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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific States Lumber Co.’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 26, 1917

The Pacific States Lumber Company recently purchased approximately 400,000,000 feet of timber from the Northern Pacific Railway Company, situated in the vicinity of Cedar Lake, and will bid not only for the city timber but the timber on government property to be acquired for watershed purposes by the city.

All of the timber in the watershed, should the sale take place, will be logged under such sanitary regulations as may be promulgated by the health and sanitation department, and certain term of years will be allowed in which to remove all timber.

The coast of timber in the Cedar River watershed, as well as land, has been a charge against the water fund, and the revenues of the sale now proposed will be converted into that fund and used for extension purposes and betterments to the system.

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Originally published in Northwest Nikkei, May 1994

By Ed Suguro

A 1924 photo of the Selleck Japanese community. T.Z.Maekawa is the man in the striped tie with hand in pocket, third row from top; Heiji Sakakibara is the man standing next to him. The Rev. U.G. Murphy is sitting far right third row from bottom. Mr. Abo, the foreman, is sitting in the middle with the baby.

Before World War II there were a number of company sawmill towns like Mukilteo, Snoqualmie, Selleck, Eatonville, National, Onalaska, Walvill, and Longview in which the Issei worked and the Nisei grew up.

Selleck was about 10 miles east of Maple Valley and was recognized by the King County Landmarks Commission as a historical landmark and by the National Register as a historic district. It was a company town in which the Pacific States Lumber Company, one of the largest on the West Coast, employed a number of Issei.

Among those who lived there were T.Z. Maekawa, who worked at the mill, and the Rev. Joseph Sakakibara, who grew up there until high school. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 15, 1915

Approximately 200,000,000 feet in Cedar River watershed to be disposed of by Board of Public Works

The Board of Public Works yesterday decided to call for bids on approximately 200,000,000 feet of standing timber which the city owns in the Cedar River watershed in the vicinity of Cedar Lake. So far as known, the Pacific States Lumber Company, which has already bargained for about an equal amount of timber now owned by the Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Weyerhaeuser Company, and the United States government, will be the only bidder.

Before the timber is sold the board decided yesterday to submit all bids to the city council, that body to determine whether or not the timber shall be sold at this time at the prices offered. The city tract contains fir, hemlock, and cedar, with a considerable smaller amount of spruce.

The Pacific States Lumber Company desires to secure enough timber in the Cedar River watershed to operate one of its mills for about eight years, by logging 50,000,000 feet a year.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, April 12, 1914

Rebuilt sawmill costs $200,00

New plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., will begin operations June 1

Rebuilt plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., to be opened June 1.

On the site of its old plant at Selleck, Wash., which was destroyed by fire last January 3, the Pacific States Lumber Company has just completed the building of a new sawmill at a cost of about $200,000. Work now is in progress installing the machinery, and it is expected to have the mill in operation June 1, with the capacity force of 350 men. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1994

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

A “love affair” with Selleck was evident at the reunion September 18 at the old grade school. Amandus Carlyle Butcher summed up the emotional attachment to the old sawmill town: “I love this country.”

Butcher went to all the first eight grades in Selleck and said it was the best place in the world to grow up.

His dad built the Kangley tavern in 1927 and ran it until 1932 while working days at the sawmill. Butcher hasn’t moved very far away, residing in Maple Valley. (more…)

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