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Posts Tagged ‘fire boss’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 9, 1923

If hard work and persistent effort is worth anything at all, the Black Diamond Mine Rescue and First Aid Team, under the leadership of Capt. B.F. Snook, is going to be a real contender for honors at the big inter-camp meet in Newcastle on August 18. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 26, 1923

Though off to a late start, the aggregation of baseball ability shown above is now winning honors for Black Diamond and before the season ends is confident there will be few teams with a higher figure in the percentage column.

These are the boys who gave Newcastle a close run for their money on the Fourth of July and the line-up which will cross bats with Burnett next Sunday.

The line-up of the team includes: Chambers, ss; Kertis, 2b; Garcey, 3b; Bowen, c; Hydorn p; Wasmund, 1b; Connell, lf; Maroni, cf; Rockey, rf. Jack Kravagna, in front, is the mascot, and the man with the straw hat is Bert Arthur, team manager. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 19, 1923

Another instance of what is being done constantly all over the Northwest to sell the products of the Pacific Coast Coal Company mines is shown in the cut above. This shows a booth arranged by the Pacific Coast Coal agency in Everett at a Household Appliance Show a short time ago.

Note the slogan, “We Can Make It Hot for You,” and below the grate filled with burning Diamond Briquets. In a briquet guessing contest conducted by the company in connection with the exhibit, more than 1,800 contestants entered, most of who made good prospects for business. Charles O. Hilen is the manager of the Everett agency. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 24, 1923

Every mine has its firebosses, but Newcastle is willing to stack its supervisory force against that of any other mine in the world, confident of winning first honors anywhere. To back up their boasts they present herewith the photograph of a group taken recently, most of whom had just come off shift. From left to right they are:

A. Elmer Anderson, Dick Richards, Mine Foreman Chas. Lumley, John Eck, Joe Daler, Wm. Bowie, and W.E. Jones. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 5, 1923

burnett-firebossesAnyone having an idea that the firebosses and other supervisory officials at Burnett Mine are a bunch of lounge lizards and pink tea hounds with nothing to do but check in on the job and stick around until the whistle blows each day, should be on hand when the day shift comes off.

With the help of Supt. Bob Simpson, the Bulletin photographer last week rounded up the firebosses and foremen as they came off the day shift from underground, and the photograph shown above is proof positive that they’re a bunch of hard hitters. (more…)

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The Coal Miners’ Honor Garden on the grounds of the Black Diamond Museum memorializes the more than 1,100 coal miners who lost their lives in Washington State.

The Coal Miners’ Honor Garden on the grounds of the Black Diamond Museum memorializes the more than 1,100 coal miners who lost their lives in Washington State.

John Lopan, age 38, married, wife and three children; occupation, miner; nationality, Austrian; was fatally injured on above date, succumbing from his injuries at the Providence Hospital, Seattle, where he was taken immediately after the accident. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 11, 1923

bill-cushingIf there’s any trio in the camp of Burnett any better known than the three shown above, the Bulletin would like to meet them. By way of introduction, in case there are some who don’t know them, we would have you meet, from left to right, Maude, Bill, and Tom.

W.J. “Bill” Cushing is the coal driver for the camp and the representative of Zone “F” in the Mine Council. He is also president of the Burnett Social Club and active in all activities of the camp. (more…)

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