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Posts Tagged ‘barber shop’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 18, 1926

Though the men who dig the coal seldom see it after it leaves the mine, they know that the product of their labor will go to warm the homes of many cities and towns. This picture shows one of the Ford delivery trucks of the Pacific Coast Coal Company from which is being delivered a load of Newcastle Lump. This truck is designed for quick and light deliveries and is able to haul its load anywhere that a car can be driven. (more…)

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Originally published in the News Journal, January 23, 1980

Story and photos by Bruce Rommel

Black Diamond sits nestled in the western foothills of the Cascades.

Once hundreds of men worked the strip mines, producing coal, the “black diamond” which powered the railroads, fueled industry, and heated our homes.

Walking the quiet streets of Black Diamond today, one finds only the reminders of those days when this community was a booming company town.

Nestled in the western foothills of the Cascades, Black Diamond and nearby Franklin once boasted a population of more than 5,000. All that remains of Franklin today are a few house foundations scattered along hillsides. And in 1979 Black Diamond is a town with about 1,100 residents, about 50 less citizens than a decade ago. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 27, 1925

These handsome gentlemen run the stores. From left to right, upper row, they are C.T. Paulson of Carbonado, H.W. Doust of Newcastle, Malcolm McPhee, purchasing agent; lower row, L.W. Foreman of Burnett, H.M. McDowell of Black Diamond, and E.F. De Grandpre, Manager of Miscellaneous Operations. This picture shows them working hard at a business meeting.

Mr. McPhee buys the goods, the store managers sell them, and Mr. De Grandpre gets all the money. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 13, 1925

Probably the deepest beneath the earth’s surface at which a radio test was ever made, representatives of the Radio Corporation of America and Sherman, Clay Co., of Seattle, with officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, recently attempted to log Seattle broadcasting stations from the 12th level of Black Diamond mine. (more…)

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Originally published in Northwest Nikkei, May 1994

By Ed Suguro

A 1924 photo of the Selleck Japanese community. T.Z.Maekawa is the man in the striped tie with hand in pocket, third row from top; Heiji Sakakibara is the man standing next to him. The Rev. U.G. Murphy is sitting far right third row from bottom. Mr. Abo, the foreman, is sitting in the middle with the baby.

Before World War II there were a number of company sawmill towns like Mukilteo, Snoqualmie, Selleck, Eatonville, National, Onalaska, Walvill, and Longview in which the Issei worked and the Nisei grew up.

Selleck was about 10 miles east of Maple Valley and was recognized by the King County Landmarks Commission as a historical landmark and by the National Register as a historic district. It was a company town in which the Pacific States Lumber Company, one of the largest on the West Coast, employed a number of Issei.

Among those who lived there were T.Z. Maekawa, who worked at the mill, and the Rev. Joseph Sakakibara, who grew up there until high school. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 12, 1895

And so an arrest follows

A nice question for Justice Caldwell to investigate—Thomas’ reason for refusing was not a question of color—Mason’s statement

Barber Al Thomas, who runs the O.K. barber shop on Yesler Avenue, north side, which sits in the right of way of the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad, refused to shave David Mason, a colored miner from Franklin, and the latter has had Thomas arrested. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 26, 1924

Diamond Briquets were recently given wide and favorable publicity in Juneau, Alaska, when Harold Lloyd appeared in the film feature, Why Worry, at one of the Juneau theatres. H.G. Walmsley, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s depot at the Alaskan capital, arranged with the exhibitors of this picture to place fifteen of these 16-foot signs about the city.

Dealers handling Diamond Briquets, from Skagway, Alaska, in the north, to Hornbrook, California, in the south, all report no worries with this popular fuel. (more…)

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