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Posts Tagged ‘logging’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, September 4, 1930

By J.T. Percival, Jr., resident manager, Enumclaw-Buckley territory

Photo courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, CKK0361, Clark Kinsey photographer, circa 1927

Photo courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, CKK0361, Clark Kinsey photographer, circa 1927

Some three years ago we extended our lines from the coal mining community of Fairfax to the lumbering community of Montezuma, a little more than a mile distant, where we have been furnishing power to the Manley-Moore Lumber Company for the operation of its sawmill.

This mill is a very interesting plant putting out about 18,000 feet per day of eight hours, but its logging operations are even more interesting. It was, therefore, with real pleasure that the invitation of Mr. Moore to visit the camp was accepted. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, July 22, 1992

David Horrocks

David Horrocks

In 1888, David Horrocks’ great-grandfather bought about 100 acres from the Northern Pacific Railroad along what is now Cedar Grove Road. David Horrocks was born on that land, 500 feet from where he and his wife Nancy live today.

During all that time, a fabulous history has developed in the upper Squak valley.

For the last five months, the Horrocks family has been piecing together the history and memories of a time that is lost for most people. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 8, 1934

Woodsmen and deputy sheriffs join in search; 5 aboard Spokane-Seattle craft escape uninjured

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Woodsmen, forest rangers, watershed patrolmen, and Seattle deputy sheriffs today searched through the rain-soaked undergrowth of the Snoqualmie National Forest, thirty miles southeast of Seattle, for Daisy A. Mooney of Winthrop, missing after a United Air Lines plane in which she was a passenger crashed six miles east of Selleck last evening.

She disappeared last evening after a United Air Lines planes, carrying her and five other passengers and a crew of three, crashed in the fog and rain on a mountainside of the high Cascades.

Four persons were injured in the smash, which might have been fatal had it not been for the quick thinking of the pilots and the sturdy construction of the Spokane-to-Seattle plane.

Co-pilot staggers out of wilds

First word of the mishap reached Seattle about 8 o’clock last night when Copilot Dwight Hansen of Spokane, badly injured, staggered out of the wilderness and obtained a rescue party at Selleck. Hansen was taken to Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle.

In addition to Hansen, who is suffering from a probable broken nose, shock, a deep wound in one leg, and many minor cuts and bruises, the injured include:

Pilot Ben Redfield, Spokane, compound fracture of the left arm.

Robert Clarke, Tacoma state liquor inspector, wrenched back.

Miss Helen Curren, cashier for the Great West Life Assurance Company in Seattle, leg injured but believed unbroken. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 18, 1899

The little town of Maple Valley on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad has developed a new industry. It is that of “whiskey peddling.” The people of Maple Valley say that a man named Paul Bassen has been traveling round in that neighborhood with a valet full of whiskey flasks, peddling the fiery liquid out to customers the same way the ordinary peddler sells needles and thread. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 2, 1979

By Kurt HildeBrandt

Maple Valley volunteer firemen have taken on the task of restoring this dilapidated old Howard Cooper engine into the smart, shining vehicle it was when it served Maple Valley back in the early 1950s.

Maple Valley volunteer firemen have taken on the task of restoring this dilapidated old Howard Cooper engine into the smart, shining vehicle it was when it served Maple Valley back in the early 1950s.

Many hours of volunteer work by members of the Maple Valley Volunteer Fire Fighters Association will be involved before the old 1926 Howard Cooper can be restored to the polished original condition by which it was known when it served as Maple Valley’s first fire engine back in the early 1950s.

When restoration has been completed, hopefully by 1981, the old fire truck should be a source of pride and historical significance to the entire greater Maple Valley community. (more…)

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