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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, May 1999

By Margie Markus

Some things we remember about Selleck. I gathered some of my information from articles I have on Selleck. Some came from my memories and my mother’s memories (Eva Litras).

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

Growing up as a little girl I lived at Elkcoal (mining town). It was about five miles from the town of Selleck.

I have many fond memories of growing up in that area and going to school at Selleck grade school which had first to the eighth grade, and then to Enumclaw to high school.

The original schoolhouse suffered a devastating fire in 1929. It was rebuilt in 1930 on the same site and is currently being used as an office and shop. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1910

Period of greatest danger passed, through spectacular and successful work of fighting forces

Departments conflict on firing great guns

William Entwistle’s force risks death in mad race to Maple Valley with auto load of dynamite

The forest fire story in brief

Two bad fires break out near standing timber reserves, King County. Forest supervisors take 200 men into woods but fail to control conflagrations.

Blaze in young timber near Scenic Hot Springs breaks all bounds and is beyond control. Forest supervisor in charge.

Town of Walsh, on Columbia & Puget Sound, badly scorched, loss including one saloon, two-story dwelling house, barn, and buildings of England’s logging camp.

Dynamite to the amount of 500 pounds taken into Maple Valley district by fire fighters, who prepare to dynamite tops of trees in old timber to stop destructive fires.

Cooler weather makes work of forest fire workers easier, but danger will continue until rains fall.

The town of Bothell, at the head of Lake Washington, which was in danger of destruction yesterday, is reported safe. No buildings were destroyed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 22, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930, now serves as the Pacific States Condominiums. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

At the end the Kent-Kangley Road east of Maple Valley is the mill town of Selleck, which still exists today; next door was the town of Lavender, or “Jap Town.” The mill is gone, but the school is still there and about 16 of the original houses. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 9, 2014

By Bill Kombol

Lake Sawyer log dump, 1928. Courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, C. Kinsey No. 1684

Lake Sawyer log dump, 1928

This photo by Clark Kinsey shows one of the log dumps of the Lake Sawyer Mill Company, circa 1928. This log dump facility was located on the west shore of Lake Sawyer at the current site of the Sunrise Lake Sawyer Resort. This old log dump is now a short peninsula at the resort which juts out into the lake. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 13, 1887

Posing proudly with the tools of their trade in this photograph of about 1888 were workers at the Ames & Russell sawmill in Maple Valley. Standing from left were C.O. Russell, Lot Davis, Arthur Russell, Charles Valentine, Nat Shumar and Arthur Cleveland. Seated, left, was Fred Migel with George Russell, now of Puyallup, beside him.

Posing proudly with the tools of their trade in this photograph of about 1888 were workers at the Ames & Russell sawmill in Maple Valley. Standing from left were C.O. Russell, Lot Davis, Arthur Russell, Charles Valentine, Nat Shumar and Arthur Cleveland. Seated, left, was Fred Migel with George Russell, now of Puyallup, beside him.

The logging industry in the heart of the county has of late been receiving some attention. A few months ago George Ames put in a camp at Maple Valley post office, at the fourth crossing of Cedar River, on the Cedar River extension of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, and is now getting out about 10,000 feet of logs a day. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 30, 1940

The stubborn fire near Hobart, twenty-five miles east of Seattle, which is believed to have been set by a firebug early last week, burned on unabated last night over an area of almost 1,800 acres of cutover land while weary crews battled to keep it within present confines.

Immediately threatened are the huge stands of virgin timber near and on Seattle’s Cedar River watershed. The flames licked their way into this first-growth timber in several spots late yesterday and only by hard work were the crews able to check their spread. (more…)

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