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Posts Tagged ‘logging’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1906

Pacific Coast Co. and Northern Pacific may come under provisions which prohibit carriers operating plants

Shipments outside Washington forbidden by the operators, but Hill line will me most seriously hurt by rule; Piles made fight to help local industries and Portland coal market to suffer if supply must be cut off

If the House agrees to the amendment made by the United States senate, forbidding common carriers from hauling coal mined in their own properties to points outside the state, the Pacific Coast Company and Northern Pacific will be seriously affected.

It was to save the coal properties of these two lines that United States Senator S.H. Piles is understood to have introduced his amendment exempting lines whose principal business is not that of a common carrier.

Just how this would have helped the Northern Pacific is not clear, but it would have been of some advantage to the Pacific Coast Company. That it was lost is believed by railroad men to have been due to the necessity for regulating the anthracite roads. The Pacific Coast Company can probably escape the provisions of the bill, but it will be a more expensive task to market the coal of that corporation. The Northern Pacific is expected to be compelled to limit its market to this state. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 1997

By Colin McDonald

In January and February of 1938, Bill Iverson and I were hired by the Baldridge Logging Co. to fire their donkey which was located near the top of Taylor Mountain.

I told this to a person who didn’t know anything about logging. I said, “We had to get up early to steam up the donkey before the crew arrived.” He replied, “What did you do? Run him around in a corral?” He thought we were using a four-legged donkey. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 2011

By Barbara Nilson

Front of the Carbonado Saloon built in 1889 and now offering a special Senior Menu on Thursdays.

Every Thursday is Senior Citizen Day at the Carbonado Tavern built in 1889.

The saloon is an inviting place with a favorite niche to the right of the door with a gas stove, round table carved with years of names of thirsty patrons, and the walls covered with reminders of when Carbonado was a mining and logging community starting in 1870. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 15, 1915

Approximately 200,000,000 feet in Cedar River watershed to be disposed of by Board of Public Works

The Board of Public Works yesterday decided to call for bids on approximately 200,000,000 feet of standing timber which the city owns in the Cedar River watershed in the vicinity of Cedar Lake. So far as known, the Pacific States Lumber Company, which has already bargained for about an equal amount of timber now owned by the Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Weyerhaeuser Company, and the United States government, will be the only bidder.

Before the timber is sold the board decided yesterday to submit all bids to the city council, that body to determine whether or not the timber shall be sold at this time at the prices offered. The city tract contains fir, hemlock, and cedar, with a considerable smaller amount of spruce.

The Pacific States Lumber Company desires to secure enough timber in the Cedar River watershed to operate one of its mills for about eight years, by logging 50,000,000 feet a year.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 14, 1976

By D’Ann Pedee

Bicentennial quilt: Thirty Maple Valley women are now putting the finishing touches on a handcrafted quilt as part of their Bicentennial year activities. The thirty patches, some of which are shown above, will depict this area historically, spotlighting some of its past and present. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

How do you place a value on a handcrafted quilt?

Perhaps by the amount of money it can be sold for or by averaging the time and services spent in completing it.

When finished, the Maple Valley Arts Committee could possibly have a three-thousand-dollar product on its hands. That’s the amount of money it is hoped will raised by raffling be of the Bicentennial quilt that thirty local women are in the process of completing. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, April 3, 1908

The Northwest lumber and shingle manufacturers passed a resolution on Monday refusing to put up a second bond for guaranteeing the payment of the new rate pending the decision of the rate controversy. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, September 4, 1930

By J.T. Percival, Jr., resident manager, Enumclaw-Buckley territory

Photo courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, CKK0361, Clark Kinsey photographer, circa 1927

Photo courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, CKK0361, Clark Kinsey photographer, circa 1927

Some three years ago we extended our lines from the coal mining community of Fairfax to the lumbering community of Montezuma, a little more than a mile distant, where we have been furnishing power to the Manley-Moore Lumber Company for the operation of its sawmill.

This mill is a very interesting plant putting out about 18,000 feet per day of eight hours, but its logging operations are even more interesting. It was, therefore, with real pleasure that the invitation of Mr. Moore to visit the camp was accepted. (more…)

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