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Posts Tagged ‘fire boss’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 14, 1926

This Link-Belt moveable crane is used at the Briquet Plant not only to load Diamond Briquets from the storage platform into the cars, but also to load coal from the storage piles into cars preparatory to sending it through the plant. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 3, 1925

I’m a coal miner for the same reason that you’re in business. To make a living.

Work in a coal mine is preferable to a job out-of-doors. Neither heat nor cold affect me, and the hazard is less than in railroading or window-washing.

I want my family to live in an American community, where American ideals prevail; where modern schools, churches, and a wholesome community spirit are present.

I want to work where there is not constant friction between employer and employee; where I can get fair play and a square deal.

In the coal mines, the state has one of its greatest natural resources. I want to help develop this industry; that commerce and manufacturing may prosper, and to keep this state free of a foreign fuel dependence.

Work in the coal mines of Washington gives me an opportunity to contribute to the upbuilding of the Pacific Northwest. I spend my money here for food, for clothes, automobiles and radios. You buy the coal which I mine and I’ll continue to add to your wealth as you promote my prosperity.

R.J. Miller
Newcastle coal miner

Washington coal mines expend more than twenty million dollars annually for payrolls and supplies! (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 24, 1925

Though these men are not on jury duty no court could find a more impartial nor fair-minded group than the Black Diamond supervisors shown in the accompanying halftone. For confirmation of this statement just ask any miner or workman employed at the mine. The group, from left to right, includes, Jack Emmanuel, Richard Parry, Tom Edwards, E.D. Rockey, and Robt. Cruickshank. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 4, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

The Tahoma baseball team of 1940 was largely made up of Ravensdale residents. They are: (front row) Gino Tedesco, Frank Primozich, Bob Lang, Gene Collins, Wally Habenicht, unknown, and Larry Krall; (second row) Otto Moore, coach; Frank Pooleskie and Louie Wallace; (back row) Frank Pichinini, Walt Olsen, Charles Fore, Kal Tantari, Bill Sweeney, Ed Kuhuski, and Tommy Lee — Photo compliments of the Maple Valley Historical Society

Memories will be flying fast and furious, Sunday, Sept. 15, as folks gather for the annual Ravensdale Reunion, 1 p.m., at the Maple Valley Community Center, corner of Witte Road S.E. and S.E. 248th St. The reunion is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

No program is planned for the afternoon, just a chance to get-together over a cup of coffee and visit, share introductions and a tale or two over the open mic. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 3, 1925

This is Supt. Simon Ash’s fiery steed, Flyer. It and its fellows hauled the coal trips in the mines of Western Washington before electric haulage came in.

Engineer-fireman Norman Stevenson and conductor-brakeman-flagman-switchman Tom Dodd do, or would, take turns lifting her back on the track when, as, and if she hopped off, they’re that strong and determined.

The Flyer was cold for years until she was fired up recently for yard duty to take the place of a storage-battery locomotive that went inside on development work. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 30, 1925

No feature of the First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet held last Saturday at Black Diamond attracted more attention than the exhibition in first aid and resuscitation work put on by the midget teams from Newcastle and Black Diamond. So far as is known, these two teams are the youngest First Aid teams in the world.

Fathers of the boys are miners employed by the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and the interest displayed by the youngsters is indicative of the efforts put forth by everyone to make mining safe. Members of the Newcastle team, in the front row, include Ernie Bahr, Howard Cotterill, Donald Gilbert, Clyde Joughlin, John Young, and Wm. Schuirman.

The Black Diamond boys, in the back row, are Elmon Rouse, John Gallagher, Harold Lloyd, Jr., Benny Hughes, Oliver Rouse, Jimmy Nicholson, and Ellis Ash. Harold Lloyd, Sr., trained the Black Diamond team and Wm. Jones was the instructor for the Newcastle lads. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 16, 1925

First prize was awarded the Keithly Wood & Coal Company of Everett for the best industrial float in the Fourth of July parade in the Snohomish County metropolis. The Keithly Wood & Coal Company is the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s branch in Everett, and last year also won first prize in the parade. Six dappled grey horses drew the attractive float shown above, while the four young ladies garbed in black and white costumes danced before “Old King Coal” and his diminutive aides. Diamond Briquets and Black Diamond Lump were emphasized in the general design and decorations. C.O. Hilen is the manager of the company’s Everett agency. (more…)

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