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Posts Tagged ‘Mine #11’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1923

If working a shift in Black Diamond Mine was no harder for the four men shown above than it was for them to pose for this picture, there would always be a mad scramble among the men to see who could get the first man-trip down.

At the left we introduce to you, George Belt, and next to him, Fred Cunningham, a former Issaquah miner. The man next in line is R.E. “Curly” Campbell and the young Hercules at the extreme right is Darwin Walton. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 17, 1923

Toonerville trolley

Toonerville trolley

Guided by the accommodating hand of Supt. J.J. Jones, the editor of the Bulletin was conducted through Black Diamond Mine last Friday, May 11, and initiated into the mysteries of digging coal.

Down on the 12th Level, in Chute No. 1, on the South Side, J.D. Walton gave a demonstration of how a pick is used in digging, while up at the face in the gangway some of the boys were busy with a jack hammer, driving the gangway still further along the seam.

At the 11th Level Pete Kurth, cager, was found on the job, busy with the constant string of trips coming and going. Going on up to the 9th, the trip was made on the “Toonerville Trolley”—the auxiliary hoist between the 12th and 7th Levels used until the 12th Level is developed extensively enough to permit the switching of the main trip. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 13, 1904

General Manager Ford ends negotiations in southern city

J.C. Ford

J.C. Ford

Rich coal deposits on C. & P. S. Ry. transferred for $1,000,000

SAN FRANCISCO, Friday, May 13 — J.C. Ford, general manager of the Pacific Coast Company, has been in this city for some days negotiating with President H.H. Taylor for the purchase of the Black Diamond coal mines on Puget Sound.

This afternoon at the office of the Black Diamond Company a representative of The Times was told that the deal had been closed. The price named was $1,000,000. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 1, 1904

Deal the largest ever consummated in the State of Washington

Million dollars to be paid by purchasers for the fuel fields

The Black Diamond coal mines are to be sold to the Pacific Coast Company, $1,000,000 being paid for the properties. Negotiations for the acquirement of the coal lands and workings, which have been in progress for nearly four months, are practically completed and the formal transfer will be made within a few days.

This is the largest deal ever made in this state involving coal lands, and will give the Pacific Coast Company a total production of 2,500 tons daily. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 26, 1923

On the front cover of the Pacific Coast Bulletin this week is reproduced a remarkable photograph of a man trip, just as it starts down the slope of Black Diamond Mine with a crew going on the graveyard shift. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 25, 1929

Sixty-six years ago next fall “Ed” Henderson sighted an imaginary line across the foothills of the Cascade Mountains which revealed one of the cornerstones of community and industrial progress in the Pacific Northwest. Engaged in surveying, he became the discoverer of an extensive coal field from the various developments of which millions of tons of coal have been poured into the uses of commerce during the last half-century.

The only commercial coal produced in the Pacific States is mined within a radius of seventy miles from this discovery, and therefore it commands an extensive market. Next to lumber it is the most enriching natural wealth of the region, the annual output being normally about 2,500,000 tons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 6, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

All the fuss about the Mariners, Seattle’s new major league ball team is okay, according to Diodato (Duda) Vernarelli of Black Diamond, but to him the familiar cry of “Play Ball” has a new meaning. It brings back memories of “Sand Lot” baseball and pleasant thoughts of bygone days in this area. Baseball was a popular and important sport in the mining towns that once dotted the area. The above picture of “Duda” and his “spring swing” was taken in 1923.

All the fuss about the Mariners, Seattle’s new major league ball team is okay, according to Diodato (Duda) Vernarelli of Black Diamond, but to him the familiar cry of “Play Ball” has a new meaning. It brings back memories of “Sand Lot” baseball and pleasant thoughts of bygone days in this area. Baseball was a popular and important sport in the mining towns that once dotted the area. The above picture of “Duda” and his “spring swing” was taken in 1923.

As the cry “Play Ball” echoes across the land, baseball enthusiasts all throughout Puget Sound country are greatly excited about the Seattle Mariners, newly formed Major League expansion team. But that familiar cry has a different meaning for Diodato (Duda) Vernarelli of Black Diamond … it means “Sand Lot” and pleasant memories of bygone days.

As Duda recalls, in the 1920s baseball was an important and popular sport in all the mining towns that dotted the area. At that time there were four teams in Black Diamond plus the “big team,” the Pacific Coast League Briquettes.

Commonly called sand lots, they were actually only cleared areas in the fields approximately 100 by 150 feet. He laughed as he told us some of the problems encountered.

At that time Black Diamond had no “herd laws” and many families had milk cows which were allowed to graze freely during the spring and summer months.

The cows enjoyed resting in these cleared fields which retained the warmth of the sun into the night, and the constant ding-ding of their bells was a familiar sound. The results? We can only say the baseball teams had some problems the Mariners won’t have to contend with in the Kingdome. (more…)

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