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Posts Tagged ‘Krain Corner’

Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2013

By Ken Jensen

A business sign means more than just hanging out the proverbial “shingle.” There’s always a story.

Case in point. On the cover we find the KoernersJohn and Walt—posing in front of their drug store in 1925. One of the signs on the building is for United Cigar Stores Co.

Turns out that cigar franchise was a real boon for the Koerners—and for Black Diamond, too—as John Koerner reported in the September 1922 Pacific Coast Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

By Brenda Sexton

Nearly every day at the Krain Corner Inn, owner Karen Hatch gets a history lesson.

Through the 22 years she’s owned the restaurant at the corner of State Route 169 and Southeast 400th Street, she’s collected newspaper articles, photographs and saved the personal letters folks have written about their visit to the historic building and the area of Krain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

krain-coverBy Brenda Sexton

There was a time when the Plateau was covered with bustling, individual communities.

Most had their own school house, community or dance hall and store. They may have had a church, saloon or specialty shop. Most had a band or baseball team. Some had both.

They were filled with farmers, miners and loggers, most arriving from Europe.

Each community had its own heart and soul.

Those areas still serve as reference points for those who live in the Enumclaw area. Ask many today where they live and chances are they will answer with names like Veazie, Osceola, Wabash, Selleck, Birch, Franklin, Flensted, Cumberland, Boise and Krain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2013

By Frank Hammock

Restaurants in historic buildings dish up heaping helpings of hospitality

Koerner’s Drug, 1925, now Black Diamond Pizza & Deli. (Courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis negative number 48373.)

Koerner’s Drug, 1925, now Black Diamond Pizza & Deli. (Courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis negative number 48373.)

In and around our community, several restaurants that reside in historic buildings have stood the test of time and rouse an interest in our area’s colorful past.

Many businesses have come and gone, but the buildings remain and continue to warm the hearts of those in search of a pinch of nostalgia with a dash of modern charm. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January and April 2006

By Frank Hammock

The best of friends: Dr. Ulman and Mr. Kranc

The best of friends: Dr. Ulman and Mr. Kranc

Have you ever taken a two-hour trip into the past to a forgotten era of time? A trip like this is a lot like visiting a grandparent, or a childhood friend who gladly shares the warmth of memories and fun. I had the pleasurable experience to do just that when I recently paid a visit to two long time Enumclaw residents, Dr. John Ulman and Mr. George Kranc, who shared with me their stories of the past that owe some of their humble beginnings to the early days of Black Diamond not long after the turn of the 20th century.

The interview took place in Dr. Ulman’s quiet and well-manicured residence only two blocks from his childhood home in the heart of Enumclaw. Outside, trees stood in somber silence sporting beautifully colored red, yellow, and brown leaves, and rain fell steadily in the gray daylight hours of an autumn afternoon in November. A light wind rustled up the fallen leaves as the conversations began in the dining area with occasional laughter breaking out of the stories from a lifetime of golden memories that flowed like honey from the vine.

(more…)

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