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Posts Tagged ‘logging’

Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1996

Dear Bugle and Maple Valley Historical Society:
I might be able to give a little more history of Maple Valley and Hobart. Hobart was where the Sidebothams finally homesteaded or staked their claim to live.

I am not sure who came into the area first, Sidebothams or Peacocks—a few generations passed before it got to me. I would be the last to carry the Sidebotham name until my sons came along. I married Erma Lissman, graduate of Renton High School and a native of Roundup, Montana. We have four grown kids. I moved from Hobart fourteen miles to Kennydale.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Hobart and Maple Valley were just four miles apart, then (going east) came the town of Taylor. The town of Kerriston was the last little settlement or community in the timber.

Hobart thrived on logging. Wood & Iverson had a sawmill, a company store, and a bunkhouse that housed (board and room) about 100 loggers. There were three rows of company houses for loggers and families to live in. Many people had a little stump ranch with a few livestock, worked at the mill or logging camp, and went to Alaska for the fishing season for salmon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, December 27, 1923

The new logging camp at Lake Peterson has been making fast progress in their logging executions

The new logging camp at Lake Peterson has been making rapid strides lately in putting into execution their logging operations.

Mr. Wilson, who is managing the new camp, purchased a number of ties from Mr. Green, of the Hideaway Cash Store, and has extended Sandstrom Spur five hundred feet, giving loading accommodations for 60,000 feet a day.

They have two large donkeys, one at the woods and the other at the spur. They are laying the foundation for the loading stand.

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, December 14, 1922

C.M. Drake erects mill here with a capacity of 5,000 feet per day—hardwood will be turned out

Maple and alder lumber will be manufactured in Maplevalley soon. The new sawmill, which has been installed on W.D. Gibbon’s place below the depot by C.M. Drake and Son, will be put in operation as soon as the weather permits.

The mill has a capacity of about 5,000 feet a day, states Mr. Drake.

Logging operations will be conducted by private individuals who will also deliver the logs to the mill. Several contracts have already been entered into.

The finished product will be shipped to Seattle, San Francisco, and other points by rail.

Mr. Drake formerly operated a shingle mill near Peterson Lake on the pipe line.

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, October 1994

The Lazor “children” out by the barn at the family farm on 208th. Seated are John and Mike Lazar and Mary Pilat. At back is Betty Lazor, Vince’s widow.

The Lazor “children” out by the barn at the family farm on 208th. Seated are John and Mike Lazar and Mary Pilat. At back is Betty Lazor, Vince’s widow.

Memories of the “old days” were flying fast on September 11 as generations of the Michael and Veronica Lazor family gathered with friends and neighbors at the former family farm on 208th Street.

The present owners, Paul and Gayle Kness, who purchased the farm in 1981, graciously welcomed some 40 Lazor descendants and former neighbors such as the Kralls and Junevitches for the reunion.

The three oldest Lazor children, Mary, Mike, and Johnny, were all present at the reunion. They were born in Taylor in the early 1900s. In 1914 they moved into the house their folks built on the 20-acre farm, where the youngest child, Vincent, was born. The farm was first sold in 1969 to the McDermand family. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, May 1999

By Margie Markus

Some things we remember about Selleck. I gathered some of my information from articles I have on Selleck. Some came from my memories and my mother’s memories (Eva Litras).

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

This school was destroyed by fire on December 31, 1929. (Photo courtesy of Art Van Bergeyk.) The “new” Selleck School was built in 1930 on the same site.

Growing up as a little girl I lived at Elkcoal (mining town). It was about five miles from the town of Selleck.

I have many fond memories of growing up in that area and going to school at Selleck grade school which had first to the eighth grade, and then to Enumclaw to high school.

The original schoolhouse suffered a devastating fire in 1929. It was rebuilt in 1930 on the same site and is currently being used as an office and shop. (more…)

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