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Posts Tagged ‘Tahoma’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September and December 2006

By Barbara Nilson

JoAnn (Weibling) Klacson and Lois (Kelley) Bartholomew on a July visit to the MVHS museum. —Photo by Sherrie Acker

In July, JoAnn Weibling Klacsan visited the historical society’s Third Floor Museum, accompanied by her niece, Diane Lee Weibling, and chatted with Dick Peacock and Sherrie Acker about Kerriston. Neighbors of them were the Kelley girls, so Lois (Kelley) Bartholomew joined them at the museum to share memories.

The conversation was taped and part of it follows. In addition, Lois graciously, with a little arm twisting, allowed me to use part of the story she has written about growing up in Kerriston.

Klacsan recalled that all the houses in Kerriston in 1923 had underpinnings, and were all built on a side hill. “We had a porch with a lot of stairs and a nice view. The houses were shacks, all the same about 16′ x 18′. Close to the school there was a set of wooden steps that went down to the level below and us kids used to run down those steps.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2007

Photo taken approximately 1935. Standing in front of house (23360 Dorre Don Way) built by Gus and Rachael on property bought from Uncle John. They purchased about 15 acres of the land that was not platted on the east side of the road. From the left, back row: William Bradford, Gus Christy; left in front row: Mary (Daniels) Bradford, Rosalie Christy, William Christy, and Rachael (Bradford) Christy. Photo loaned by Marla Young.

Thanks to Sandy Faul and Marla Young for their responses to the request in the spring Bugle for information on Dorre Don and Orchard Grove.

Marla Young e-mailed, “l saw the article in The Bugle requesting information about Dorre Don and Orchard Grove. My family lived on both the Dorre Don portion of the road and Orchard Grove for many years.

“My Great Uncle John Daniels owned all of the land now known as Orchard Grove and approximately 40 acres on the other side of the railroad. In 1919 he subdivided the land between the road and river into lots and called it Orchard Grove. Apparently, there was a remnant orchard on part of the land when he purchased the property.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2005

By Barbara Nilson

In February of 1952 this group posed outside the Maple Valley Tavern in front of Bea and Bill Smith's logging truck. They are: Pat Iverson, Harold Heflinger, Darlene Thompson, Bea and Bill Smith, Marie Loveck, and George Hale. — Photo from Christine (Paris) Norheim to Sherrie Acker.

In February of 1952 this group posed outside the Maple Valley Tavern in front of Bea and Bill Smith’s logging truck. They are: Pat Iverson, Harold Heflinger, Darlene Thompson, Bea and Bill Smith, Marie Loveck, and George Hale. — Photo from Christine (Paris) Norheim to Sherrie Acker.

Recently Christine (Paris) Norheim of Enumclaw was cleaning out her house preparing to move when she came across a small book of prints labeled, “These photos were taken in Feb. of 1952 in front of the Maple Valley Tavern.” She called Sherrie Acker, the niece of the owner of the tavern, Claude Bowman, and presented her with them. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 4, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

The Tahoma baseball team of 1940 was largely made up of Ravensdale residents. They are: (front row) Gino Tedesco, Frank Primozich, Bob Lang, Gene Collins, Wally Habenicht, unknown, and Larry Krall; (second row) Otto Moore, coach; Frank Pooleskie and Louie Wallace; (back row) Frank Pichinini, Walt Olsen, Charles Fore, Kal Tantari, Bill Sweeney, Ed Kuhuski, and Tommy Lee — Photo compliments of the Maple Valley Historical Society

Memories will be flying fast and furious, Sunday, Sept. 15, as folks gather for the annual Ravensdale Reunion, 1 p.m., at the Maple Valley Community Center, corner of Witte Road S.E. and S.E. 248th St. The reunion is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

No program is planned for the afternoon, just a chance to get-together over a cup of coffee and visit, share introductions and a tale or two over the open mic. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 13, 1989

Maple Valley Day’s Cedar River offers a mecca for summer fun as these youngsters have discovered. — VOICE photo by Teresa Hensley. This young Sonics fan had a prominent spot in the recent Maple Valley Day Parade.

The judges had a difficult task in trying to decide winners among the many excellent entries in the June 2 Maple Valley Day Parade. Their final category decisions are listed below.

DRILL TEAMS, Section 1: 1st, Renaissance “A” Team; 2nd, Drill-A-Rines; 3rd, Ballard Eagles Jr. Drill Team.

DRILL TEAMS, Section 2: 1st, Burien Eagles Drill Team; 2nd, Renaissance “B” Team.

JEEP UNITS: 1st, Green River Valley Jeepers; 2nd, Powerline Pounders. (more…)

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Originally published in the North Maple Valley Living, June 2019

By JoAnne Matsumura

Roberta Bailey, Tahoma High School home economics teacher

As the community’s high school graduates are singing the tune of “No more teachers! No more books!” there are those former students who remember with fondness Roberta Bailey, their home economics teacher of the early 1960s.

In 1960, an invitation was sent to high schools throughout the United States for home economics teachers to submit their favorite recipes for publication in a book.

Maple Valley’s home economics teacher Roberta Bailey submitted her recipes and the one submitted for “Moist Meatloaf” was chosen for the Meats Edition cookbook of 1961 through 1963. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 14, 1976

By D’Ann Pedee

Bicentennial quilt: Thirty Maple Valley women are now putting the finishing touches on a handcrafted quilt as part of their Bicentennial year activities. The thirty patches, some of which are shown above, will depict this area historically, spotlighting some of its past and present. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

How do you place a value on a handcrafted quilt?

Perhaps by the amount of money it can be sold for or by averaging the time and services spent in completing it.

When finished, the Maple Valley Arts Committee could possibly have a three-thousand-dollar product on its hands. That’s the amount of money it is hoped will raised by raffling be of the Bicentennial quilt that thirty local women are in the process of completing. (more…)

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