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Posts Tagged ‘Selleck School’

Originally published in Northwest Nikkei, May 1994

By Ed Suguro

A 1924 photo of the Selleck Japanese community. T.Z.Maekawa is the man in the striped tie with hand in pocket, third row from top; Heiji Sakakibara is the man standing next to him. The Rev. U.G. Murphy is sitting far right third row from bottom. Mr. Abo, the foreman, is sitting in the middle with the baby.

Before World War II there were a number of company sawmill towns like Mukilteo, Snoqualmie, Selleck, Eatonville, National, Onalaska, Walvill, and Longview in which the Issei worked and the Nisei grew up.

Selleck was about 10 miles east of Maple Valley and was recognized by the King County Landmarks Commission as a historical landmark and by the National Register as a historic district. It was a company town in which the Pacific States Lumber Company, one of the largest on the West Coast, employed a number of Issei.

Among those who lived there were T.Z. Maekawa, who worked at the mill, and the Rev. Joseph Sakakibara, who grew up there until high school. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 19, 1979

The above maps shows structural facilities proposed for a Cedar River salmon hatchery near Landsburg. – Courtesy Washington State Department of Fisheries.

The above maps shows structural facilities proposed for a Cedar River salmon hatchery near Landsburg. – Courtesy Washington State Department of Fisheries.

Further plans regarding the expansion of salmon rearing facilities at the Seattle Water Department Park on the Cedar River near Landsburg have been announced by the State Department of Fisheries. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 10, 1979

By George and Dianne Wilson

Bob Kuster, above, is one of six skilled technicians who work very hard to see that the miles of wires and maze of equipment at the central office operate properly for Black Diamond telephone customers. (Voice photo by George Wilson)

Bob Kuster, above, is one of six skilled technicians who work very hard to see that the miles of wires and maze of equipment at the central office operate properly for Black Diamond telephone customers. (Voice photo by George Wilson)

Telephone service may not be as popular a conversational topic as the weather, but when there is a problem with the phone, you can count on hearing about it.

A group of six central office technicians work very hard to see that Black Diamond phone users don’t have trouble. The group serves Black Diamond, Maple Valley, Enumclaw, Buckley, Crystal Mountain, and Lester.

Dave Smith, Erwin Haussler, Frank Wise, George Williams, Owen Bing, and Bob Kuster with Ken Mead, foreman, all do their best to provide good phone service for users in this large area.

Bob Kuster recently took these reporters on a tour of the Pacific Northwest Bell telephone office in Black Diamond, describing the equipment and mechanics involved each time someone picks up their phone. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1994

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

A “love affair” with Selleck was evident at the reunion September 18 at the old grade school. Amandus Carlyle Butcher summed up the emotional attachment to the old sawmill town: “I love this country.”

Butcher went to all the first eight grades in Selleck and said it was the best place in the world to grow up.

His dad built the Kangley tavern in 1927 and ran it until 1932 while working days at the sawmill. Butcher hasn’t moved very far away, residing in Maple Valley. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 2, 1977

By Dianne Wilson

Friendly faculty and co-workers: Front row from left, Barbara Alberts, Nellie Olson, Lois McGreen, Arlene Hubber, Mary Lee Borreson, Barbara Greenhoe. Back row from left, Richard Hubber, Jan Klemann, Maryrose Madder, Julianne McNeeley, Julie Weinbrecht, Patricia Elder, Jack Thomas (principal).

Friendly faculty and co-workers: Front row from left, Barbara Alberts, Nellie Olson, Lois McGreen, Arlene Hubber, Mary Lee Borreson, Barbara Greenhoe. Back row from left, Richard Hubber, Jan Klemann, Maryrose Madder, Julianne McNeeley, Julie Weinbrecht, Patricia Elder, Jack Thomas (principal).

What began as a reporter’s quest for an interesting feature turned into a “nostalgic trip” for me several weeks ago, when I visited the Black Diamond School. It was the first time I had been in an elementary school since my teaching days in Northern California. However, it was a delightful experience. (more…)

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