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Posts Tagged ‘Mine #11’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 10, 1924

Recently the Bulletin photographer succeeded in holding a group of men ready to board the man trip for a shift in Black Diamond Mine, by promising that the picture obtained would be published in the Bulletin. The gang of husky appearing miners and underground workmen seen above was the result. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 1, 1923

Situated at the mouth of the slope the view shown above of the top works at Burnett Mine, the home of South Prairie Coal, does not give any idea of the depth of the gorge through which South Prairie creek flows. The buildings in the foreground are but half way between the creek below and the top of the hill from which the bridge extends across the yawning gorge.

At the left is seen the wash house, while the long building in the center of the picture houses the machine shop and lamp room. Just back of them can be seen the top of the tipple, indicating the depth of the valley below. In the background is seen the rock dump and the big steel span which bridges the creek. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 11, 1923

Thirteen years ago the present rock dump of Mine 11, at Black Diamond, was begun. Though the mine had been in operation for many years prior to 1910, it was then that the present dump was started when the old dump caught fire. This dump is today an imposing pile of rock and waste material brought out of the mine, and it is constantly growing.

Like a small mountain it rises out of the wide expanse of the valley and is visible for a considerable distance. At night the numerous fires which blaze constantly from its base to its summit make it loom up much after the manner of the biblical Pillar of Fire. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, September 4, 1987

By Debra Nelson

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Coal mining… the words evoke images of dark mine shafts, dynamite, and hardy men, exhausted from the hazards of blasting the mineral from deep within the earth, ravaged by black lung disease.

The old folk song “Sixteen Tons” tells that story—of men who rarely saw the sun and whose blood and sweat made coal the major industry in the Black Diamond region until the 1920s.

But those were the “good old days” of coal mining and, fortunately, the industry has undergone radical changes. For one thing, today’s miners work above ground, in the hot summer sun and the cold winter rain.

This Labor Day weekend, Black Diamond looks back at the old days, remembering those pioneers and miners who settled the town. The festivities include the kind of fun and games many pioneer kids enjoyed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1923

If working a shift in Black Diamond Mine was no harder for the four men shown above than it was for them to pose for this picture, there would always be a mad scramble among the men to see who could get the first man-trip down.

At the left we introduce to you, George Belt, and next to him, Fred Cunningham, a former Issaquah miner. The man next in line is R.E. “Curly” Campbell and the young Hercules at the extreme right is Darwin Walton. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 17, 1923

Toonerville trolley

Toonerville trolley

Guided by the accommodating hand of Supt. J.J. Jones, the editor of the Bulletin was conducted through Black Diamond Mine last Friday, May 11, and initiated into the mysteries of digging coal.

Down on the 12th Level, in Chute No. 1, on the South Side, J.D. Walton gave a demonstration of how a pick is used in digging, while up at the face in the gangway some of the boys were busy with a jack hammer, driving the gangway still further along the seam.

At the 11th Level Pete Kurth, cager, was found on the job, busy with the constant string of trips coming and going. Going on up to the 9th, the trip was made on the “Toonerville Trolley”—the auxiliary hoist between the 12th and 7th Levels used until the 12th Level is developed extensively enough to permit the switching of the main trip. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 13, 1904

General Manager Ford ends negotiations in southern city

J.C. Ford

J.C. Ford

Rich coal deposits on C. & P. S. Ry. transferred for $1,000,000

SAN FRANCISCO, Friday, May 13 — J.C. Ford, general manager of the Pacific Coast Company, has been in this city for some days negotiating with President H.H. Taylor for the purchase of the Black Diamond coal mines on Puget Sound.

This afternoon at the office of the Black Diamond Company a representative of The Times was told that the deal had been closed. The price named was $1,000,000. (more…)

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