainier Valley the Oakland started. (more…)

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(This is the ninth of a series of articles describing the weekend tours of Joe and Janice Krenmayr of Seattle, who are renewing acquaintance with their home county after nearly five years in Central and South America.)

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 8, 1952

Fishing and boating are but two of the many amusements offered at Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness Lodge.

Fishing and boating are but two of the many amusements offered at Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness Lodge.

By Janice Krenmayr

Fortunately for us there are any number of little lakes and pleasure resorts within a short distance of Seattle. For Joe, enmeshed in some household remodeling, had time for only a quick trip on Weekend No. 9.

Lake Wilderness, 12 miles east of Renton and Kent, was within that range. Many years ago we’d had fun on an office picnic here, but now we stood on the boating dock at Gaffney’s Grove, a little startled at the changes. The riding stables, baseball diamond, roller rink, dance hall, horseshoe pits … were they there before? There seemed to be many more cottages, too.

Despite its growth in popularity the little lake still retains the atmosphere which must have inspired its name. Set plump in the middle of thick woods, the shimmering green water seems to be trying to push back the trees that crowd to its very edge. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 16 and 23, 1977

By Jalo Lahtinen

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the East Fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the east fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

When you tell someone you’re from Hobart, “Where is Hobart?” they ask.

It is at the headwaters of Issaquah Creek, the two forks known to us old stump jumpers by the following names—north fork as Holder’s Creek, east fork as Carry’s Creek.

It’s part of Cedar River Valley, nestled in the foothills of the Cascades with an eastern view of the Stampede Pass area and Mount Rainier to the south.

Once a sawmill town and farming area with self-sustaining farms and part-time stump farmers it was a paradise, a boy’s dream. Our mountains—Tiger, Taylor, and Sherwood were covered with the forest primeval, a cathedral of the Gods, an emerald jewel that God dropped in the right location, only a three-to-four mile area.

Near the summit of Sherwood is a beautiful spring two to three feet across, a trickle of the most beautiful blue water you could lay your eyes on running out of it—cold, refreshing, and thirst quenching.

Our streams were full of spawning salmon and land-locked sockeye in the fall, spawning by the hundreds. We called them red fish, cut-throat, and steelhead—no trick to catch a mess at any time. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1888

A community where constables and officers of the law are not needed—Remarkable progress and substantial prosperity

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Probably the majority of the readers of the Post-Intelligencer have never inspected a coal mine or visited a town where coal mining was the exclusive industry. They have, therefore, necessarily but an imperfect knowledge of a large and very excellent class of the working population of this territory, and especially of King County.

A representative of this paper visited Franklin, in this county, a day or two ago and made some observations which may be of general interest. (more…)

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