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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 1914

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922There appears to have been some misunderstanding in regard to the Bulletin’s article last month, on the subject of the Eight Hour Day, because a ten hour day was used to illustrate our point that the wage earner suffers most by a reduction of the working hours. Some of our readers appear to have gained the impression that the company was advocating a ten hour day. A ten hour day was used in the illustration only because the sum of 10 is easier to figure with than 8.

The management of the Pacific Coast Coal Company is not in favor of a ten hour day. It is satisfied with the present eight hour working day, but is opposed to any further reduction of the working hours.

There has been much agitation in regard to an eight hour bank to bank day, which would mean, in reality, seven working hours. In many cases even shorter working days have been advocated by various alleged friends of labor. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 20, 1922

By Harry J. Scott

Miners' tagsBlack Diamond, under Supt. Jones, is continuing to give vigorous attention to all matters affecting safety conditions in the mine. On July 10, a meeting was held of the Safety and Educational Board of the camp, at which many problems coming under this head were taken up and disposed of.

Mr. Gomer Evans brought out the fact that considerable confusion and trouble was being experienced in checking the men out of the bottom.

A means to remedy this condition was sought, and at Mr. Evans’ suggestion, hereafter two of the fire bosses will stay down to do the checking out, one to call off the numbers and the other to see that the men answer correctly and get on the trip in their proper turn.

The chairman called on each member present for suggestions along Safety and Educational lines, and asked that each member try and have a suggestion to offer at our next meeting.

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 19, 1989

By D’Ann Tedford

The plaque, before it was stolen, read: Early Maple Valley Businesses—Maxwell Road was the location of several hotels, a blacksmith shop, a barber shop, grocery stores, a sawmill, and many places where illegal whiskey was sold.

The plaque, before it was stolen, read: Early Maple Valley Businesses—Maxwell Road was the location of several hotels, a blacksmith shop, a barber shop, grocery stores, a sawmill, and many places where illegal whiskey was sold.

Hobart was Shangri-La and Maple Valley was a going concern according to old-timers who gathered recently to witness Puget Sound Power and Light Company’s historical gifts to the two communities.

On behalf of Puget Power, manager Dennis Lensgrav presented two brass plaques which have been mounted on oversized boulders. The boulders, each surrounded by a garden area, are placed in historically significant locations.

At the Maple Valley location (along Maxwell Road at the Practical Pantry parking area) Senior Citizen Joe Mezzavilla recalled early-days Maple Valley where hotels were a common sight.

The plaque there reads: Early Maple Valley Businesses—Maxwell Road was the location of several hotels, a blacksmith shop, a barber shop, grocery stores, a sawmill, and many places where illegal whiskey was sold.” Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 12, 1989

Hobart, Maple Valley (stolen), Ravensdale, and Selleck.

Hobart, Maple Valley (stolen), Ravensdale, and Selleck.

Puget Sound Power and Light Company is in the process of presenting Washington Centennial historical plaques to the Maple Valley, Ravensdale, Selleck, and Hobart communities at dedication ceremonies at these locations.

Last Saturday, July 8, [1989,] local residents were to have taken part in the dedications scheduled in Maple Valley and Hobart.

This coming Saturday, July 15, [1989,] dedications are planned in Ravensdale at 10 a.m. and in Selleck at 11 a.m. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 13, 1922

Briquet Plant Conveyor Belt - 1922The Briquet Plant is working steadily these days. It is aiming at an average of 300 tons every twenty-four hours, and expects to achieve it soon, according to Supt. Calkins and Foreman Gorst. The output was 4,300 tons in June and will be nearer 8,000 this month, if all goes well.

The picture accompanying this article was taken before the conveyor was roofed over, but gives a good idea of the way the product comes from the plant. At 11 o’clock every morning the briquets are loaded on railroad cars, and not long ago a train of eleven of these cars, loaded to the limit, pulled out of the yards.

The Briquet Plant has a fine crew of men working for it, and the good spirit existing among them is largely responsible for the success that is attending its operations.

Go here for more about the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Briquet Plant.

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 11, 1990

Historical society members help set the coal car back along Highway 169 (Photo by Brenda Berube)

Historical society members help set the coal car back along Highway 169
(Photo by Brenda Berube)

The authentic coal car that has greeted passersby in Black Diamond for nearly 30 years is back on its tracks along Highway 169.

The coal car, which was smashed May 20 when a trailer from an asphalt truck came loose along the highway, was rebuilt by the Black Diamond Historical Society and placed back in the grassy triangle between the highway and Roberts Drive on Thursday afternoon. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Fall 2012

Sculptor Paul Crites is currently working on the statue [2012], which should arrive in early 2013. This artist’s rendering also shows the pavers, granite benches, and memorial wall. At right is an example of Gomer’s brick—in memory of his father, also Gomer Evans.

This artist’s rendering shows the pavers, granite benches, and memorial wall. At right is an example of Gomer’s brick—in memory of his father, also Gomer Evans.

By Gomer Evans

I grew up in Black Diamond. My Mother and Dad had nine children in the “Diamond.” My Dad, who came from Wales, worked in the coal mines his entire life from the time he was 12 years old, so he saw many mine disasters.

As a fire boss he helped in a lot of the mine rescue operations. Many of those stories were published in the old Pacific Coast Bulletin. Continue Reading »

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