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Posts Tagged ‘library’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 14, 1925

Under the baton of Bandmaster Henry Carroll, the Black Diamond and Newcastle bands of the Pacific Coast Coal Company journeyed to Bellingham last week, where they participated in the celebration of the Sixth Annual Tulip Festival.

The two bands combined, made a musical organization of thirty-six pieces, and attired in miners’ caps they presented a fine and distinctive appearance. In the upper portion of the halftone they are shown lined up just before the big parade, while below the Bulletin photographer caught them in action. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 2, 1925

Here may be nothing inspiring about the picture of a box car on the team track at Omak, Washington. But the significance of this scene lies in the fact that approximately seven thousand orchard heaters, designed to burn Diamond Briquets, were unloaded from that car last week.

These heaters are scattered throughout the orchards of the fertile Okanogan Valley, and in conjunction with the almost certain appearance of Jack Frost, will result in the consumption of hundreds of tons of briquets this spring where formerly briquets had never been seen. Similar shipments of orchard heaters have also recently been unloaded in the Yakima and Walla Walla fruit districts. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 5, 1925

Every concern is on the lookout for good men and that is why you seldom hear a good man complaining about not getting enough salary. When the firm he is with fails to pay him all his services are worth someone else is going to come along and do it. — Coleman Cox. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 7, 1924

Newcastle has always enjoyed the reputation of having one of the finest club organizations in existence among the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. Naturally then, it would be expected that they would possess a fine home.

That such is the case can be seen from the half-tone shown herewith which gives a fair idea of the commodious quarters occupied by the club. In the rear is a hall in which dances are held, and which is equipped also with a ladies’ rest room, check room, and kitchen. The front of the building is utilized by the club for its card and pool tables. “Hen” Roberts is manager of the club. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 24, 1924

Situated one block east of the main highway which runs through Burnett is the cozy little home of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Hultquist. The front yard of their place, surrounded by a neat picket fence, is one of the show spots of the camp. Its mass of flowering plants and shrubs, with climbing vines and grassy lawn forming a verdant background, presents a pleasing scene indeed. In the picture, which cannot possibly do justice to the beauty of the scene, there is shown the word “Burnett” formed from growing shrubs, behind which is a luxuriant growth of bright blossoms.

Hultquist is an American citizen and a timberman in Burnett Mine. He came to the camp on January 10, 1922, formerly having worked in Tacoma, and in the mines of Cripple Creek, Leadville, and Aspen, Colorado. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, August 31, 1988

BLACK DIAMOND — Thousands of people are expected to take a break from work at the annual Black Diamond Labor Day festival this weekend.

An adult dance opens the celebration Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., at the Black Diamond Eagles Hall. A midnight buffet will be served, and “White Water” will provide the music.

Marching bands, antique cars, children’s groups, floats, and horses will participate in Monday’s parade, which begins at 10 a.m. The parade travels on Highway 169 from Third and Lawson streets to the baseball diamond at Black Diamond Elementary School. (more…)

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Original published in the Voice of the Valley, September 16, 1998

By Cecilia Nguyen

With the slogan ‘Read to Succeed’ Black Diamond Library advertises the importance of literacy courtesy of Black Diamond Librarian Laverne Harris’ Friendly Acres Horse Farm.

With the slogan ‘Read to Succeed’ Black Diamond Library advertises the importance of literacy courtesy of Black Diamond Librarian Laverne Harris’ Friendly Acres Horse Farm.

Black Diamond is known for its coal mining history. Part of that history included strained labor relations between coal miners and mine operators.

In 1907, at the “Union Stump,” in the area in town known as Morganville, mine workers voted to unify. From that day on, coal miners gradually began to see working conditions and benefits improve for the thousands of men who flocked to the coal mines for wages. (more…)

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