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Posts Tagged ‘Mine #11’

By Bill Kombol

King County Assessor tax parcel No. 112106-9035

The location of the Black Diamond branch of Mount Rainier Bank [Columbia Bank, 2019] has a short, but interesting history.

The property is located in the south half of Section 11, Township 21 North, Range 6 East, W.M. Like all odd-numbered sections in this area, the property in Section 11 was originally part of a land grant by the United States to the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1873 for construction of a transcontinental railroad. In adjacent even-numbered sections, the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company had begun mining coal after moving their operations north from the Mount Diablo coal fields near Nortonville, California, east of San Francisco. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 6, 1927

Auburn party visits New Black Diamond Mine

Learn fine points of underground work at new property of Pacific Coast Coal Company

By Ellis Coe

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

To a novice in the coal mining business, who has never been further underground than the depth of his neighbor’s cellar, a trip of more than one mile into the heart of a mountain of coal is somewhat of an experience. Further than that, when blasting operations begin while this same novice is underground, it heightens the interest in the experience. The question as to whether the stay in the heart of the mountain will be permanent immediately enters the mind of the quasi coal digger, with the odds in favor of permanency. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 30, 1925

Old Black Diamond Mine No. 11, deepest colliery in the United States, is scene of fatal ‘bump’

Two men lost their lives and three others were imprisoned for eight hours before being released by a rescue crew following a cave-in that occurred in the old Black Diamond Mine No. 11 at Black Diamond yesterday afternoon.

The dead are W.R. Brunner, 36, years old, and Emilo Piquet, 35, both of Black Diamond.

Eight men were working in the vicinity of the cave-in. In addition to the two who lost their lives, three were imprisoned by the slide and three escaped without assistance. The six who were rescued or escaped were H.R. Algee, Walter Faulkner, Ben Davis, Walter Remus, E.M. Anthony, and George Belt. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 24, 1913

Blast in Black Diamond Mine, of unknown origin, kills workman—his fellows in serious condition

Violation of rules suspected as cause: Required precautions observed by Pacific Coast Co., exposed lamp or match thought to blame

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

Jack Jackson was killed and Ned Rossi and Eugene Pelline, miners, were seriously burned in an explosion this morning on the tenth level of No. 14 mine at Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 1, 1924

What more could a girl want than to enjoy the privileges of membership in the Ta-Ta-Pochon Camp Fire of Burnett? Ask any of the young ladies who appear in the group shown herewith and you’ll get an emphatic answer. California’s press agents couldn’t muster a finer bevy of feminine pulchritude in all of Mack Sennett’s legions than Burnett can boast.

From left to right they are: Ida Ellis, Audrey Parry, Margaret Murnan, Alma Johnson, Lee Dora Bumgarner, Mary Jackson, June Vernon, Hazel Miller, and Lee Miller. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 18, 1924

July Fourth was a big day for Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets at Sedro-Woolley. On that occasion W.E. Ropes of Ropes Transfer carried off first prize in the patriotic parade with the float shown in the above engraving. Mr. Ropes has been operating in Sedro-Woolley for 14 years and he handles Pacific Coast Coal Company coals exclusively.

Some fine specimens of Black Diamond lump coal were arranged along the top of the float just under the slogan, “Heat That’s Cheap,” while along the sides appeared the word “Briquets,” spelled out with genuine Diamond Briquets themselves.

On the same day in Everett the Pacific Coast Coal Company agency there also won first prize with a beautifully decorated float, a reproduction of which appears elsewhere in this issue of the Bulletin. (more…)

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