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Posts Tagged ‘Mine #11’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 1, 1924

What more could a girl want than to enjoy the privileges of membership in the Ta-Ta-Pochon Camp Fire of Burnett? Ask any of the young ladies who appear in the group shown herewith and you’ll get an emphatic answer. California’s press agents couldn’t muster a finer bevy of feminine pulchritude in all of Mack Sennett’s legions than Burnett can boast.

From left to right they are: Ida Ellis, Audrey Parry, Margaret Murnan, Alma Johnson, Lee Dora Bumgarner, Mary Jackson, June Vernon, Hazel Miller, and Lee Miller. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 18, 1924

July Fourth was a big day for Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets at Sedro-Woolley. On that occasion W.E. Ropes of Ropes Transfer carried off first prize in the patriotic parade with the float shown in the above engraving. Mr. Ropes has been operating in Sedro-Woolley for 14 years and he handles Pacific Coast Coal Company coals exclusively.

Some fine specimens of Black Diamond lump coal were arranged along the top of the float just under the slogan, “Heat That’s Cheap,” while along the sides appeared the word “Briquets,” spelled out with genuine Diamond Briquets themselves.

On the same day in Everett the Pacific Coast Coal Company agency there also won first prize with a beautifully decorated float, a reproduction of which appears elsewhere in this issue of the Bulletin. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 4, 1924

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Hospitality in unbounded measure is the welcome which will be extended all who participate in the Fourth of July celebration at Black Diamond. Particular emphasis is being laid upon the fact that the children are to be given first attention, free ice cream and refreshments having been provided for every child. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 30, 1924

One institution of which Burnett is justly proud is the company store, a picture of which is herewith shown. L.W. Foreman is the capable and accommodating manager of the store and with his efficient corps of helpers he is making it an institution of real service to the camp.

A prompt delivery service is maintained, which with the high quality of the merchandise carried, is another one of the reasons for the general appeal of the company store to all residents of Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 8, 1924

Not a feminine foot faltered when the guides for this group of King County P.T.A. members led the way into the dark recesses of the Primrose Tunnel at Newcastle. These women, a portion of 300 who recently visited Newcastle Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, here saw firsthand the actual processes of coal mining.

The guides for this group were, Dan Carey, Jas. E. Ash, and Phillip Chase, all of the Engineering Department. John Eck, fireboss in charge of the operations at Primrose, is kneeling at the left. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 1, 1924

Cooley goes through mine accident unhurt

Imprisoned under a fall of rock and coal and only saved from being crushed by a single timber, Manley Cooley was rescued from Chute 29, 11th level, south, of Black Diamond Mine shortly before six o’clock last Tuesday evening.

Rescuers had worked without easing from 9:20 p.m. of Monday, when a “bump” occurred in Chutes 29 and 30 of the 11th level. Their efforts were in vain, however, for Robt. Doucette and O.C. Wise, both of who suffered instant death when the crash came.

Doucette’s body was recovered from Chute 30 about 11 o’clock Tuesday morning, but it was not until 4 a.m. of Wednesday that Wise was found in Chute 29. (more…)

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