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Posts Tagged ‘logging’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 18, 1899

The little town of Maple Valley on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad has developed a new industry. It is that of “whiskey peddling.” The people of Maple Valley say that a man named Paul Bassen has been traveling round in that neighborhood with a valet full of whiskey flasks, peddling the fiery liquid out to customers the same way the ordinary peddler sells needles and thread. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 2, 1979

By Kurt HildeBrandt

Maple Valley volunteer firemen have taken on the task of restoring this dilapidated old Howard Cooper engine into the smart, shining vehicle it was when it served Maple Valley back in the early 1950s.

Maple Valley volunteer firemen have taken on the task of restoring this dilapidated old Howard Cooper engine into the smart, shining vehicle it was when it served Maple Valley back in the early 1950s.

Many hours of volunteer work by members of the Maple Valley Volunteer Fire Fighters Association will be involved before the old 1926 Howard Cooper can be restored to the polished original condition by which it was known when it served as Maple Valley’s first fire engine back in the early 1950s.

When restoration has been completed, hopefully by 1981, the old fire truck should be a source of pride and historical significance to the entire greater Maple Valley community. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1996

Dear Bugle and Maple Valley Historical Society:
I might be able to give a little more history of Maple Valley and Hobart. Hobart was where the Sidebothams finally homesteaded or staked their claim to live.

I am not sure who came into the area first, Sidebothams or Peacocks—a few generations passed before it got to me. I would be the last to carry the Sidebotham name until my sons came along. I married Erma Lissman, graduate of Renton High School and a native of Roundup, Montana. We have four grown kids. I moved from Hobart fourteen miles to Kennydale.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Hobart and Maple Valley were just four miles apart, then (going east) came the town of Taylor. The town of Kerriston was the last little settlement or community in the timber.

Hobart thrived on logging. Wood & Iverson had a sawmill, a company store, and a bunkhouse that housed (board and room) about 100 loggers. There were three rows of company houses for loggers and families to live in. Many people had a little stump ranch with a few livestock, worked at the mill or logging camp, and went to Alaska for the fishing season for salmon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, December 27, 1923

The new logging camp at Lake Peterson has been making fast progress in their logging executions

The new logging camp at Lake Peterson has been making rapid strides lately in putting into execution their logging operations.

Mr. Wilson, who is managing the new camp, purchased a number of ties from Mr. Green, of the Hideaway Cash Store, and has extended Sandstrom Spur five hundred feet, giving loading accommodations for 60,000 feet a day.

They have two large donkeys, one at the woods and the other at the spur. They are laying the foundation for the loading stand.

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, December 14, 1922

C.M. Drake erects mill here with a capacity of 5,000 feet per day—hardwood will be turned out

Maple and alder lumber will be manufactured in Maplevalley soon. The new sawmill, which has been installed on W.D. Gibbon’s place below the depot by C.M. Drake and Son, will be put in operation as soon as the weather permits.

The mill has a capacity of about 5,000 feet a day, states Mr. Drake.

Logging operations will be conducted by private individuals who will also deliver the logs to the mill. Several contracts have already been entered into.

The finished product will be shipped to Seattle, San Francisco, and other points by rail.

Mr. Drake formerly operated a shingle mill near Peterson Lake on the pipe line.

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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