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Posts Tagged ‘logging’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1922

Green River mill at Baldi completely destroyed

Pacific States Company loses three outfits, thousands in railway equipment

Forest fire damage to the Pacific States Lumber Company, both at Selleck and Cedar Falls, was increased overnight with the loss last night of Camp No. 18 at Cedar Falls. This makes three logging camps lost by the company, including all the bridges on eleven miles of railway, a coal bunker, twelve donkey engines, fifteen freight cars, a section camp, an enormous amount of fallen timber, and several cars of logs. Two small residences at Selleck also burned last night. Today there was virtually no wind around the company’s territory and it was reported the fire situation was getting under control. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 6, 1917

Pacific States Lumber Company wants to purchase material that will take years to log

That an offer will be made to the city of Seattle to purchase about 100,000,000 feet of standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, at a price of approximately $1,000,000, has been known to various city officials for several days, as a part of the general plan of the Pacific States Lumber Company to begin logging operations that will extend over a period of several years. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 27, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The families of Hobart pioneers, Rudolph and Julie (Gradishnick) Grady and Olga (Grady) and Rudy Petchnick, will be featured at the Sunday, April 15th reunion at the Hobart Community Church, at 1:30 p.m. The program is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 7, 1984

Coal mining plan faces opposition

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

Bill Kombol, manager of Palmer Coking Coal Co. in Black Diamond, stands amid a stand of Douglas fir trees on reclaimed land that was part of the McKay Surface Mine in 1974-1976. The pit mine was dug as deep as 40 feet in some places to reach coal. Richard S. Hevza/Seattle Times

Douglas firs ranging from a foot to 10 feet high grow branchtip to branchtip along two narrow strips of generally clear land near Black Diamond.

A few short years ago these same corridors, hewn out of second- and third-growth forest, were sliced open to extract black diamonds—coal. The open ugly sores were the Palmer Coking Coal Company’s McKay and Gem Surface Mines. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 23, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The town of Fairfax, declared the “prettiest mining town around,” showing the turn-table at the extreme right above center. Mine buildings are in front and the school is on the left. Carbon River runs through the trees at the top or the photo. (Original copy from Mr. and Mrs. Tony Basselli.) Photo courtesy of Steve Meitzler, Heritage Quest Press, Orting, WA., publisher of the book, Carbon River Coal Country.

Riding the Northern Pacific Railroad to the upper end of the Carbon River Canyon or tooling along to Mount Rainier in a Model T, tourists would pass close to three mining towns: Melmont, Fairfax, and Montezuma.

First, beyond Carbonado, was Melmont, situated between the Carbon River and the NPR line. A bridge spanning the Carbon River ran between the company hotel and the saloon with the depot and school on the hillside above. On the left end of the bridge was the road connecting to Fairfax. This bridge was nearly a little beyond the high bridge which spans the canyon today. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 10, 1906

Information secured by Milwaukee railroad from engineering crews now indicates that route is best

Surveyors kept in the mountains and are continuing investigations of all possible means of reaching coast

Heavy snows retarding final examination and definite announcement cannot be made until all reports are in

The Milwaukee railroad will use, according to indications, Snoqualmie Pass in crossing the Cascade Mountains, entering Seattle by way of the Cedar River Valley. If this route is finally accepted by the Milwaukee the new transcontinental line will parallel the Columbia & Puget Sound from Maple Valley into Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 31, 1925

Every miner at Black Diamond probably knows the three men whose likenesses appear above. If there is one who doesn’t, he should. They represent the three phases of coal mining most vital to the industry; efficiency and economy in operation, safety inspection, and first aid and mine rescue training.

In Supt. Paul Gallagher largely rests the success or failure of the mine’s operation. Closely related is the safety inspection, directed by Deputy State Mine Inspector, Geo. T. Wake, under the able supervision of Wm. R. Reese, Chief Inspector. And last but not least is John G. Schoning, of the United States Bureau of Mines, who patiently drills the men in the principles of first aid and mine rescue work. All three indispensable. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September and December 2006

By Barbara Nilson

JoAnn (Weibling) Klacson and Lois (Kelley) Bartholomew on a July visit to the MVHS museum. —Photo by Sherrie Acker

In July, JoAnn Weibling Klacsan visited the historical society’s Third Floor Museum, accompanied by her niece, Diane Lee Weibling, and chatted with Dick Peacock and Sherrie Acker about Kerriston. Neighbors of them were the Kelley girls, so Lois (Kelley) Bartholomew joined them at the museum to share memories.

The conversation was taped and part of it follows. In addition, Lois graciously, with a little arm twisting, allowed me to use part of the story she has written about growing up in Kerriston.

Klacsan recalled that all the houses in Kerriston in 1923 had underpinnings, and were all built on a side hill. “We had a porch with a lot of stairs and a nice view. The houses were shacks, all the same about 16′ x 18′. Close to the school there was a set of wooden steps that went down to the level below and us kids used to run down those steps.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2005

By Barbara Nilson

In February of 1952 this group posed outside the Maple Valley Tavern in front of Bea and Bill Smith's logging truck. They are: Pat Iverson, Harold Heflinger, Darlene Thompson, Bea and Bill Smith, Marie Loveck, and George Hale. — Photo from Christine (Paris) Norheim to Sherrie Acker.

In February of 1952 this group posed outside the Maple Valley Tavern in front of Bea and Bill Smith’s logging truck. They are: Pat Iverson, Harold Heflinger, Darlene Thompson, Bea and Bill Smith, Marie Loveck, and George Hale. — Photo from Christine (Paris) Norheim to Sherrie Acker.

Recently Christine (Paris) Norheim of Enumclaw was cleaning out her house preparing to move when she came across a small book of prints labeled, “These photos were taken in Feb. of 1952 in front of the Maple Valley Tavern.” She called Sherrie Acker, the niece of the owner of the tavern, Claude Bowman, and presented her with them. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 4, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

The Tahoma baseball team of 1940 was largely made up of Ravensdale residents. They are: (front row) Gino Tedesco, Frank Primozich, Bob Lang, Gene Collins, Wally Habenicht, unknown, and Larry Krall; (second row) Otto Moore, coach; Frank Pooleskie and Louie Wallace; (back row) Frank Pichinini, Walt Olsen, Charles Fore, Kal Tantari, Bill Sweeney, Ed Kuhuski, and Tommy Lee — Photo compliments of the Maple Valley Historical Society

Memories will be flying fast and furious, Sunday, Sept. 15, as folks gather for the annual Ravensdale Reunion, 1 p.m., at the Maple Valley Community Center, corner of Witte Road S.E. and S.E. 248th St. The reunion is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

No program is planned for the afternoon, just a chance to get-together over a cup of coffee and visit, share introductions and a tale or two over the open mic. (more…)

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