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Posts Tagged ‘fishing’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 7, 1925

Before sailing for the four thousand mile trip to Japan, where they will act as a convoy to Lieut. Col. Pedro L. Zanni, intrepid Argentine army aviator, the two 100-foot North Sea trawlers shown in the halftone above, called at the bunkers of the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Seattle to load fuel for the hazardous voyage.

The two staunch little vessels are the Canada and the Imbricaria, both of which have been chartered by the Argentine government to patrol the route across the Pacific recently followed by the globe-girdling American army flyers. This will be the course which Col. Zanni will take, winging his way eastward from Japan. (more…)

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Originally published in North Maple Valley Living, April 2019

By JoAnne Matsumura

Anglers took to the lakes and streams at dawn for opening day of fishing on “All Fool’s Day,” April 1, 1919, and those along the Cedar River reported “the fish were biting fine.”

State Game and Fish Commissioner L.H. Darwin reported that this was best year ever for angling with excellent conditions in King County. At Lake Wilderness, the water was clear, fairly high, with trout being taken principally, yet offering good bass.

Licenses in the state exceeded 2,500, and school attendance was expected to have a marked decrease with a flood of creative excuses. Game wardens were on the job for fishing pranks, fish under 6 inches, and those setting traps. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 9, 1925

Playing together for the first time this season, the soccer football squad at Newcastle has been one of the strong contenders for honors in the state league. The camp has loyally supported the boys and in turn the players have been a credit to the camp. One of the team, Bert Blondell, was chosen to play with the Washington All-Stars in the game against the All-Stars of Victoria, B.C.

In the picture, from left to right standing: Tim Riley, Jack Lucas, Don Campbell, Bert Blondell, Jock Clark, Jim Strang, Bob Gelling, Dave Forbes, Jimmy Walton, Joe Oschberger, and W.S. Hart. In front, left to right: Dan Minele, Bob Miles, C. Mikola, Arthur Kelly, Gus Lapsansky, Ted Jackson, captain of the team, Harold Phillips, Jim McCarthy, “Hen” Roberts. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2005

By Barbara Nilson

Francis Niemela displays a sketch of the cabin his father Charles built of railroad ties on Lake Francis in 1915.

Francis Niemela displays a sketch of the cabin his father Charles built of railroad ties on Lake Francis in 1915.

Eighty-four years of memories will be on tap, Sunday, Feb. 12, [2006,] at the Grange Hall, when Francis Niemela recalls life with the Finnish community on Lake Francis. His parents, Charles and Katri Niemela, came to Maple Valley and purchased 20 acres at the lake in 1915.

During that time there was a railroad that came around the lake and his Dad picked up railroad ties and built his first house out of them. Later that building was converted to a sauna and also used for smoking salmon and bacon when they constructed a large loghouse in 1918. That home was later purchased by the Dufenhorst family.

The Finns at Lake Francis had little stump ranches and their saunas in place of indoor plumbing. Niemela said the greatest sauna was the Lahtinen’s. It was open house every Saturday night and Mrs. Lahtinen would serve coffee and goodies. “Some of the offspring of those Finns like Walt Sipila and Walt Miller are still here,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 10, 1924

Seldom are train robbers obliging enough to pose for a photograph, but down at San Luis Obispo, California, the Pacific Coast Railway Company’s “Valley Flier” was recently held up by a band of armed men at Exposition Grounds station, just outside of San Luis Obispo, and this picture attests the fact that there was a photographer in the vicinity. The Rotary Club emblem on the rear coach, however, calls for an explanation.

The train carried a party of Rotarians from Santa Maria and the two-gun bandit in cowboy attire was none other than W.T. Masengill, superintendent of the Pacific Coast Railway, who assisted in removing the passengers and carrying them off into the woods. The Pacific Coast Railway is a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 3, 1979

By Dianne Wilson

Quiet elegance, country charm, and comfortable atmosphere can all be used to describe The Dinner House, Black Diamond’s answer to the restaurant needs of the area. For the first time diners can enjoy a good meal in pleasant surroundings without driving a distance.

Last week my son Eric and I responded to the claim of “only the best.” Former patrons of Morganville Tavern would not recognize the place. Walls and ceilings are a warm, deep rose-red. Antique lovers will appreciate the authentic tables and chairs, interspersed with quality pieces including a lonely old sideboard and a china closet with beveled glass, as well as old-style bric-a-brac. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 19, 1979

The above maps shows structural facilities proposed for a Cedar River salmon hatchery near Landsburg. – Courtesy Washington State Department of Fisheries.

The above maps shows structural facilities proposed for a Cedar River salmon hatchery near Landsburg. – Courtesy Washington State Department of Fisheries.

Further plans regarding the expansion of salmon rearing facilities at the Seattle Water Department Park on the Cedar River near Landsburg have been announced by the State Department of Fisheries. (more…)

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