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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 2, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Could this Black Diamond field become the site for a new King County Library?

Several months ago, the Black Diamond City Council held a public hearing on a request for a conditional site use permit for the King County Library System.

At that time, the library district was developing plans for a new library with parking and landscape improvements on a site on Jones Lake Road. Black Diamond City Council granted the request with special conditions. However, KCLS withdrew the application after citizens expressed concern about the site. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 23, 2015

By Kathleen Kear

Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) presented long-time Black Diamond resident Gomer Evans with a national Distinguished Citizen Medal.

Making his way to the Black Diamond Library with his daughter Sherrie Evans, who wanted to pick up a library book, Gomer Evans, long-time Black Diamond community member, was quite surprised to see a room full of friends shouting, “Surprise!”—when he entered.

Evans was doubly surprised when he learned during a short ceremony presented by Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) local Chapter Regent Jeannette Carroll, on Saturday, April 25, that he had been chosen for a national Distinguished Citizen Medal from DAR Nominations for the medal begin at the organization’s chapter level and make their way to the national level where they are scrutinized by the DAR National Society in Washington D.C. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, June 4, 2002

King County considers purchasing Black Diamond property at four times its assessed value

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

A public notice marks property off Jones Lake Road in Black Diamond where the King County Library System hopes to build a 5,200-square-foot library. (Matt Brashears/Journal)

BLACK DIAMOND — The King County Library System is prepared to pay more than four times the assessed value for a piece of view property for a new Black Diamond library.

It is assessed by the King County Assessor at $91,000 for 2002. The sale price, however, is $400,000 and the King County Libraries System is willing to pay the price. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, April 25, 2002

Concrete block now encases meeting spot of coal miners’ union

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Paul Botts, left, 87, one of the last underground miners from Black Diamond, and Don Mason, president of the Black Diamond Historical Society, stand at the Union Stump. Now enclosed in concrete, the old fir stump was used in 1907 in Black Diamond to rally miners and start a union. (Gary Kissel/JournaI)

BLACK DIAMOND — Paul Botts remembers seeing the Union Stump as a youngster.

Now 87, he is among the last of the underground coal miners still living in the area. And Botts still is a member of United Mine Workers Local 6481.

“Dues are $6 a month. And I still get benefits,” Botts said last week, leaning against the large, square block of concrete encasing the old fir stump—where union history was made nearly a century ago, debates were argued, rallies were held, and strikes were called.

Like mining itself, Local 6481 left Black Diamond years ago. Now the local is located in Ogden, Utah, Botts said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Tacoma News Tribune, April 5, 1995

By Lisa Kremer
The News Tribune

Bob Eaton, president of the Black Diamond Historical Society, and his granddaughter Kelley Sauskojus are trying to get a miners’ cabin built in 1910 near Black Diamond designated a local historic landmark. (Peter Haley/The News Tribune.)

In 1910, two Italian men built a tiny house—barely big enough for beds, a stove, and a sink—to live in as they worked in the nearby mines of Black Diamond.

There’s not much to distinguish the house from hundreds of other small miner’s cabins that dotted the hillsides. Except that this house is still there, almost in its original condition.

Bob Eaton, president of the Black Diamond Historical Society, wants to preserve the house and designate it a local historic landmark. That would mean his granddaughter Kelley Sauskojus, who owns the cabin, could apply for state grants to repair and restore it.

But like all other South King County cities, Black Diamond doesn’t have a process to officially designate its local landmarks.

It’s so difficult to designate city landmarks that only two cities in King County—Seattle and Bothell—have done so, said Charlie Sundberg, a preservation planner with the King County Historic Preservation program. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 15, 2000

By Cecilia Nguyen

For years Black Diamond has struggled to develop a plan that would make the city economically self-sufficient while maintaining the small town character.

A strong local economy with a healthy tax base would provide Black Diamond the much-needed funds to improve its capital facilities.

Financial relief for the small, former mining town may soon be a reality. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 4, 1926

Editors and publishers of approximately 100 newspapers in the State of Washington were the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle and the Briquet Plant, last Saturday. This excursion was the closing feature of the Fourteenth Annual Newspaper Institute of the Washington Press Association.

The picture shows the group ready to board the special train after having made a trip into the Primrose Seam, a mile and a quarter into the heart of the mountain, from whence comes the famous Newcastle coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, November 13, 1996

By Casey Olson
The Courier-Herald

No video tape in the world could hold the rich history of the Black Diamond community.

There is just too much of it.

But give Bob Eaton and Micki Ryan a lot of credit. The pair is undertaking the mission impossible and attempting to put together the first-ever video history of the history-rich town.

They’ve found the task fascinating and time consuming.

The coal mining industry brought immigrants from all around the world to the tiny hamlet nestled in the Cascade foothills during the late 1800s and early 1900s, turning the quiet community into a bustling city. Italians, Greeks, Chinese, Germans, Hungarians, and Irish were blended together every day, a clash of cultures that helped form the modern day community of Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 8, 1925

Playing good, consistent ball throughout the entire season, the Black Diamond baseball team ended up with flying colors, the champions of the Pacific Coast Coal League for 1925. Saturday night, October 10, the team will celebrate the close of the season with a banquet at the hotel.

In the picture, left to right, front row—F.C. Bergmann, secretary of the club; Geo. Spencer, Johnny Buck, Pete Gallagher, mascot; Neil Andreson, Mike Naffer, H.J. Babb, manager; back row Geo. Allen, treasurer; Grover Kertis, captain: L. Pierotti, Joe Daley, E. Moon Mullen, S. Paxton, Lou LaFray, Joe Snorski, and Wm. Nicholson, president. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, September 7, 1988

Black Diamond is polishing its image and smoothing out some of the rough spots that were defined in the city’s June 15 economic summit. The city is already working to eliminate its business and occupation tax and has formed a chamber-type organization of merchants and citizens. (more…)

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